"Contemporary Guitar Improvisation" by Marc Sliver

Discussion in 'Tab, Tips, Theory and Technique' started by thunderbyrd, Jun 5, 2019.

  1. thunderbyrd

    thunderbyrd Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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    I have seen this book advertised in guitar magazines for years, but I never considered getting it because I had assumed you had to read notation in order to use it. but it turns out that's not so. a friend has it and said it was very useful to him. the book is built (apparently) around 5 patterns. my friend said it took him about a year to really learn the patterns, but his playing really took off once he mastered them.

    so does anyone here have experience with this book?
     
  2. thunderbyrd

    thunderbyrd Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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    uh, well, I guess I have my answer.
     
  3. Chunkocaster

    Chunkocaster Poster Extraordinaire

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    It sounds useful, ive never heard of it. A year to learn 5 patterns seems like a long time.
     
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  4. klasaine

    klasaine Poster Extraordinaire

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    Depending on how you apply it, you can spend a year on one pattern and not reveal everything.

    In music (art in general), application is everything.
     
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  5. thunderbyrd

    thunderbyrd Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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    have you used this book, Klasaine? if you say yes, i'm definitely buying it.
     
  6. klasaine

    klasaine Poster Extraordinaire

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    No, I have not though I've heard about it for years.
    My comment just relates to the fact that one concept and/or way of looking at a "problem" or "puzzle" can lead down a very long road of solutions. So, a book with five main concepts, is potentially a ton of study material and discovery.
     
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  7. ImprovGuru

    ImprovGuru NEW MEMBER!

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    Thunderbyrd... I might be able to help with your question since I have been teaching Contemporary Guitar Improvisation for over 40 years. In fact, I am the author of the book (Marc Silver). You are correct that you don't need to be able to read music notation to get the full benefit of the material. However, if you ever want to learn how to read music notation, there is a lengthy lesson on applying the 5 Patterns to sightreading. Lesson 1 teaches you the 5 Patterns and their matching chords. Because these patterns are the foundation of EVERYTHING that follows, you want to spend as much time as necessary to master them before moving to the next lesson. In Lesson 2, you learn how to connect the 5 Patterns across the fingerboard so there are no longer any "dark spots" anywhere. In this eye-opening lesson you learn how all of the patterns and chords are related and connect to form keys. When you have mastered Lesson 2 you will have the ability to play anywhere on the the fingerboard over any chord. At this point you should ask yourself... is this knowledge worth the cost of the book? The good news is, there are six more lessons such as playing through chord changes, pentatonic substitutions for the 5 Patterns, chromatic connections, and more... plus a play-along CD with musical examples correlating directly to lessons in the book. If you have any specific questions, please feel free to ask. Hope that helps. -MS
     
    Last edited: Jun 8, 2019
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  8. thunderbyrd

    thunderbyrd Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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    checks in the mail, Mr Silver. looking forward to it!
     
  9. boneyguy

    boneyguy Doctor of Teleocity

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    I have seen the same ad for years as well......and George Benson give it a thumbs up too!! lol

    The 5 patterns are obviously CAGED.....I think that's a safe bet....so no surprises there.

    But the question is whether the book will be valuable beyond learning the CAGED patterns....how he applies it because there are numerous sources for just learning the CAGED patterns. For example, perhaps the book gets into some exercises to weave the CAGED patterns together so you can then see a single seamless pattern both up/down and across the fretboard rather than simply seeing 5 'block patterns' which is typically how CAGED or any other scale type system is presented.
     
  10. Warren Pederson

    Warren Pederson Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

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    That's pretty cool, the actual author of the book chiming in. I might have to buy just because of that.
     
  11. mfowler314

    mfowler314 Tele-Meister

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    I found this on the Jazz Guitar Forum
    https://www.jazzguitar.be/forum/imp...s-book-contemporary-guitar-improvisation.html

    "It is good to see Marc Silver's book back in print and with a CD, which can be purchased separately.

    I bought and used this quite a few years ago and I still have it around.

    It's easy to see that the book was successfully used in classroom instruction. There are plenty of assignments throughout and spaces for the reader to make his or her own entries. For example, Silver frequently asks the student to fill in scale/fingering patterns.

    I think of the book as a starting point for the beginning improviser. Silver doesn't assume that the reader knows the notes up and down the fretboard or knows how to read musical notation.

    Silver presents 5 major scale fingerings at the start of the book, but each has its related root chord, with one of the patterns serving two chord families. (Phrygian is left out until modes are discussed and piggybacks on another of the five patterns.) He shows a number of chord fingerings for each type of chord in root position. Major, minor, dominant.

    The relationship of the various patterns is shown. There are pages for each key with pages showing the patterns on a fretboard grid, followed by the notes on music staffs.

    Later on, modes are introduced, as is the ability of one pattern to express all the related modal chords, and the concept of playing in one position is put forward.

    Various chord progressions/song forms are presented and the student is shown how to determine which scale pattern to use for each chord or family of chords.

    There is a chapter on Pentatonics, which includes not only the major/minor pentatonic patterns, but the less familiar Sus7 (R, 3,4,5 b7) and one which Silver derives from the locrian pattern (R, b3, 4, b5, b7). Each of the Pentatonic Patterns is related and named for one of the five scale patterns and Silver instructs the reader that s/he can use them whenever the "parent" full scale would be used. Two patterns/forms of the major/minor pentatonic are presented, rather than the five patterns commonly taught. Each can be used with three of the basic patterns. (Thus there is a P-124 and a P-524 pattern). Silver then combines the P-124 and P-5 (locrian P) to form what he calls the Combined Blues (P-CB) with R, b3, 4, b5,5 and b7. Only one Combined blues pattern is presented.

    There follows two chapters on altered chords and on whole-tone, diminished, melodic minor, selected melodic minor modes, and harmonic minor. Some what confusingly to me, Silver, if I read him correctly, calls what is now generally called the altered dominant scale "diminished whole tone" scale which was perhaps the terminology of the era.

    In short, it is a valuable introduction to improvising, but I suspect that most forum members will be familiar with the material. Those who teach might consider it for their students."
     
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