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Compensated Nut?

Discussion in 'Telecaster Discussion Forum' started by littlebadboy, Jan 9, 2018.

  1. jhundt

    jhundt Poster Extraordinaire

    Age:
    64
    Mar 23, 2003
    Netherlands
    you may not care too much, but you explained it well, thanks very much.
     

  2. Wrighty

    Wrighty Tele-Holic

    620
    Aug 17, 2013
    Essex UK
    Sorry, can’t see it. Whatever the overal string length from bridge to nut, as soon as I put my finger on a fret, the length of the string from the bridge to my finger is what counts. Doesn’t matter if the finger to nut length is an extra 2 feet, it’s not played. Not being rude but I don’t see the science that proves it any other way.
     
    Owenmoney likes this.

  3. BryMelvin

    BryMelvin Tele-Afflicted

    Age:
    65
    Jan 4, 2014
    Arivaca AZ
    You do realize with files you can do this to ANY nut in a matter of minutes. If all you play is cowboy chords DO IT. it will help those sharp notes on the first 3 or so frets.
    Do it yourself to a cheap nut to try out. First.

    It will also change the position of harmonics slightly. So if you set intonation using 12 th fret harmonic. That will be off slightly.

    IMHO I have been playing guitar some even without bridge compensation (resonators in particular) on some for a long time. It's much more useful to practice develop an ear and be able to temper a tuning on the fly with a twitch of tuning key.

    If you have to, add a fretless instrument to your repertoire to develop an ear.
     
    LowThudd likes this.

  4. kennl

    kennl Tele-Afflicted

    Feb 6, 2007
    Moon Township, PA
    I bought a used USACG all rosewood neck with an Earvanna nut for a parts caster build.
    I like it.
    You can see the effect a standard nut produces for yourself.
    Tune your guitar so the the 12th fret notes are in tune (and correctly intonated)
    Then check the 13th and 1st frets. On guitars with an unwound G, you will find the first fret has some pitch issues.
    With compensated nut and saddles, I can play dense altered chords all over the instrument with better results.
    As others have mentioned, I would not spend the $$ and time to retrofit all my guitars, but if I were changing out a nut, I would compensate the nut slots with a Dremel while I was in the process.
     
    Last edited: Jan 10, 2018

  5. moosie

    moosie Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

    Age:
    61
    Jul 18, 2010
    Western Connecticut
    Think of a larger example. Instead of a comp nut slot, put an extension where the nut is, so that you can somehow mount a 10 foot long string, from bridge to the new "nut", waaaay out there, putting the guy's eye out in the front row seat. Now, you tune up to pitch. Yeah, I know, but play along. Now, when you fret the fifth fret, or whatever, sure, you have the same amount of distance to the bridge you had before, but you're not going to play an A note. Think about it. The key is what portion of the overall string this distance represents. Because it's that whole length that was tuned to pitch in the first place.
     

  6. LowThudd

    LowThudd Friend of Leo's

    Feb 11, 2014
    Sherman Oaks, Ca
    Right. I can get that. It affects the intonation between 1-11 and 13-21+. Causes the tuning between the open note and the 12th fret to be more precise in relation to the frets.
     

  7. Electric Mud

    Electric Mud Tele-Holic

    Age:
    40
    830
    Jan 26, 2017
    SW PA
    My X wife is a well compensated nut.
     

  8. moosie

    moosie Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

    Age:
    61
    Jul 18, 2010
    Western Connecticut
    Didn't watch, but that'll be interesting, since the Polytune doesn't tune single-string properly. Optimized for multi-string use, it fails to match any other (accurate) tuner. At least versions 1 & 2 did, not sure what they're on now. But when I brought it to their attention, they admitted it, and spun it as a feature, and said they had no plans to fix something that wasn't broken, that users just had to learn to use properly. A tuner. That doesn't tune. Uh huh.

    OK, rantlette over...
     

  9. Wrighty

    Wrighty Tele-Holic

    620
    Aug 17, 2013
    Essex UK
    Moose, you’re brilliant! Thanks for that simple and clear explanation. Question now is...............donI need a compensated nut!?
     
    moosie likes this.

  10. Owenmoney

    Owenmoney Tele-Holic

    692
    Oct 20, 2012
    Oley Pa
    But once you fret the notes they will be out of tune.
     

  11. moosie

    moosie Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

    Age:
    61
    Jul 18, 2010
    Western Connecticut
    My analogies might be OK, but I stumble all over the place trying to figure out "just intonation", equal temperament, "true temperament" etc.

    Sometimes I wonder if I ever played a guitar that intonated as accurately as a piano... would the difference blow me away? Am I just used to something that sounds terrible?

    I'm afraid to find out. Pretty happy with regular ol' nuts and frets.
     
    Owenmoney likes this.

  12. Ripradiant

    Ripradiant Tele-Holic

    993
    Jul 31, 2014
    Alberta Canada
    Sounds like a nut looking for compensation.
     
    MerleJam likes this.

  13. lammie200

    lammie200 Tele-Afflicted

    Jan 11, 2013
    San Francisco
    I think that if you have a couple of 25.5" scale guitars you can easily fit an Earvana nut to one for comparison sake. It was worth it to me to do both my Strat and Tele after I tried it. I also tried one on a 24.75 scale acoustic and wasn't as impressed.
     

  14. jhundt

    jhundt Poster Extraordinaire

    Age:
    64
    Mar 23, 2003
    Netherlands
    wrong. With the compensation, notes fretted on the first five frets will be IN tune, where they would be OUT of tune without compensation.
     
    JD0x0 likes this.

  15. guitar0621

    guitar0621 Tele-Meister

    149
    May 30, 2017
    USA
    I've been thinking about ordering one of these and probably will here in a bit. Compensated nuts usually correct the worst strings by about 5 cents, and if you have decent ears you can easily hear that much out of pitch. The only question I have is if the compensation slots, the way they are cut on these, will effect string bending. If they give any-- let the string move sideways-- when you bend this thing is a non-starter. But this nut is really appealing since it's a normal nut. The Earvana is oversized and not as aesthetically pleasing to me. Personally I'm willing to gamble the twelve bucks to find out.
     
    Last edited: Jan 12, 2018

  16. teleplayr

    teleplayr Tele-Holic

    I had an Earvana nut installed on my main Strat years ago.

    It worked out great and have no intentions removing it.
     

  17. Wrighty

    Wrighty Tele-Holic

    620
    Aug 17, 2013
    Essex UK
    Well, I’ve been told by several ‘experts’ (definition of an expert, a retired little drip under pressure), that the average human can detect an out of tune note when it hits 2 cents sharp or flat. How far out are we talking here when we say the intonation’s out?
     

  18. luckett

    luckett Friend of Leo's

    Jun 14, 2011
    .
    No, he is correct. A compensated nut just shifts intonation problems from one area of the neck to other frets. Compensated nuts don't "fix" intonation problems across the whole neck. They just move them to a different area of the neck.
     

  19. jhundt

    jhundt Poster Extraordinaire

    Age:
    64
    Mar 23, 2003
    Netherlands
    perhaps that happened on your guitar with a compensated nut. It certainly didn't happen on mine.
     

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