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Compensated Nut?

Discussion in 'Telecaster Discussion Forum' started by littlebadboy, Jan 9, 2018.

  1. littlebadboy

    littlebadboy Tele-Afflicted

    Jun 25, 2016
    Midwest, USA
    There's a company on eBay selling "compensated nuts".

    Thoughts?

    [​IMG]

    They have them in brass too.

    Description/Explanation:
    Guitar intonation is an often overlooked procedure which, when done properly, helps you get each string properly tuned. This means that your guitar sounds great regardless of whether you're fretting or playing open chords. How many times have you been playing, sounding great, when you bounce into an open C chord and suddenly the tuning sounds terrible? A properly compensated nut will fix this.

    There is NO REASON to pay $30 for Earvana!

    In our experience, the three treble strings are typically the most bothersome with respect to intonation. Who knows why, they simply are. So, we've specially slotted our compensated nut at the G, B and high E slots. By removing material to the proper depth in those three slots, the scale length for those strings is increased just enough.

    Bone adds a rich, mellow tone to your playing. Far superior to the dull thud of a plastic nut.

    Our flat-bottom nut is hand ground and sanded from solid bone and round-slotted for perfect string placement. 1 11/16" long, 1/8" thick, 3/16" tall. Fits any Fender style electric guitar.


    eBay store: https://www.ebay.com/usr/axemasters?_trksid=p2047675.l2559
     

  2. Old Tele man

    Old Tele man Friend of Leo's

    May 10, 2017
    Tucson, AZ
    Sounds like paychecks for idiots?
     
    Hexabuzz likes this.

  3. robt57

    robt57 Telefied Ad Free Member

    Feb 29, 2004
    Portland, OR
    What they neglect to mention is as soon as you fret a string the nut is moot.
     
    Piggy Stu, PelhamSG and RodeoTex like this.

  4. Jack S

    Jack S Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

    Sep 25, 2008
    Berwyn, IL
    This isn't quite true since what they do to compensate the nut will slightly change the string length so fretting it will still be affected.
     
    RoyBGood, JD0x0 and SecretSquirrel like this.

  5. Old Tele man

    Old Tele man Friend of Leo's

    May 10, 2017
    Tucson, AZ
    Micro-Frets did a better job...when they were in business.
     

  6. Buzz Feiten is another alternative. If you really are into intonation, that is a way to go.
     
    jimbo735 and Thin69 like this.

  7. littlebadboy

    littlebadboy Tele-Afflicted

    Jun 25, 2016
    Midwest, USA
    I may have not mentioned... it's only $12 for the bone and $16 for brass. Still not worth it?

    I was thinking that it is more of for open string notes.
     

  8. littlebadboy

    littlebadboy Tele-Afflicted

    Jun 25, 2016
    Midwest, USA
    Here is how it looks by the way:

    [​IMG]
     

  9. jhundt

    jhundt Doctor of Teleocity

    Age:
    64
    Mar 23, 2003
    Netherlands
    I have an Earvana and it helps. Some people do not believe in them, or even in the concept or need for such a thing. I do not try to argue with them or convince them, it's not worth the trouble. If you feel the urge to try a compensated nut, it must be because you have become aware of the tuning problems on some guitars, like I did.

    This product may or may not work. The Ebay site isn't especially convincing. But it is not very expensive, so if I was shopping for a nut I might give it a try, just to see. What's a couple of bucks in the grand scheme of things? Just imagine great big open chords ringing perfectly true!
     
    lammie200, mabley123, Wyzsard and 2 others like this.

  10. robt57

    robt57 Telefied Ad Free Member

    Feb 29, 2004
    Portland, OR
    IMO, probably less than finger pressure does.
     

  11. Wrighty

    Wrighty Tele-Holic

    833
    Aug 17, 2013
    Essex UK
    But surely it will change only the length between the nut and the fret, I.e., the bit you don’t play?
     
    LowThudd likes this.

  12. ebb soul

    ebb soul Poster Extraordinaire

    Age:
    58
    Jun 7, 2016
    Smyrna georgia
    Earvanna is better. Its up to you to say if it is $30 better.
    Mine are $27 actually.
     

  13. Jack S

    Jack S Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

    Sep 25, 2008
    Berwyn, IL
    Yes, probably, but there is a difference nonetheless.
     

  14. Jack S

    Jack S Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

    Sep 25, 2008
    Berwyn, IL
    The frets are spaced for a specific length between nut and bridge (granted, within a tolerance.) If the the string length is changed, then the frets will be either corrected for to improve the tolerance, or possibly made worse.
     

  15. LowThudd

    LowThudd Friend of Leo's

    Feb 11, 2014
    Sherman Oaks, Ca
    If I am grasping you right, the compensated nut helps with intonation between the 1st and 11th fret? If it is in tune at the nut, and intonated at the twelfth, that is the only difference I can see this making.
     

  16. moosie

    moosie Doctor of Teleocity

    Age:
    61
    Jul 18, 2010
    Western Connecticut
    No, it changes the overall string length, and the thus the frequency at each fret. Not endorsing, but that's the theory.
     

  17. Sollipsist

    Sollipsist Tele-Afflicted

    Age:
    47
    Aug 25, 2016
    89108
    I have an Earvana nut in both of the Warmoth necks I've purchased. The difference is noticeable enough on the low frets - about the same difference as setting intonation properly versus setting it "close enough." I do a lot of heavier gauge open string stuff on those two guitars specifically, so it's nice to have.

    It's not enough of a game-changer to retrofit the nut on any of my other guitars, and I probably wouldn't even bother with it if I was making a neck for a guitar meant for blues, jazz, or metal. A properly made straight nut is fine 99.9% of the time.
     

  18. jhundt

    jhundt Doctor of Teleocity

    Age:
    64
    Mar 23, 2003
    Netherlands
    it is not just string length that changes, it is string tension also. The string tension to achieve a given open tuning frequency is altered by adding/subtracting from the length of the string. So when you fret the string anywhere along the fretboard, though the length from that fret to the bridge remains the same as with an uncompensated nut, the tension of the string is not the same as it was.
     

  19. moosie

    moosie Doctor of Teleocity

    Age:
    61
    Jul 18, 2010
    Western Connecticut
    String tension isn't the point. String tension changes with different scale lengths, yet we have all the notes on various scale lengths (and their respective tensions).

    With the comp nut, the distance from fret to bridge remains the same, but the percentage of the string it represents has changed. It's a different place along that new scale length. The change in tension is a given, a side effect. Not a cause.

    At least I think that last sentence is right.

    Fact is, I don't have one, don't need one, and my care factor is pretty low on this topic.
     
    lammie200 and Owenmoney like this.

  20. Lefty Addams

    Lefty Addams Tele-Afflicted

    May 6, 2012
    England
    I found out just recently there is such a thing as a compensated nut, still a bit perplexed how it offers any advantages, but there you go.
     

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