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Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com

Careless neighbor burned my poly finish with a soldering iron

Discussion in 'Finely Finished' started by giantrobotswinbig, Jun 28, 2017.

  1. Veltek

    Veltek Tele-Meister

    478
    Sep 17, 2016
    Blues country
    OP,

    I know it sucks when you ding gear, and your friends kinda 4 letter D word, but I say leave the damage be! Strats look best with some relicing. That little burn mark makes your strat different from any one elses. Its like a scar or something from when you were a child It becomes part of you. At the end of the day, the guitar is just a tool for your musical inclinations. Tools that get used, get damaged and worn. Ya know?

    If you have your heart set on it though, I agree about putting some nailpolish on your guitar.

    OR another option is you can take it into an autobody shop and see if they can give you a little bit of matched paint to dab in there.
     

  2. songtalk

    songtalk Friend of Leo's


    Yeah that'll buff right out probably.

    I'd just refinish it in surf green nitro.
     
    MilwMark likes this.

  3. NotAnotherHobby

    NotAnotherHobby Tele-Afflicted

    Oct 27, 2015
    Da' Magic Mittin'
    Oh yeah! THAT'S the word of the day!

    :)
     

  4. RodeoTex

    RodeoTex Poster Extraordinaire

    Sep 14, 2005
    Nueces Strip
    A few times I've dropped blobs of hot on the finish of my guitar , but then again, they were MY guitars.

    Forgive your buddy and just do it yourself. Soldering isn't rocket surgery. It may be ugly at first, but if it works, you're done.
    Next time you'll make it look a little better.
     

  5. Wrong-Note Rod

    Wrong-Note Rod Poster Extraordinaire

    Mar 4, 2009
    atlanta
    play the thing and stop worrying about the paint.
     

  6. TwangToInfinity

    TwangToInfinity Tele-Holic

    Age:
    51
    551
    May 2, 2013
    Twangville
    at least you didnt pay him to burn it!

    i burn scratch ding my stuff for free!
     

  7. duke23433

    duke23433 TDPRI Member

    20
    Jan 6, 2014
    North Carolina
    Honestly that's probably the smallest crack I've ever seen in poly.

    Yeah he should have apologized but I think you're being a bit dramatic about it. I'm pretty sure every poly guitar I have has thin hairline cracks like that from some time or another. It's the nature of the beast. Was putting my am. standard strat back in its case and the lid started coming down when it was halfway in and gave it some lovely marks right on the face of the body. I cared at first but honestly I don't notice it, the guitar plays nice and it's unrealistic to expect no wear on guitars if you actually play.

    Your mark seems like it's really small and in a very hard to see area
     

  8. Lost_N_Austin

    Lost_N_Austin Friend of Leo's

    Age:
    75
    Feb 18, 2004
    Broken Arrow, Oklahoma
    Order a "Relic" TDPRI Shirt and wear it everyday so your Neighbor can see it.

    Lost_N_Austin
     

  9. The Ballzz

    The Ballzz Tele-Holic

    Age:
    62
    907
    Apr 11, 2016
    Las Vegas, NV
    FWIW, on the few "RARE" occasions that I've had a brand new, perfect guitar and friends wanted to "check it out" I promptly, intentionally and without hesitation ran the corner near the jack into something to put a ding in it before handing it to him/them. The look of horror on their faces was priceless, as they asked why I did that. I nonchalantly told them that I was protecting my very valuable friendship with them, by allowing myself to have the "first ding" of the inevitable many to come! My few "REAL" friends show me a pretty fair amount of respect!:cool:

    On to the "learning to do your own soldering" thing. Don't discount the importance of the details and once you've got the skills down, you'll own them for life! and BTW, a properly heated and prepped iron won't need much "leverage" and/or pressure applied to achieve a good joint:

    ================================================================================================

    Proper care, etiquette and maintenance are as important, if not more so, than the iron itself!

    A) Get a soldering iron/station that has the option of various tip sizes, along with a small assortment (2-4) of sizes of tips. Use the smaller for "fine" work and the larger for heavy stuff, like the back of pots, larger audio speaker connectors, etc. Right tool for the job. A stand is also good to have, if you don't get a station with one built in.
    B) Get a small sponge. The ones made specifically for soldering iron use are best and keep it damp to wet while soldering. Clean it by running under water and squeezing it out a few times before each soldering session. And, oh yeah, have a trash can handy!
    C) Before first use, heat iron up and wipe it on the sponge, then liberally apply solder to the tip and shake the excess off into the trash can. I call it the rattlesnake shake! Wipe tip off on the sponge and reapply solder. The iron is now ready to either be turned off/stored or sit there heated up and ready for use. "NEVER" let a soldering sit, while on or in storage without having had a fresh cleaning and coating of solder! The coating protects the tip from oxidation and that oxidation (as well as a dirty tip) is the enemy of good, efficient heat transfer.
    D) Now that your iron is heated, prepped and sitting happily in it's stand, get you wires/work arranged the way you want them. Pull the iron from it's stand and do the rattlesnake shake into the trash can, wipe tip on sponge, and dab a touch of solder onto the part of the tip that you want to use, apply that tip to the joint and then apply solder to the joint.
    E) When a suitable amount of solder has flowed into the joint, pull the solder away and then pull the iron away, "WITHOUT" disturbing or jostling the wires.
    F) If more joints need to be soldered, repeat "D" & "E". If done or more prep is needed for the next joint, do step "C"!
    G) When you're done, do step "C" and store your iron/station, ready for it's next adventure.
    H) FWIW, each wire should get "pre-tinned" before use. This is simply heating the wire enough to apply a bit of solder and then shaking off the excess.
    I realize this sounds like a lot of details, but religious adherence to these steps will get you well on your way to successful soldering that you can be proud of, as well as good longevity of your soldering iron!

    Oh yeah, a couple more points. Once your tip no longer likes to accept solder and provide (when wiped) a nice shiny coating, has a lot of black deposits on the working surface or becomes heavily oxidized, its time to replace it. And most tips won't give much satisfaction from "sanding" to a fresh surface, especially the more "high-tech" temperature sensing/controlled units!

    This is the one I've been using almost daily for over 10 years, for multiple repairs and amplifier builds, and a wide variety of tops easily available:

    https://www.amazon.com/Weller-WES51...9143216&sr=8-2&keywords=weller+soldering+iron


    This one saves a few bucks, but is just "so-so" and if you think you will use it more than a couple times a year, bite the bullet and get a good one:

    https://www.amazon.com/Weller-WLC10...9143216&sr=8-1&keywords=weller+soldering+iron

    And while "free standing" units can be handy for a "quick, mobile" toolbox, they just don't have the quality to make them a good value.


    Just My $.02 & Likely Worth Even Less!
    Gene
     
    LowCaster and giantrobotswinbig like this.

  10. Mike Simpson

    Mike Simpson Doctor of Teleocity

    Age:
    61
    Mar 19, 2006
    Gilbert, AZ (PHX)
    I don't understand how anyone can't solder... I have been soldering wires together since before there was an internet to tell me it was difficult and it required an elaborate setup. All you need is an inexpensive 25w or 30w Craftsman or Weller soldering iron and some solder. This is a very basic task and not hard to do. As my Uncle used to say... "Can't never could do anything".
     

  11. The Ballzz

    The Ballzz Tele-Holic

    Age:
    62
    907
    Apr 11, 2016
    Las Vegas, NV
    Yes Mike,
    You are correct, but there are some folks out there who get poop on their hands almost every time they do their business! :eek: Payin' attention and doin' things the right way, and all that. In this world, common sense isn't nearly as common as it would seem! :rolleyes: :p Just think of the multitudes of folks who haven't a clue as to how to check their own oil, make sure their tires have enough air to be safe, or for that matter even have enough gas to not get stranded!
    Just Sprayin'
    Gene
     
    Last edited: Jun 29, 2017

  12. Silverface

    Silverface Poster Extraordinaire Ad Free Member

    Age:
    65
    Mar 2, 2003
    Lawndale CA
    One important thing that needs to be added -

    Adjustable temperature.

    Fixed temp irons are not suitable for most printed circuit boards and cheap imported switches installed on many guitars. They often can't handle grounds on the back of pots and especially in amplifiers.

    See above. Without excellent, precise, quick/accurate soldering skills a 25 W iron will destroy many printed circuit board traces. OTOH they are usually not hot enough for soldering grounds on pots (depending on the pot and wire type) and definitely not hot enough for amplifier grounds.

    The type of solder is also important - if someone blindly buys mechanical type solder (which isn't labeled that way) electrical joints will fail.
     

  13. beezerboy

    beezerboy Tele-Meister

    Age:
    66
    308
    Sep 7, 2016
    AK
    so when I said hit it with 1500, then rubbing compound I assumed someone would know to use a compound the removes the scratches left by 1500 sandpaper. when I started dinkin' with paint 50ish years ago, thats what it was called..... compound, and it came in different cuts. still does. anyway, thats what I would do first.... a little at a time so you can see how the work progresses and not take off too much. there is a point of no return where you become committed to doing a paint in repair, and if that goes wrong a total re-paint. you may find that a little polishing makes it livable.... slobbering on some other paint may not be that good. and btw, metallics are hard to match because it's not just the color, its particle size and the flow patterns too. as another inmate posted...
    "any attempt to fix this might produce more damage"
     

  14. TwangToInfinity

    TwangToInfinity Tele-Holic

    Age:
    51
    551
    May 2, 2013
    Twangville
    buff it really hard with a brown paper bag then rub some forehead grease on there for shine!
     

  15. The Ballzz

    The Ballzz Tele-Holic

    Age:
    62
    907
    Apr 11, 2016
    Las Vegas, NV
    "Side of your nose grease" will provide a different sheen! :p
    Just Sayin'
    Gene
     

  16. Mike Simpson

    Mike Simpson Doctor of Teleocity

    Age:
    61
    Mar 19, 2006
    Gilbert, AZ (PHX)
    What sort of high tech soldering iron and special solder do you figure Fender used building tweed amps and Telecasters in the 50's ?

    .
     

  17. Asmith

    Asmith Friend of Leo's Ad Free Member

    Age:
    21
    Nov 27, 2014
    Morley, England
    I know a thing or two about getting the first dent into a guitar, I've had 4 guitars and half of them had a nasty tumble. My long gone Fender Stratocaster got knocked off a stand the night I got it and got a couple of dents in the finish, no cracks or chips at least though. My first guitar was used strat knock off and I turned it into the beast in my signature and after finishing the transformation it fell off a stand and the Tru-oil not being as bump protective as poly left large dents on the body. After a week they were long forgotten hopefully you'll feel the same about the blemish on yours.
     

  18. Silverface

    Silverface Poster Extraordinaire Ad Free Member

    Age:
    65
    Mar 2, 2003
    Lawndale CA
    Please re-read my post.

    I wasn't talking about tweed amp construction nor the types of electronics in those guitars. Fender assembly workers used huge irons - but they were also trained to perform specific tasks and were not part-timers working on Squire guitar one day and a PCB amp the next.
     

  19. logankolarick

    logankolarick Tele-Meister

    230
    May 23, 2017
    Tennessee
    I don't know why you're getting so much flack for this post. I realize that it's probably mostly fixable with nail polish, but DUDE I'D BE MAD TOO. You have every right to be. It seems like you'd be ok if he had apologized. He is your friend of ten years so punch him in the arm real hard one good time, call him some endearing cuss words, and move on with the friendship. But still throw it in his face time to time to get a free drink or something...Example:

    You: You're buying next round
    Him: I buy every round man, It's your turn.
    You: Oh is it my turn?
    Him: Yeah. It is!
    You: So... it's my turn to carelessly burn your guitar with a soldering iron?

    That should work for the duration of your life.
     

  20. Mike Simpson

    Mike Simpson Doctor of Teleocity

    Age:
    61
    Mar 19, 2006
    Gilbert, AZ (PHX)
    I always put a piece of cardboard, newspaper or even a rag over the paint to protect it.
     

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