Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com
Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com
Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com

Can this wood be saved?

Discussion in 'Tele Home Depot' started by lookslikemeband, Apr 20, 2017.

  1. lookslikemeband

    lookslikemeband Tele-Holic

    566
    Apr 10, 2011
    CO - again
    Some serious cupping.... Ideas?

    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]
     

  2. Seasicksailor

    Seasicksailor Tele-Afflicted

    Age:
    41
    Jun 26, 2012
    Bristol UK
    No idea, but I don't see why you shouldn't try it. Encyclopedia Britannica? ;-)
     

  3. Blue Bill

    Blue Bill Friend of Leo's Ad Free + Supporter

    Feb 15, 2014
    Maine
    Those look like a gone-er. The only chance you have to straighten them is some major steam-heating. You may get lucky with roasting and clamping, but that doesn't work every time. You probably can find a YouTube vid showing how to make a steam box, and figure out a clamping strategy.

    It's way easier, and probably cheaper, to get some other boards.
     
    jimash likes this.

  4. nosmo

    nosmo Friend of Leo's

    Jan 31, 2012
    Lake Jackson, TX
    Yeah, they're definitely useless.

    Send them to me.
     
    crisscrosscrash likes this.

  5. metecem

    metecem Friend of Leo's

    Absolutely useless... I'll pay the shipping if you need to get rid of them.
     
    crisscrosscrash likes this.

  6. Anode100

    Anode100 Friend of Leo's

    May 9, 2014
    Behind my beard.
    "Cups more than an inappropriate Tailor..."
     
    Deeve and R. Stratenstein like this.

  7. R. Stratenstein

    R. Stratenstein Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

    Aug 3, 2010
    Loganville, Ga.
    You might be able to glue them down, with some pretty hefty clamping force, on a solid substrate. They look to me like body caps, anyway. My experience with boards so badly cupped is that they WANT to be cupped like that, (bad tailor notwithstanding :D), and anything you do to flatten them will gradually creep back to the cupped state. Unless they are forcibly held flat.
     
    I_build_my_own likes this.

  8. teletimetx

    teletimetx Poster Extraordinaire Gold Supporter

    Jul 25, 2011
    Houston, TX
    pre-curved radius fretboard?
     

  9. Blue Bill

    Blue Bill Friend of Leo's Ad Free + Supporter

    Feb 15, 2014
    Maine
    You guys! :rolleyes:
     

  10. Frodebro

    Frodebro Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

    Age:
    47
    Aug 17, 2012
    Seattle
    Got a jointer and a planer?
     
    blkpwdr and lookslikemeband like this.

  11. Flakey

    Flakey Friend of Leo's

    Henry, lookslikemeband and Steve Holt like this.

  12. TRexF16

    TRexF16 Friend of Leo's

    Apr 4, 2011
    Tucson
    If those boards are planned for a top, is it going to be a carved top or flat. If carved, you need to retain a lot more width. If flat, 1/4" ought to be enough, even less if you're using binding. How thick are they now? They look about a half inch to 5/8 or so.

    The first thing you could do to try to get them flat enough to plane would be to wet the cupped sides pretty thoroughly and see if the swelling that produces on the cupped side is enough to flatten them out. It can be a powerful force! I once left a fully dried piece of flat lumber, 3/4" thick, lying on another board that was pretty green. I found it a few days later massively cupped up away from the "green" board, just from the moisture that had been absorbed by the dry board from the wet one. If it straightens out a little from that process you might be able to clamp it flat and let it dry that way. at least maybe it will get flat enough to plane out the cup. Joint the cupped side until flat then plane it to a little over your final thickness (on both boards). Then glue up the bookmatch. Once it's down to 1/4" it should be flexible enough to be glued down to the body, even if it has a little cup still. If both sides are equally pretty, I'd glue it down with the cupped up edges to the outside. That way, the act of clamping down the edges will apply inherent down force in the middle for a good glue joint. I hope this makes sense. If it's too complicated, I'm #3 on the "just give up and send it to me" list ;)

    Good luck.

    Rex
    [EDIT: if you wet the insides of the cupped faces, you could also simply clamp the boards firmly together with the cupped faces inwards. Adjust the clamps to try to get the resulting sandwich flat as possible and wang 'er down. Let sit for a few days and loosen the clamps to check the result. Keep you eye on it in case it is so effective it starts to cup the other way!]
     
    Flakey and lookslikemeband like this.

  13. lookslikemeband

    lookslikemeband Tele-Holic

    566
    Apr 10, 2011
    CO - again
    Yes Sir

    LOL. It's all good!


    Thank you Rex! I'm going to try to save these. They're the last (and obviously worst) of a batch of tops I got a long time ago.
     
    DrASATele likes this.

  14. mefgames

    mefgames Tele-Afflicted Platinum Supporter

    Oct 31, 2010
    North Bay, Ca

  15. Marn99

    Marn99 Tele-Meister

    Age:
    18
    431
    Nov 25, 2016
    Brookfield, WI
    Laminate thin drop tops?
     
    I_build_my_own likes this.

  16. DrASATele

    DrASATele Poster Extraordinaire

    Jul 6, 2012
    North of Boston
    I was given similar wood from a buddy who had started then gave up on the hobby. His were just shy of 1/2 and just shy of 3/8ths when I finally got them on to a guitar. What really stunk was the fact that they were book matched to begin, warped enough that I had to reshape the both pieces before gluing, but I made it work. Patience and time are key.
     

  17. Ripthorn

    Ripthorn Tele-Afflicted

    Age:
    35
    Oct 22, 2009
    Austin, TX
    A lot of the time, this happens when one side absorbs more moisture than the other. Try wetting the side that is on the table in your picture and sticker the wood. Some weight wouldn't hurt either. It's going to be a slow process to save them, if you can.
     

  18. Henry

    Henry Tele-Holic Ad Free + Supporter

    891
    Jan 2, 2012
    Australia
    Back ploughing. Common timber profiles with a width/thickness ratio greater than 4:1 and only one "appearance" face are almost always back ploughed (think skirting boards and timber flooring).
     

IMPORTANT: Treat everyone here with respect, no matter how difficult!
No sex, drug, political, religion or hate discussion permitted here.