Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com
Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com
Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com

British Folk Rock

Discussion in 'Music to Your Ears' started by Dan R, May 24, 2015.

  1. micpoc

    micpoc Friend of Leo's

    Mar 17, 2007
    Louisiana
    I am a long-time fan of much that has been posted here, but I only discovered this band, Comus, in the late 90s. At the time I managed a used record store, and we had just acquired a large batch of vinyl from an estate sale, which included this album. I played a few minutes of it, then decided I'd better make a tape of it, pronto. We sold it a few hours later. Easy to find now, of course, but it was a holy grail of sorts for a long time. Though rooted in British Isle folk music, the sensibility at work here is of a different order… not much rock in it, quite frankly. But pretty unforgettable.


    EDIT: I should add, it is NOT for everybody.
     

  2. LoveHz

    LoveHz Tele-Holic

    532
    Nov 21, 2014
    Kent, UK
    Some extremely good players -- John Renbourn, Davy Graham, Bert Jansch, Danny Thompson, Richard Thompson etc, but as a genre I always did my best to avoid it. Maybe it was the vocal stylings that put me off. However, John Martyn is the notable exception. Brilliant bloke.
     

  3. Dan R

    Dan R Friend of Leo's

    Age:
    59
    Mar 17, 2003
    Charleston, SC
    I always liked Richard Thompson, but did not have much interest in the others. I've learned to enjoy music from many of these groups over time.. Either you like it or you don't.

    I think what's interesting is that British and American Folk music have a kinship. Bob Dylan goes electric and British bands as well. The banjo is an American instrument, but used often in the British Folk. Not to mention that Bluegrass is a derivative of Scotch/Irish music. Folk Rock is intertwined between both countries. across the pond, as they say.
     

  4. Tony Done

    Tony Done Friend of Leo's

    Age:
    72
    Dec 3, 2014
    Toowoomba, Australia
    In the '60s a lot of US folk and blues players toured the UK - I saw a fair few of them - so the US influence on aspiring players such as myself was very strong. I wonder how much went the other way, East to West?
     

  5. Mjark

    Mjark Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

    Feb 14, 2011
    Annapolis, MD
    Remember Matthews Southern Comfort?
     

  6. Dan R

    Dan R Friend of Leo's

    Age:
    59
    Mar 17, 2003
    Charleston, SC


    I hear elements of British and US folk in this tune. I think that British Folk influenced some US bands. Country is made of 'ol' timey' music, which was originally British Folk. Goose Creek Symphony is kinda like a US version of Fairport Convention.

    Not only that, British Folk was so important it appeared in many big British rock band's music, like LZ, Wishbone Ash, Jethro Tull and others.
     
    Last edited: May 28, 2015

  7. simonsp

    simonsp Friend of Leo's

    Jan 13, 2013
    England
    C.O.B (Clive's Original Band)

     

  8. Del Pickup

    Del Pickup Poster Extraordinaire

    Mar 24, 2008
    New Zealand
    Oh yes I do. They were a good band. Iain Matthews first band after leaving Fairport. He then went on to make many great solo albums in the 70's and also formed a band called Plainsong in 1971/72 which made a fantastic album called 'In Search of Amelia Earhart' and another one which only saw the light of day about 10 years ago as the band broke up shortly after the first album was released and during the recording of the second album. I think I've already posted YouTube clips of some of their songs in another thread recently so I'll only post this one here.



    This is one of my personal favourites from the album.
     

IMPORTANT: Treat everyone here with respect, no matter how difficult!
No sex, drug, political, religion or hate discussion permitted here.