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Bridge saddles not centered?

Discussion in 'Tele-Technical' started by EVH2, May 9, 2018.

  1. EVH2

    EVH2 TDPRI Member

    Age:
    51
    3
    May 9, 2018
    Belgium
    Hi everyone!

    I just have (almost) finished my first tele build thanks to a treasure of information on this pages!
    But now I have a question about the bridge, it's a 70ties 6 saddle bridge and it seems that the saddles are not centered with the result that the strings are not aligned properly on my neck. The first saddle hole is 12mm from the side and the right one 8 mm. I made the body and neck with templates so I think all holes and the neckpocket are on the right places? What am I doing wrong?

    Here some pictures:

    20180509_120014.jpg
    20180509_115826.jpg
     

    Attached Files:


  2. Wally

    Wally Telefied Ad Free Member

    Mar 17, 2003
    Lubbock, TX
    Very slightly loosen the neck screws. With a screwdriver in place to retighten a screw and with the guitar facing you, pull the headstock to your left in order to realign the neck properly. When the outside strings are equally spaced from the edges of the neck, tighten the screws.
     
    telemnemonics likes this.

  3. EVH2

    EVH2 TDPRI Member

    Age:
    51
    3
    May 9, 2018
    Belgium
    Ok thanks, I wil try that but the neck is sitting very tight in the neckpocket so I hope I can move it a bit.
     

  4. Wally

    Wally Telefied Ad Free Member

    Mar 17, 2003
    Lubbock, TX
    I have never met a bolt-on neck that could not be ‘aligned’ this way unless the screwholes in the neck were improperly positioned. It may be necessary to fill and redrill the neck holes in order to put the neck in the right position. If the pocket is too tight to move the neck a tiny bit, you may have to do some work on the sides of the pocket to get the neck aligned. I recently had to do this for a USAGC body in order to fit a Valley Arts neck to the body.
     

  5. telemnemonics

    telemnemonics Doctor of Teleocity

    Age:
    58
    Mar 2, 2010
    Maine
    Yeah the saddles are designed so the strings sit to one side and the intonation screw sits to the other side, thus they do not center on the bridge plate.
    Your problem is a typical small neck alignment issue.
     

  6. Wally

    Wally Telefied Ad Free Member

    Mar 17, 2003
    Lubbock, TX
    As for the saddles.... you might want to do this. Put the high E string forward. Then, set the B back a bit, the G is back from the, the D saddle is forward of the G but not as far forward as the high E, the A is back from that and the lowmE is farther back than any other string. This is the correct pattern for good intonation if you are running a plain G string. That arrangement might let the high E come in a bit...not much but a bit...so that it better aligns with the pickup pole.
     

  7. Asmith

    Asmith Friend of Leo's

    Age:
    22
    Nov 27, 2014
    Morley, England
    To be honest it just looks like guitar needs a good setup. I agree the neck needs a nudge over to one side and that should drag the saddles over too the left too which will align the pickup better. But its also clear that it needs to be intonated and have the string height set.
     

  8. EVH2

    EVH2 TDPRI Member

    Age:
    51
    3
    May 9, 2018
    Belgium
    The guitar is not setup yet, I just noticed that the sanddles are not centered. I will setup the guitar this evening and will post the results. Thanks!
     

  9. boris bubbanov

    boris bubbanov Telefied Ad Free Member

    The advice of the guys above, is all top notch. But know, this type of "6 hammer saddle" bridge will shrug off efforts to keep things aligned and set up for any length of time. This design is born to drift off on you, as you play it, and to need constant fiddling and TLC.

    My suggestion is to do the Neck Alignment Trick that Wally referenced (it needs that anyway) and to remove this bridge and replace it with a variation of the basic 1952 St. Leo 3 barrel approach. Get a $ 14 "3 hole" plate and some slightly slant compensated brass saddles ($ 20) from Darren Riley. I would commend you to someone in the EU, but nobody there I've heard of has these nicely compensated Fender 3 brass saddles.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
    RodeoTex, SPUDCASTER and NilsZippo like this.

  10. raito

    raito Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

    Nov 22, 2010
    Madison, WI
    Are you sure you mean a 3-hole plate? The OP's pictures are 4 hole, as is your picture.

    My problem with that type of saddle is that it's hard to get the saddles level, and even if I do, the non-string-side screw starts to rattle. But I don't want a bunch of tilted saddles, either.
     

  11. kinkstah

    kinkstah Tele-Afflicted

    Sep 22, 2007
    Brittany
    +1. I had such a "6 hammer saddle" bridge on one of my Telecasters, and no matter how much I tried to live with it (for intonation sake), it came to the point where I grew tired of constantly having to re-adjust it. It always wanted to slide 'downwards" (i.e. towards the treble side of the brigeplate), plus the screws -thus the saddles- were unstable... All in all, I came to see it as a buzzing, rattling, ill-conceived device, and eventually returned to the 3-barrel type design (except I opted for 3 threaded steel saddles).
     
    boris bubbanov likes this.

  12. kinkstah

    kinkstah Tele-Afflicted

    Sep 22, 2007
    Brittany
    I think Boris is referring to the 3-holes needed for the barrel saddles (as opposed to the 6-holes for the hammer saddles)
     
    Macrogats likes this.

  13. boris bubbanov

    boris bubbanov Telefied Ad Free Member


    Thanks. I could hardly figure out what I even meant, just reading it. Just to clarify, yes, 3 holes in the rear edge for the saddles and 4 mount holes, mounting to the body.
     

  14. RodeoTex

    RodeoTex Poster Extraordinaire

    Sep 14, 2005
    Nueces Strip
    I had that very situation with my first Tele build.
    My solution was to place some layers of plastic in between the high E saddle and the side of the bridge to force all the saddles over.
    I intended to get back to it later but it's worked fine since 1989.
    Yes, I know this is not the solution you're looking for.
     

  15. The Ballzz

    The Ballzz Tele-Afflicted

    Age:
    63
    Apr 11, 2016
    Las Vegas, NV
    I personally view that style of saddle as an abomination, right along with Fender's offset screw bridge saddles on the American Standard Strats, along with a few other models. Looking at it from both mechanical and geometric standpoints brings up a fairly long list of possible/probable shortcomings! This also makes a good argument in favor of the three saddle design! A Tele is a Tele and SHOULD be a Tele! :p
    Just My $.02,
    Gene
     

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