Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com Reiland Pickups
Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com Reilander Pickups
Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com Reilander Pickups
Join TDPRI Today

Brainy Memorial Build – A Long, Slow, Comfortable Fumble Around In The Dark

Discussion in 'Tele Home Depot' started by Reckless Rat, Sep 12, 2016.

  1. Reckless Rat

    Reckless Rat Tele-Meister

    339
    Feb 26, 2014
    UK
    A lot has already been said by many people more eloquent than me. I greatly enjoyed not only Brainy's general sense of fun and enormous enthusiasm, but also his willingness to present and discuss his mistakes as well as his triumphs, and to help out and encourage. Despite the (good-natured!) ribbing he got about refinishing, I thought it was emblematic of his high level of craftsmanship – it would be right, even if he had to sand a guitar down to a nubbin in the process!

    Andy is inextricably linked to TDPRI in my mind. I’m not necessarily the most sociable of people, but I had the feeling I would have enjoyed meeting up with him sometime. Sadly I never go the chance, but, to paraphrase William Turner - “Don't you wish you did?”
     
    Mbechmann and DrASATele like this.
  2. Reckless Rat

    Reckless Rat Tele-Meister

    339
    Feb 26, 2014
    UK
    When the subject of a memorial build came up, my thoughts went to something I had thought about 2 years ago but not actually done much with, other than some experimental fiddling
    around. First, though, was a well-needed kick up the butt to actually get some stuff done.

    When I first built the benches in my garage, I had intended to put some shelves underneath for added storage. The idea was the fit them on the supporting framework – easy enough, you’d think. Well, you’d be right, but it took me four years to actually do it.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    That done, something else I’d been meaning to do was make a cyclone dust separator – see this thread here for details.

    Finally, something I had wanted to do for some years was to replace my dinky little 9” bandsaw with something considerably larger. Recently, I got (very) lucky on Ebay and picked up this SIP 14” bandsaw with little use. You can see the difference here:

    [​IMG]
    “When I grow up, I’m going to be just like you...”

    The table is cast iron and needed a bit of a clean-up, but after some work with WD40 and steel wool, I cleaned down with white spirit and then applied a coat of wax. The handle on the fence is pot metal of some sort and had snapped off. I am in the process of manufacturing a replacement from a lump of aluminium; the head is a simple eccentric cam with a pin through it.

    The next thing to do was to build it something to live on. I made a wheeled trolley for it that rests on locking castors. The timber was 3x2 framing, all notch-jointed and then glued and screwed. It seems to be pretty strong, and although the saw has a permanent home I can move it around easily if needed.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Having helped make the new bandsaw its trolley, I bade the little bandsaw farewell by trading it to a woman I work with who is a talented wood carver. It’s done me sterling service for four guitars, and although it’s gone to a good home I was still a little sad to see it go. It did finally give me a proper home for the ROSS, though. That’s the Rutlands Oscillating Spindle Sander – something that Brainy brought to my attention a year or so ago, the first of this type in the UK.
     
  3. Reckless Rat

    Reckless Rat Tele-Meister

    339
    Feb 26, 2014
    UK
    Somewhere in this thread, there is a mild danger that a guitar may break out. As I said above, a few years ago I noticed that when you cut out a body you are left with the bit that isn’t a guitar. So, if you were to clean it up, draw another line a little wider… you’d have something not unlike sides.

    [​IMG]

    I did some sketching, then dived back into the offcuts pile to join everything up. I also found a block to attach a neck (and possibly a neck pickup?) and a tail block as well. After some fettling with chisels, ROSS, and #5 plane, there was a high-precision clamping operation, and then I could clean up the outside – and the inside, for that matter. I’m pretty pleased with it so far.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    This thing is only good for air guitar at the moment. I’m going to need a top and bottom, and so I made the trip to my local timber merchant to pick up some maple. I also found a nice, dry piece of Sapele in their offcuts pile at the same time.

    [​IMG]

    This stuff is all rough-cut. With nothing much better to do, I started to smooth and flatten with the #4 and #5. It’s fair to say it’s a big job! The maple is killing my arms, but the Sapele is great to work with.

    [​IMG]

    I’m quite proud of this; a full-width shaving the whole length of the board. Strangely satisfying!

    [​IMG]

    I think I will probably settle for passing the maple over the planer, and I can re-saw it on the new bandsaw, having invested in some blades from Tuffsaws including a skip-tooth resaw blade. Again, something new for me! To do that, though, I need to make a resaw fence…

    So where am I going with this? The overall plan is pretty vague. A carved top, a carved bottom. A neck, probably with an angled 3-a-side headstock. A floating bridge, a trapeze tailpiece (maybe). Beyond that? Who knows. I may get around to it before the deadline. The common theme is generally that I have no idea what I’m doing. A long, slow, comfortable fumble around in the dark, if you will.

    [​IMG]
     
  4. Forum Sponsor Sponsored posting

  5. nosmo

    nosmo Friend of Leo's

    Jan 31, 2012
    Lake Jackson, TX
    That's my kind of build. Carry on.
     
    GracefulBrick and ModerneGuy like this.
  6. DrASATele

    DrASATele Friend of Leo's

    Jul 6, 2012
    North of Boston
    I'm in and I will second the notion that I to envisioned meeting Andy or in some way sharing in his love of wood :oops: ah, lumber, ah, for ah, trading purposes.

    A lot of this sort of thing going on in the last few years I dig the concept. I'm kicking a similar idea around in the dark as well
     
    Mbechmann likes this.
  7. R. Stratenstein

    R. Stratenstein Doctor of Teleocity

    Aug 3, 2010
    Loganville, Ga.
    Awesome, Ratty! You're doing what I should have, but nooooooo, I have to "challenge myself" more like ***king myself, I fear. Love the shop upgrades, too.
     
    DrASATele likes this.
  8. Mbechmann

    Mbechmann Friend of Leo's

    Jan 18, 2013
    Grindsted, Denmark
    I am in. Cant wait to see what you come up with. I too, feel sad that I never met Andy in real life. Thats the downside of having internet friends.
     
    DrASATele likes this.
  9. maxvintage

    maxvintage Friend of Leo's

    Age:
    57
    Mar 16, 2003
    Arlington, VA
    Very cool! I made a couple versions of a hollow flattop tele with a standard bridge

    Hollow tele v3

    I'm still extremely happy with it.
     
    DrASATele likes this.
  10. maxvintage

    maxvintage Friend of Leo's

    Age:
    57
    Mar 16, 2003
    Arlington, VA
    I hate hogging out a solid body with a router, and I think bending sides would be really tough with the cutaway. I've thought about sawing shaped sides, but from what you've done it looks like joining those body parts would be really tough to get the joint right and tough to clamp it. How'd you do that?
     
  11. LeftFinger

    LeftFinger Tele-Holic

    734
    Aug 16, 2015
    Saskatchewan
    Ooh Rattay you made a ribbon.
    This ones on my list of guitars I will probably never finish.
     
  12. RickyRicardo

    RickyRicardo Friend of Leo's

    Mar 27, 2012
    Calgary, Alberta
    Very cool. I'll be watching!
     
  13. Reckless Rat

    Reckless Rat Tele-Meister

    339
    Feb 26, 2014
    UK
    Aye-aye, Cap'n Nosmo.

    I already have wood stacked up in odd corners of the house. I really need to start using some of it! And still those clock movements sit on the shelf, awaiting their new homes...

    On the contrary, Rick, you're doing it 'properly', i.e. with Brenda and Malleable Matt, while I blunder around like a womble, 'making good use of the things that we find'.

    Welcome aboard! I can't promise it will be revolutionary, but it'll all be new for me. It may even work... :)

    That's some seriously nice work on those teles. The amber on v3 with the parallel grain of the spruce gives me a real Classical vs Tele vibe - I like it!

    You can sort of see it in one of the oblique photos above (3rd photo in my last post). Basically, I made sure the inside of the tips of the longest parts were smooth and vertical, then sanded the ends of the curved bits that make up the upper and lower horns so that they had a long mating surface with the same curve rather than a butt join. I was a little surprised that I didn't really need any sophisticated clamping arrangement other than light pressure from the usual array of hand clamps. The tail block is fairly standard. The neck block has an long joint for the lower horn as before, while the upper horn fits into a little notch I cut in the neck block. This was because this was going to be the only butt joint (with the exception of the tail, where it would be supported by the tail block). Once all the joints had set, I trimmed off the external excess and then rounded over the joints with the ROSS to make it all look nice. Eventually, the sides will be reinforced by the front and back, so the whole thing ought to be pretty strong once it's assembled. I hope.

    [​IMG]
    Pls excuse crappy, in-progress photo

    Hehe, progress is progress. It wasn't so long ago that such a thing was beyond me!

    Thanks Ricky, I'd better start making some progress; that deadline is creeping up fast!



    There's not a lot of other progress to report yet, although I have finished the new handle for the bandsaw fence and it's back on the saw as of tonight. To celebrate, I treated it to a new blade (from Tuffsaws); as you can see, the one that it came with was well-loved, and about as sharp as wet spaghetti.

    [​IMG]

    This combination emphasises what a quantum leap in quality the new saw is - I can set the fence accurately off the scale, it's quiet, and it cuts (ply, at least) like there's nothing there. The only downside is that the table has non-standard slots and I don't have a mitre gauge, but I can probably at least make a cross-cut sled that will do 95% of what I want.

    The frame of the bandsaw trolley is now clad; I just need to make some doors and it will be fully enclosed. Then I can start on the resaw fence and this guitar will get moving again.
     
    DrASATele likes this.
  14. R. Stratenstein

    R. Stratenstein Doctor of Teleocity

    Aug 3, 2010
    Loganville, Ga.
    That blade does look well-loved. And congrats on the fashion footwear, I'd be tempted to follow suit, but prolly within 10 minutes I'd be on my way to Emergency with some horrendous object embedded, or burns, or crushing injuries, or---you name it.

    I like "Malleable Matt", and shall appropriate it, please.
     
    DrASATele likes this.
  15. Reckless Rat

    Reckless Rat Tele-Meister

    339
    Feb 26, 2014
    UK
    Yes, that sort of footwear (or the Australian Safety Boots) is reserved for the 'Whoops, I forgot to get a picture of that' moments. I bought some steel-toed chef's clogs a few years back for working in the garage, which means I can just step into them on the way out the door and I have some faint hope of protection from falling items (or kicking the sticking-out legs of the workmate) while working.

    They're great because there's no effort in putting them on and they're always there right where I go to step outside. If I had to lace up my proper safety boots (steel toe and midsole), I'd probably never bother.
     
  16. Reckless Rat

    Reckless Rat Tele-Meister

    339
    Feb 26, 2014
    UK
    Last time on An Idiot With Power Tools...

    I said I needed to make a resaw fence. Dunnit.

    [​IMG]

    Yep, she's about as square as my flared pants with the sequins...

    [​IMG]

    Have I mentioned that I love this saw yet? You just set the fence, and rzzzzip! As long as you start with one square edge, you can't go wrong. (HINT: I will go wrong).

    The trolley is now completely enclosed. I just need to get some catches for the doors

    [​IMG]

    In terms of actual progress with the guitar, I sawed down my maple to manageable sizes, trued up one edge with the #5 plane, then cut off the wobbly edge with the soft, crumbly stuff (?) so that it would fit on the jointer. Then, cupped side down, I ran them over the jointer until flat.

    [​IMG]

    Good enough for the next step, which will be attempting to resaw. I have the fence, I have the blade, I have no idea what I'm doing...

    Oh, and - anyone still wondering if they should get a dust cyclone might like to compare these two shots. 1 - the cyclone after jointing the wood above:

    [​IMG]

    And the inside of the vacuum:

    [​IMG]

    It's been a few weeks since I looked in there so I can't guarantee that none of that was there before I started. Impressive!
     
  17. R. Stratenstein

    R. Stratenstein Doctor of Teleocity

    Aug 3, 2010
    Loganville, Ga.
    Nice trolley for the saw! You seem to have unusually square bell bottoms with sequins- photo looks pretty good to me. That saw has a gigantic maw, what's the resaw capacity?

    Great shots of cyclone results! No doubt they are the way to go. My vac and bucket look the same. And besides, for weak minds like mine, it's very entertaining to watch the crud swirl around in the cyclone on its way to the bucket.
     
  18. 2blue2

    2blue2 Tele-Holic

    977
    Jul 20, 2013
    Island of Oahu
    I'm excited by the vortex and new band saw ... nice set up but I really liked the
    Lots of good info and ideas there.

    I think I saw that idea work somewhere else , it was visually entrancing, might of been... in the bathroom.....
     
  19. R. Stratenstein

    R. Stratenstein Doctor of Teleocity

    Aug 3, 2010
    Loganville, Ga.
    Imagine the entertainment value if yer toidy was made of glass and sat a couple of feet higher . .

    Sorry for the slight derail, Rattus, please proceed . . .
     
  20. Reckless Rat

    Reckless Rat Tele-Meister

    339
    Feb 26, 2014
    UK
    I'm totally hip to that jive, Daddy-o. There's around 210mm under the guides, which is a more impressive-sounding way of saying "A little over 8 inches". Basically, big enough for just about anything I will want to do. An 8-inch capacity was one of the mandatory requirements when looking for a new saw, and there was any number of models available in the range 165mm - 175mm which just wasn't *quite* what I wanted. What I wanted was something like a pre-loved SIP 01489 because that ticked all the boxes, but there's not that many of them about. Imagine my surprise when that turned out to be exactly what I got.

    Me, too! I am an absolutely enormous procrastinator, and I will often have things visualised for months or even years in my head before doing anything about it. Then, once I've finally actually done the deed, there is a bewildered 'Why the heck didn't I do this before? This is great!'

    Of course, downunder, you have the build the cyclone so that it goes the other way...


    Under orders from Prof. R. Stratenstein, Simian Chair of Theoretical Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Guitarology, I duly proceeded.

    I carefully unleashed the Honking Big Resaw Blade of Doom from its cable-tied restraints - 3/4 inch, 3 TPI skip-tooth - and wiggled it onto the tyres, then spent 10 minutes or so adjusting the guides and messing around with the tracking. 3/4" is probably a little big for the wheel width on this thing if you want to follow the received wisdom and have the gullet of the blade on the centreline of the wheels, but I'll know that for next time. I got it about as good as it was going to get, then lined up the fence and clamped it down.

    At that point, there seemed little point in not trying it out. So I did. Using gentle forward pressure to let the saw do the work, I eased the two slabs through. The results?

    [​IMG]

    Surprisingly good. Both came out flat in X and Y on the cut face with a thickness of 19.25 - 19.5mm at a bunch of random points along both boards. The 'discard' side is around 4mm on one board, and about 1mm - 4mm on the other (it was lop-sided before I started). I'm very pleased.

    Something of note that may be worth mentioning; I didn't bother tensioning the blade all the way up to the '3/4' mark on the tensioner. At a little over the 1/2" mark it was already as tight as a banjo string, so there didn't seem to be much point trying to go further.

    Next steps: jointing/gluing and... sigh. Sanding.
     
  21. DrASATele

    DrASATele Friend of Leo's

    Jul 6, 2012
    North of Boston
    Awesome, nothing like re-sawing your own wood!

    I'd have a similar picture to show you of my Rikon doing the same thing but this jackwagon tried to run a guitar body through it. They don't like non-square things very much. I now need a new re-saw blade DOH!
     
IMPORTANT: Treat everyone here with respect, no matter how difficult!
No sex, drug, political, religion or hate discussion permitted here.