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Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com
Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com

Brainy Memorial Assortment of Miscellaneous Projects

Discussion in 'Tele Home Depot' started by jimdkc, Aug 1, 2016.

  1. jimdkc

    jimdkc Friend of Leo's

    Age:
    61
    Mar 12, 2009
    Independence, MO
    Well.. here goes! I figured I should at least start my thread on time!

    For my thread, I'm going to be working on a number of projects, many of them unfinished business. I tend to start projects and leave them uncompleted while I move on to something else. I'm going to take this opportunity to tie up some loose ends.

    I think I'm going to start with some projects that aren't even instruments:

    1. I really enjoyed Brainy's breadbox pickup winder build. I'm going to finish my pickup winder. It's functional, but not completed. It's kinda thrown together on a hastily assembled frame. My intentions are to complete the enclosure... including tweed covering!

    2. I've had a Gaussmeter project designed, partially in my head and partially on paper, and I've purchased most (if not all) of the parts needed. Brainy seemed to enjoy my "sciencey" projects, including my foray into plating, as well as my input on various pickup winder projects at TDPRI. My intention here, rather than present a completed design and build, will be to build it in a tutorial fashion starting with a very basic Hall Effect sensor circuit, explaining how it works, and gradually flesh it out into a finished instrument, explaining as I go what each addition adds. This should result in what I think will be a relatively inexpensive, fairly accurate, portable, easy to use instrument which will be a handy aid in building guitar pickups.

    3. Since I learned that Brainy loved effect pedals, I'm going to build a simple fuzz pedal. I've always intended to build pedals, but have never gotten around to it. I've studied them for quite a while and have amassed a pretty good collection of schematics, so it's about time I actually built one!

    We'll see how those go, then I may do some guitar refinishing, too!
     

  2. 2blue2

    2blue2 Tele-Afflicted

    Jul 20, 2013
    Island of Oahu
    Wow! such an ambitious list. The Gauss-O-Meter will have me watching. Fun!
     
    Mbechmann likes this.

  3. nosmo

    nosmo Friend of Leo's

    Jan 31, 2012
    Lake Jackson, TX

  4. DrASATele

    DrASATele Poster Extraordinaire

    Jul 6, 2012
    North of Boston

  5. R. Stratenstein

    R. Stratenstein Doctor of Teleocity

    Aug 3, 2010
    Loganville, Ga.
    Is your winder going to involver stripper poles, gaudy colored lights, and foodstuffs like Brainy's?
     
    DrASATele likes this.

  6. jimdkc

    jimdkc Friend of Leo's

    Age:
    61
    Mar 12, 2009
    Independence, MO
    I've been looking... those USB stripper pole dancers are nowhere to be found any more!

    ... I take that back... there is one on eBay for $80...
     

  7. mPacT

    mPacT Tele-Holic

    880
    Dec 23, 2014
    Burbank, CA
    A Guassmeter would be very handy!
     

  8. MM73

    MM73 Tele-Afflicted

    Age:
    44
    Feb 24, 2015
    South Lyon, MI
    Really interested in the pickup winder and fuzz pedal!

    Gaussmeter? I need to Google that, and will be right back.
     
    John Nicholas likes this.

  9. MM73

    MM73 Tele-Afflicted

    Age:
    44
    Feb 24, 2015
    South Lyon, MI
    I'm back.

    The gaussmeter looks interesting...that is me politely saying I haven't a clue how you use them, but I'm gonna watch and see if I might learn something in spite of myself.
     
    John Nicholas likes this.

  10. BluesBlooded

    BluesBlooded Friend of Leo's

    Count me in on the gaussmeter interested list. I love to learn new stuff.
     

  11. R. Stratenstein

    R. Stratenstein Doctor of Teleocity

    Aug 3, 2010
    Loganville, Ga.
    I'm waiting for Jims post that he's received the USB stripper. You guys have your priorities amiss.:rolleyes:
     

  12. R. Stratenstein

    R. Stratenstein Doctor of Teleocity

    Aug 3, 2010
    Loganville, Ga.
    Deleted
    very funny response, but wrong thread. DOH!
     
    kwerk likes this.

  13. mPacT

    mPacT Tele-Holic

    880
    Dec 23, 2014
    Burbank, CA
    Jim, you do the Guassmeter build thread and I will send you some knobs.
     

  14. jimdkc

    jimdkc Friend of Leo's

    Age:
    61
    Mar 12, 2009
    Independence, MO
    OK... Gaussmeter seems to be a popular request (believe me, Rick... I'm kicking myself for not buying a USB Stripper back when they sold for under $10!)

    The basic component of my Gaussmeter is going to be a Hall effect sensor integrated circuit. A Hall effect sensor is a semiconductor device (like a transistor) which provides a varying output based on the presence of magnetic fields.

    But, not just any Hall effect sensor will do. There are 2 basic types of them: Linear Hall effect sensors and Hall effect switches.

    You may be familiar with Hall effect switches if you have followed various pickup winder threads on TDPRI. A Hall effect switch is a digital device. It usually puts out either 0 volts, or a voltage close to the power supply voltage. It may, for example, put out 0 volts DC when there is no magnetic field nearby, then switch to 12 volts DC when a magnet comes near, then switch back to 0 volts DC when the magnet is moved away. If that magnet is attached to the platen of a pickup winder, the output of the Hall Effect switch could be used to count turns, or it could be connected to a tachometer to measure the speed of the winder motor. This is NOT what we want for our Gaussmeter!

    What we need is a linear (also known as "ratiometric") Hall effect sensor. This type of sensor will vary its output voltage at a predictable rate depending on the strength and polarity of a nearby magnetic field.

    The sensor that I've chosen for our Gaussmeter is the Allegro MicroSystems A1302. There are a number of reasons that I've selected this sensor:

    It operates at 5 volts DC. This is a relatively low voltage that is easily obtainable from a battery supply.

    It is inexpensive. Under $2.00... maybe way under!

    It is readily available. You can purchase it from a number of electronics parts vendors such as:

    Jameco Electronics
    DigiKey Electronics
    Newark Electronics

    They all have them in stock, and they are under $2.00 each.

    But, my favorite way to buy these (and many other electronic parts) is on eBay. I bought 5 of them for about $3.00 (shipped!). Just search for "A1302 hall effect sensor" on eBay. You'll find dozens of sellers. Many of them are in China or Hong Kong, but you can also find US vendors... You'll pay a bit more from the US vendors, but you'll get a bit faster delivery. Most of the parts I've ordered from Asia arrive in about 2 weeks, and sometimes as fast as 1 week.

    And finally, the sensitivity of this model sensor is relatively high, which will give us a good, useable range on our Gaussmeter.

    The basic specifications of the Allegro A1302:

    Operating Voltage: 4.5 to 6.0 VDC

    Ratiometric Rail-to-Rail Output (This means that the output voltage can range from near 0 VDC to near the supply voltage. Typically within 0.2 volts)

    Quiescent Output Voltage: 2.5 VDC (This means with NO magnetic field present, the output is 2.5 VDC, or half of the supply voltage)

    Magnetic Sensitivity: 1.3 millivolts per Gauss (This determines the amount of output voltage change in the presence of a magnetic field.)

    I've attached a copy of the A1301-A1302 Datasheet (The A1301 is a more sensitive, but not as wide range, version of the same sensor.)
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Aug 6, 2016
    kwerk likes this.

  15. kwerk

    kwerk Poster Extraordinaire

    Feb 22, 2010
    New Zealand
    Fantastic! What's more, so far I understand it too! :rolleyes:
     
    mPacT likes this.

  16. mPacT

    mPacT Tele-Holic

    880
    Dec 23, 2014
    Burbank, CA

  17. jimdkc

    jimdkc Friend of Leo's

    Age:
    61
    Mar 12, 2009
    Independence, MO
    So, in this entry, I'll discuss 2 more aspects of our Gaussmeter: The Power Supply and the Display.

    Let's do the Display first. This will be quick. I've designed the Gaussmeter to use a standard Digital Multimeter (DMM) as a display. It doesn't even need to be a very fancy DMM. In fact, in my demos I'm going to be using one of these:

    [​IMG]

    That's a $5.99 Cen-Tech 7-Function DMM from Harbor Freight, Item #90899, 98025, or 69096. In fact, if you check their webpage... You should see that they have a coupon to get one of these FREE this weekend!

    http://www.harborfreight.com

    You can use virtually ANY digital multimeter. You can pick one up from any hardware store or from WalMart for under $10. You can also use a $500 lab-grade bench multimeter if you want!

    For the Gaussmeter power supply, I've chosen to use a standard 9Vdc rectangular transistor radio battery along with a 78L05 voltage regulator integrated circuit.

    The battery itself will be housed in a plastic battery box with a built-in switch. I will be incorporating this battery box into the instrument design. I found the battery box on eBay by searching for "9v battery box with switch". I paid $3.89 (shipped) for 5 of them from a Chinese vendor. If you buy from a US vendor, you'll probably pay a couple bucks, plus a few bucks more for shipping, but you'll get it faster (but it still came from China!)

    The 9 volts from the battery will be regulated to 5 volts to drive the Hall effect sensor. Since we don't need much current and we want to keep the instrument relatively small, I've chosen a 78L05 regulator. This is a 100 milliamp version of the ubiquitous 7805 5 volt 1 amp regulator that many of you are familiar with. This is in a smaller plastic package, and it looks identical to a small transistor. Again, you can get these from virtually any electronics parts vendors, or they are widely available on eBay. (I bought 20 for $3.19, shipped... less than 16 cents each!)

    I will also include an LED power indicator to easily tell when the circuit is switched on.

    Tomorrow (later today, actually!), I'll breadboard some circuitry to show you!
     
    Last edited: Aug 6, 2016
    mPacT likes this.

  18. BluesBlooded

    BluesBlooded Friend of Leo's

    This is awesome Jim.Thanks!
     

  19. R. Stratenstein

    R. Stratenstein Doctor of Teleocity

    Aug 3, 2010
    Loganville, Ga.
    Brilliant, Jim, my sticking point was getting a reasonably priced voltage meter and display. Putting together long lists of discrete parts, looking at lcd circuits and displays . . . DURR. . Good ole Harbor Freight had the whole thing fully assembled for $5 right under my nose.
     

  20. LeftFinger

    LeftFinger Tele-Holic

    954
    Aug 16, 2015
    Saskatchewan
    Add one to your misc project list:D

    Scrounge one out of a 1978 Chrysler distributor.If they haven't all been crushed by now:cool:
     

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