Best year for vintage Tele

Discussion in 'Vintage Tele Discussion Forum (pre-1974)' started by Edvard123, Aug 12, 2018.

  1. Edvard123

    Edvard123 TDPRI Member

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    Hello guys!

    After few Tele from Custom Shop, and Master Builds I decided to try a vintage one. Guitars before 1965 are too expensive so I think about Tele from 67/68/69 - is there any difference between them? Wich one you can recommend? Maybe there could be something interesting in 70's?

    Is it true that some guitars from 1967 are finished in nitro?


    Thanks for your help!
     
  2. chomps

    chomps TDPRI Member

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    I think each guitar is unique. You can have great, average, and bad in every year. I had a ‘65 which was lifeless and heavy and a ‘68 which is killer. I also had a different ‘68 which was average. The only thing I don’t like about 68s is that year they stopped recessing the Ferrels flush on the back. They used nitro till mid 68 I think. All the nitro maple cap necks and bodies age beautifully. Try a bunch if you can and your will find your match.
     
  3. sonicdom

    sonicdom Tele-Meister

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    I used to have an olympic white '68 with maple cap. A killer guitar. I played some other '67 / '68 and even '69 teles that where really good guitars. The change to Nitro was sometime in '69. I used to have a '69 with nitro body (CAR faded to copper) but poly neck.
     
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  4. Totally_Tod

    Totally_Tod Tele-Meister

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    Don’t bother looking for anything other than a 1956. Those are the only ones worth playing.
     
  5. alathIN

    alathIN Tele-Holic

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    My uneducated take: there's variation in every year's crop of guitars, some better than others, some might warp strangely or get an ill-advised mod, while others are taken care of.
    By the time a guitar is 20 years old, whatever original build characteristics good or bad will have been overtaken by what happened in those 20+ years.
    Vintage gets you:
    1) high cost
    2) potentially high or higher resale value
    3) perhaps a boost of inspiration or mojo that makes you want to play more and thus get better
    but I do not believe it is a reliable way to ensure you're getting a good playing good sounding instrument.

    Whatever year you think was a great year, there were 5 guitars that were the 5 worst ones made that year - even if not obvious at the time, like some oddball grain configuration that creates problems with age.

    If you're looking for a player, play a bunch of them without looking at the year first.
    If you're looking for vintage value, consult a pricing guide or the sales data from Reverb.
    Sometimes the two go together, but I'm not convinced either one reliably predicts the other.
     
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  6. rich815

    rich815 Friend of Leo's

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    So like now? :D
     
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  7. brookdalebill

    brookdalebill Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

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    If money is no object, my favorite years are 55-56 for maple necks, and 59-60 for rosewood.
    I prefer the “white guard” era.
    They are “twangier” for lack of a better word, than the earlier black-guard guitars, and somewhat less expensive.
    I prefer the lighter color blonde, too.
    I generally prefer rosewood fingerboard Teles, all-around.
    59-60 Teles often have a somewhat larger/wider fingerboard.
    I prefer what I describe as the”dampening” effect rosewood seems to have on the attack of notes/chords.
    The guitars seem somewhat less twangy.
    Your personal results may vary.
    Rosewood fingerboard vintage Teles are still less expensive on the vintage market than maple.
     
  8. titan uranus

    titan uranus Tele-Meister

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    My '13 is a monster, but you'd have to be 5 years old for it to be vintage.
     
  9. GM60466

    GM60466 TDPRI Member

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    I like my '62
     
  10. chomps

    chomps TDPRI Member

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    My Dad always said “50% of the doctors out there finished in the bottom half of their class”.
     
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  11. E Baxter Put

    E Baxter Put Tele-Meister

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    Nevermind...
     
    Last edited: Aug 13, 2018
  12. Tedzo

    Tedzo Tele-Meister

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    It's not a matter of affordability...it's about the best year for the tele. Just because one can't afford a Blackguard doesn't mean that they are inferior to 60's guitars. I'm no expert, but the '53 neck seems to be just fine as a classic.

    pg2.jpg pg3.jpg photo 2.JPG IMG_6859.JPG
     
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  13. Dacious

    Dacious Poster Extraordinaire

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    A lot of solid and metallic finish guitars from the early sixties were acrylic lacquer, often under nitro. When Du Pont introduced acrylic lacquer for colour stability so did Fender. That probably happened very late 50s.

    http://www.guitarhq.com/fenderc.html

    Under paint, the sanding sealer used on every Fender ever made was under both. It's a non-volatile material not thinned by acetone. They used it because it reduces undercoat and topcoat which are very exoexpens by comparison. Otherwise paint sinks into wood for several coats until it stops - that 'sink' is called orange peel.

    Fender started changing to poly around 65/66 for some finishes. Headstocks go orange because poly adversely affected the stickers used, so they were overshot with nitro.

    You see a lot of Teles like my old 78 had orange headstock faces and 21st fret because they were coated in nitro - seen a few double dot 12th frets with orange too.
     
  14. cjp60

    cjp60 TDPRI Member

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    Some good advice so far. Just be patient and try as many as you can if possible.
     
  15. netgear69

    netgear69 Tele-Afflicted

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    So why is that ?
     
  16. Edvard123

    Edvard123 TDPRI Member

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    Thanks a lot guys! It's really hard to find a nice, fully original Tele from late 60's in Europe (in good price ofc).

    I've decided to buy the 58 Custom Shop Reissue (I am going to make a NGD tomorrow) and in the meantime I will be looking for vintage one!
     
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