best live vocal setup

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by ndcaster, May 12, 2019.

  1. ndcaster

    ndcaster Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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    put an SM58 on a stick and call it done?

    tweak you some EQ?

    add a little compression?

    add enough delay to thicken but not separate?

    add plate reverb until you notice it, then back it off just till you don't?

    add plate reverb with predelay and pretend the singer is Ray Price?

    curious about who does what to get great lead vocal sound
     
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  2. brookdalebill

    brookdalebill Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

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    That would do it, for a singer like me.
    I occasionally get to play with really good singers (which I ain’t).
    Sometimes with those guys and gals, I just set them “flat” on the EQ, and don’t add any effects at all.
    I play with two great singers, one guy, one gal, in two different bands these days.
    They’re inspiring!
     
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  3. Papa Joe

    Papa Joe Friend of Leo's

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    SM58 with a touch of reverb..I like to set my own mix..I want the mic a bit hot so I can use it as an instrument..I set it with good clear presence..When I'm pronouncing an S I want it to sound like an S.. Not mumbled..
     
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  4. Whatizitman

    Whatizitman Tele-Afflicted

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    I’m too lazy to figure out exact frequencies. But my rule of thumb is to roll off enough low frequencies to keep vocals from competing with the instruments and sounding like mud. All mics suffer from proximity effect. And the louder the mix, the more a singer has the tendency to eat the mic. Compression and a tad of reverb or delay can be nice. But if you don’t have those and are limited by a cheap PA (which is typically always the case for me), a significant improvement can be made in vocals just by cutting some lows.
     
  5. Old Deaf Roadie

    Old Deaf Roadie Tele-Holic

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    IMO, 100% of what you mentioned depends on the room. Many times the room is lively enough that you don't need much help with ambience, but putting a bit of verb in the lead vocalist's wedge works wonders in getting him or her to shut up about the monitors.
    My "A" rig likes a high pass filter at about 165 Hz for vocal clarity. Most other EQ is flat-ish.
     
  6. Chanan

    Chanan Tele-Meister

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    That’s pretty much what I do when I run sound in our synagogue. First thing I do is highpass all the lows, and then start to roll em back in to taste - HP usually sits around 100-150. Depending on the singer I might sculpt the mids a bit, otherwise I’ll just add a bit of little top end air.

    A bit of reverb - I usually have a plate going and some type of hall under it. Not really sure if it’s even making a difference, but I’ve done it that way for a long time. Sometimes I’ll add some delay to thicken things up, but it’s also pretty negligible.

    And then compression shaving off a couple dB. I run the behringer Xair system - so I use their native compressor as well as their Fairchild clone, which I think sounds pretty solid.

    I also find for a lot of vocalists I like a 57 more than a 58, but nobody ever wants to sing through one...
     
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  7. Paul in Colorado

    Paul in Colorado Telefied Ad Free Member

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    I have several good microphones. An SM 58 is my last choice. My PA doesn't have compression, so I just tweak the EQ until it sounds good. Usually I'll roll off some low and boost a little of the highs. I like to start with a PA that's been properly set up and dialed in before I get there. Either that, or I'll do that before the rest of the band gets there.
     
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  8. ndcaster

    ndcaster Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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    hey Papa, I use a Sennheiser e935, which is hotter than a 58, has more range, and really good for me (baritone)
     
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  9. rangercaster

    rangercaster Friend of Leo's

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    Every singer is different and so is every room ... You need a good place to start and go from there...
     
  10. schmee

    schmee Poster Extraordinaire

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    Speaker quality. It's a huge thing for good vocal sound. You do need enough power, but not that much really for clubs. I moved on from SM58's a few years back to Sennheiser. Huge difference. But heck the 58's work fine.
    Outdoors we use powered subwoofers and powered mains. (All high end JBL) We could use a cheap little mixer really. It's amazing how much the subs add.... even though vocal range isn't down there , they add a big sound for some reason.
     
  11. Guitarteach

    Guitarteach Poster Extraordinaire

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    Wireless IEMs

    Might put a touch of compression on the input on the desk...Invariably have a bit of subtle plate reverb and delay from Lexicon fx.
     
  12. thegeezer

    thegeezer Tele-Afflicted

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    We don’t need a big PA. But having a bit more than you’ll need and quality components has always worked for me.

    I use EV speakers, XLS series Class D Crown amps and a Yamaha board with SM58s. The board has compressors and effects. I bought the speakers lightly used. I have about $1500 in the whole thing and nothing weighs more than 35 lbs.

    I can dial in crystal clear vocals with a hint of verb and necessary compression for the various sized rooms we play pretty quickly and stick the kick through it if needed.

    Honestly, over the years I’ve learned it’s just using good enough gear to project clear vocals and keep them out of the mud zone where too many end up.
     
  13. memorex

    memorex Friend of Leo's

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    I use an EV ND767. It's a little brighter than a Shure 58, which my tired, old voice needs. I run it through a TC-Helicon Duplicator with the doubler turned off, a little bit of room reverb, a little bit of auto-tune, and the tone function, which does gating, compressing, de-essing, and EQ all at once. It's simple and it sounds pretty good.
     
  14. KC

    KC Friend of Leo's

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    we were just talking at practice last night how much we all love our Mackie 808 powered mixers, a bar band standard for twenty years running. For my voice, which is not a thing of beauty, I like to run a 57 with an A2WS windscreen so I can get right up on the capsule for some bass boost. Little reverb & we're off to the races. The other advantage of the 57 over the 58 is that you get a hotter signal out of it, again just due to the proximity effect, and so can get a nice strong monitor signal without having to worry about feedback.
     
  15. schmee

    schmee Poster Extraordinaire

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    Yeah those 808's are workhorses. So is the Peavey version of the 800 or 1200 watt powered mixer. You can run them hard forever. Heavy units. Being old I went to the Yamaha Cl D similar mixer now, the damn thing only weighs maybe 15 lbs! It's been fine so far. I think a bit flatter response sounding than the 808 or Peavey was. But it's good and clean in the band mix.
     
  16. Papa Joe

    Papa Joe Friend of Leo's

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    Uh huh, I've been using the SM 58s for many years..I'm used to them and know how to set them up for my style of vocals..
     
  17. 1955

    1955 Poster Extraordinaire

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    I start flat and dry. If there is eq, I’ll often sweep and cut a little between 200-500hz if needed. Add some reverb. Every venue is different, some you don’t need to do anything at all.
     
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  18. ndcaster

    ndcaster Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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    that seems to be key from what I hear, to have experience with a constant set of mics so you get a baseline

    I appreciate your replies since I'm new to this singing out front thing
     
  19. alnico357

    alnico357 Tele-Holic

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    SM 58. Don't use the graphic EQ to create problems. Set it flat and don't touch it unless needed. Reverb is great.
     
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  20. Ron R

    Ron R Friend of Leo's

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    We've been using a pair of Blue Encore 300s out front (drummer uses a Shure headset mic, in the interest of limiting just how much his drums get picked up since he is not a particularly powerful singer and needs more boost). The Blues have been fantastic.
     
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