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Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com
Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com

Avoiding rough spots when sanding down a body

Discussion in 'Tele Home Depot' started by newuser1, Oct 8, 2017.

  1. RickyRicardo

    RickyRicardo Friend of Leo's

    Mar 27, 2012
    Calgary, Alberta
    A belt sander like that will take off way too much material in the blink of an eye. A lot of TDPRI'ers use the Ridgid ROSS from Home Depot with a spindle sander and belt sander that are stationery. One of the most useful tools in the shop. The belt sander on that is what you'd need if you want a proper one. Use a flat block of wood and sandpaper. You have it down to the line already. I've done the same thing with a spindle sander that you have and a few minutes of hand sanding will smooth it all out. Mark some pencil lines in your divots and sand until they disappear.
     
    newuser1 likes this.

  2. newuser1

    newuser1 Tele-Meister

    Age:
    46
    208
    Mar 1, 2017
    Toronto
    Thanks Richard,

    I'll go with the hand sanding. When finishing the line by hand to remove imperfections, do you start with a small grit and then move up?
     

  3. RickyRicardo

    RickyRicardo Friend of Leo's

    Mar 27, 2012
    Calgary, Alberta
    I usually do 120 or 150 at this point. I don't do any final sanding until all the cavities and holes are done. Then I use 220 for final sanding. Chances are you'll get a scratch or tiny ding so there's no use in final sanding until it's time to apply the finish.

    What you want to do at this point is make sure everything is smooth and flat - especially if you're doing a round over on the edges - and then you can do your routing and drilling. That's how I do it but it's up to you.
     

  4. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

    Mar 30, 2003
    Ontario County

    Not really....look for a 4 x 36 stationary one if you can't afford a 6 x 48" stationary one, which would be my preference because of the larger table surface and support.

    The tables are usually movable to support the work at the belt.
    https://www.kmstools.com/king-canada-6-x-48-belt-disc-sander-5767
     
    Last edited: Oct 12, 2017

  5. TRexF16

    TRexF16 Friend of Leo's

    Apr 4, 2011
    Tucson
    You are best off hand sanding the outside edges than using any machine, if you're asking about cleaning up after the router. Nothing is more controllable nor safer.

    Rex
     

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