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Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com
Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com

Are Nash Guitars consistently great?

Discussion in 'Other T-Types and Partscasters' started by Inuitdream, Jul 1, 2012.

  1. JohnK24

    JohnK24 Friend of Leo's

    Mar 16, 2003
    Western PA
    Did they have the "Fender" logo on the headstock ? Seems a large number of the Nash casters I see have Fender on them...funny, huh ?
     

  2. Doug 54

    Doug 54 Poster Extraordinaire

    Dec 12, 2004
    Ohio
    A few yrs ago Tonequest did a great interview with Mr. Nash.
    He has an excellent knowledge of wood and their characteristics.

    Ditto for pup selection. He seemed a bit frustrated in the whole operation. (From the suppliers and dealers to the sweat equity of doing an intensive job).

    He mentioned his wife several times, who he says has actually kept him in business, when he wants to throw the towel in.

    I think his prices are realistic for the amount of work done and high quality components.

    (no, I dont own one and dont like relic-ness).

    It can be a crap shoot in using the best wood and components on an electric!! Joe Glazer fairly much got out of the custom building after he built a guitar for Brent Mason using the BEST wood and components: It was a turd.
    My ex EJ Strat was a good example of that.

    Acoustics: Much more controllable good results wth the woods and bracing.

    Leave Nash alone.

    /

    /
     

  3. Toto'sDad

    Toto'sDad Telefied Ad Free Member

    Jun 21, 2011
    Bakersfield
    Joe Glazer fairly much got out of the custom building after he built a guitar for Brent Mason using the BEST wood and components: It was a turd.

    Leave Nash alone.

    Are these statements supportive? Are you saying Nash should be left alone until he builds a turd for Brent Mason?
     

  4. Doug 54

    Doug 54 Poster Extraordinaire

    Dec 12, 2004
    Ohio
    Glazer was talking the amount of time and resources used.
    Many other guitars were built prior to Mason using the same high falutin woods, etc. and he felt the sonic return was so-so.

    I think his perspective is, on an electric there is still quite a bit of 'chance' in getting really good results inspite of using the best.

    Scientifically these statements are supportive!! I saw it on the net!!

    Nash can have a sonic turd(s) as much as anyone else in the more $$ realm.
    That's why playing in person is important. Attack Nash-- and you might as well attack Sadowsky and many others, even those making their own bodies and necks.

    An acoustic's good sonics are much more controllable.

    .
     

  5. jklotz

    jklotz Tele-Afflicted

    Jan 10, 2012
    Atlanta, GA
    I have to agree, leave the guy alone if you don't like what he does. What's the point of bashing him?
     

  6. Timo

    Timo Tele-Meister

    112
    Oct 25, 2006
    Montreal, Canada
    I've got 3 Nash 63 T Style guitars right now, two with single coils and one with a humbucker in the neck, and I have played lots of Fender teles, ranging from Mexican to Custom shop. I'd have to say, with the exception of the custom shop guitars- which usually cost twice what I've paid for my Nash guitars- that my Nash guitars are better than anything I've played.
     

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    Last edited: Dec 13, 2012

  7. blues dues

    blues dues Tele-Meister

    489
    Nov 26, 2011
    Let me get this straight, you think those that whine incessantly in threads about relics do it because they care about guitars? I don't get that. I do get what he's saying in that I don't understand why people do it either. If you're not into relics then move on to something you do like. I hate shiny brand new guitars but I don't voice that in NGD threads with shiny guitars. I find it utterly hilarious when people post threads about how upset they are that their guitar got a scratch or a nick & how can they fix it, clearly they don't gig or travel much. The bottom line is he's right that there are LARGE numbers of people that bash him & other builders like him that do relics & it doesn't make sense. Any doubts about this can be quelled if you research any relic thread here & it's clear the haters come flying out of the woodwork. It's a finish option, get over it.
     

  8. moonman2

    moonman2 Tele-Meister

    263
    Apr 2, 2012
    England
    so how do you identify if a guitar is a genuine Nash ?

    (seems like a easy brand to forge)
     

  9. Telemarkman

    Telemarkman Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

    Age:
    70
    Dec 6, 2005
    Norway
    It might be as simple as this: A LARGE number of people don't see him as a builder - just an assembler and relicer ... And not even a good one at the latter.
     

  10. H. Mac

    H. Mac Friend of Leo's

    May 26, 2012
    Atlanta, Georgia
    The answer to the question in the first sentence is probably "no," but then again, there is a world of difference between those who "whine incessantly . . . about relics," and those who merely comment about guitar finishes, or their frets, neck radii, etc. To put it differently, what you perceive as "incessant whining," might be perceived by me or by the next guy as simply "commenting."

    As far as my "reseach[ing] any relic thread here," I've read many, and think that some comments are legit, some are amusing, some are boring, some are less than legit, but I don't characterize any as "incessant whinning," because it's too easy to quit reading a comment that's in poor taste and move to next the comment.

    If you're attempting to suggest that commenting on finishes is somehow distinguishable from commenting on issues such as poly v. nitro; single coil v. humbucker; maple v. rosewood; gig bag or hard case, etc., then it seems that you and I will not agree. But we're not gonna fight a duel, and at the end of the day, the TDPRI will have room for lots of opinions, and for lots of agreements and disagreements. Besides, we might agree on something else in another thread on another day.

    Nash guitars play and sound good, and if Mr. Nash offered a less reliced line of guitars, I might buy one. But that's a compliment, since there's a lot of guitars that I think don't sound good and don't play properly. I understand that Mr. Nash doesn't need me to determine his business plan, and I certainly don't think I'm bashing him. Frankly, I don't think I've said anything unkind about a guitar builder, or about any non-guitar builder in this forum or anywhere.

    A finish option is just a finish option, and it's not something that anyone needs to "get over." The same is true of opinions, even the opinions that we don't agree with.
     

  11. xMercury69x

    xMercury69x Friend of Leo's

    Nov 9, 2012
    Toronto
    "Leave Nash alooooone!"
     

    Attached Files:


  12. twangjeff

    twangjeff Tele-Holic

    956
    Feb 2, 2010
    Houston, TX

    I meant you could get bodies and necks that are already finished. I used Mighty Mite as an example, but there are a ton of places you could substitute. Heck if you go on ebay you will sometimes see MJT bodies going well under $200. So I still feel like my question is valid... For a $1200 assembly fee what does Nash do for you besides make the guitar look ugly?

    Maybe me and that kid down the street that set's up my guitars just don't get it because we aren't pros like you obviously are. ;)

    For the record... I never said anything about the quality of the guitars so if I any offense was taken, none was intended.
     

  13. H. Mac

    H. Mac Friend of Leo's

    May 26, 2012
    Atlanta, Georgia
    I'm not so sure the question is valid. Even assuming that the $1,200 quoted is correct, the question, particularly the "assembly fee" part, assumes purported "facts" that are hard to swallow.

    Component parts must be selected, transported, (and for a business, placed in an inventory for tax purposes), stored, and actually purchased from vendors, and these things require time, credit, communication, documentation, and document retention.

    I'm not gonna get into overhead, such as electricity, business tax, licensure, reporting, insurance, computer support, phone bills, accounting, etc.

    Retailers have to be selected, and both commercial contracts and a credit system have to be set up between the manufacturer/distributor and the individual retailers (and since these are ordinarily interstate transactions, complaince with federal law is required, in addition to compliance with state law) and again, the guitars have to be transported, inventoried, and insured.

    The retailers love us of course, and want to give us free guitars, but they also have to put bread on their tables, so the add their share to the price.

    When a guitar sells, the retailer handles the money or credit card purchase, takes a cut, pays tax, and sends the rest on to the distributor, who also takes a cut and pays tax, and afterward, the money goes to the builder (maybe Mr. Nash), who has to pay his accountant, pay his bills, pay taxes, and use all or part of the remainder to buy more components.

    My guess is that few guitar builders get rich, and most work really, really hard for not too much money.

    So, how exactly is the question "valid?"
     

  14. brookdalebill

    brookdalebill Telefied Ad Free Member

    Age:
    60
    Nov 15, 2009
    Austin, Tx
    Every Nash I ever plugged in sounded great.
    I think it is their greatest charm.
    Like all guitars they vary in weight and feel, but the parts seem to
    "come together" well.
     

  15. twangjeff

    twangjeff Tele-Holic

    956
    Feb 2, 2010
    Houston, TX
    Last response and then I'll let this go. Geez you say something about somebody's guitar and it's like you insulted their sister...

    The question is: What does Nash do that I couldn't do myself with bought parts at a much lower cost?

    The question is NOT: Is it OK for Nash to make a profit?

    The guy can charge whatever he pleases for his guitars and if people will pay, then thats great for him, that's not what I'm questioning. Again, I never said anything about the quality of the guitars. In fact, I mentioned in my first post that I had played several Nash guitars and thought that they were pretty good.

    So yes it is a valid question. Obviously Nash has to pay taxes, make payroll, etc. But again, I am not saying I am going to go into business trying to make partscasters. Just simply that if I am a guy that wants to buy a Tele what would make me want to buy a Nash as opposed to a partscaster?
     

  16. willspear

    willspear Tele-Holic

    541
    Apr 29, 2012
    portland
    It's clear the answer to that is what ears hear and hands feel.


    That's like asking why buy fender over squire?

    Why buy food at a restaurant when you could prepare food at home?

    You are paying more for the expertise of the crafter, Convenience and or laziness.


    Most parts casters that wind up on sites like eBay, Craigslist or probably even here suck balls. You are paying for someone to do a task well. If you don't see value in it you don't spend the money.
     
    Last edited: Dec 14, 2012

  17. coldengray

    coldengray Tele-Meister

    Age:
    39
    226
    Sep 30, 2009
    Charlotte, NC
    I did a check on eBay and found several Nash T-52s with "light" relicing...they looked much better than some of his other stuff.
     

  18. H. Mac

    H. Mac Friend of Leo's

    May 26, 2012
    Atlanta, Georgia
    It was not my intent to generate confusion. However, in your post above, you said:

    "So I still feel like my question is valid... For a $1200 assembly fee what does Nash do for you besides make the guitar look ugly?

    and the points in my post (above) were that there seemed to be no basis for your suggestion that there is "a $1,200 assembly fee," with Nash guitars, and that there are a lot of potential legit business costs that might be wise to at least consider.

    So it's not "Geez you say something about somebody's guitar and it's like you insulted their sister...", it's that you made a statement about a $1,200 assembly fee as though it were a fact.
     

  19. stevopacnw

    stevopacnw Former Member

    79
    Dec 31, 2011
    Northwest
    Not to de-rail the main thread into more "bolter & finisher" discussion, but I want to see one Fender Builder who has logged & milled the trees, dried the wood, programmed and ran the CNC router to cut the bodies and necks (or cut them manually with a respectible fit & finish), made the fiber board/poles/wire before winding his own pickups, made the fret wire (not cut it off the roll, actually produce the raw wire), and casted/rolled/finished the hardware for one single guitar before finishing and bolting the guitar together. If any single person at Fender has done all that for any one guitar Fender has ever put its name on, I'll concede that Nash and the slew of small shop custom builders are just "bolters & finishers".

    Outside of that, Fender is a large firm of bolters & finishers that happens to source some (but not all) of their own raw materials to build their end product in my mind.
     

  20. stevopacnw

    stevopacnw Former Member

    79
    Dec 31, 2011
    Northwest
    I think it's pretty simple: Can you and are you willing to invest the labor into building an instrument that meets your own standards vs. trusting him to do it for a higher price?
     

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