Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com
Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com
Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com

Anyone made a jarrah neck?

Discussion in 'Tele Home Depot' started by Jackadder, Nov 22, 2017.

  1. Jackadder

    Jackadder Tele-Meister

    383
    Jun 12, 2014
    West Australia
    Jarrah is apparently a sonically 'dead' wood......but I bought a quarter-sawn piece the other day that rings like a dinner gong. Looks funky, too. Wondering whether it is worth the effort to make a neck - anyone have any jarrah stories they'd care to share?

    jarrah.jpg
     
    Crafty Fox likes this.

  2. Mase

    Mase TDPRI Member

    82
    Apr 20, 2016
    Australia
    No. Id like to see you do it though. Jarrah is one of the few good looking timbers i can get hold of at the right price. Any time I have brought it up in conversation the negative comments have been about its weight, rather than 'sonics'. I can say it make good fingerboards.
    Best of luck if you give it a try.
     

  3. Davecam48

    Davecam48 Friend of Leo's Gold Supporter

    Age:
    69
    Dec 31, 2009
    Queensland Australia

    I don't believe that! I believe that the density of the wood determines the "sonics" of said timber ( and jarrah can be very dense) but in an "electric" situation I think "sustain" over rides "sonics" as the pickups will change the sound anyway from the acoustic sound of the unplugged guitar to the amplified sound. Every process that audio goes through detracts something from the "original" sound.

    I think the most important thing when making a neck is to have no voids at all within the confines of the neck itself which I believe gives increased sustain which is what I try to achieve.

    Sound travels better in dense material than in air. Stick your ear to one end of it and tap the other end with your finger. The ear on the wood will hear it louder than the air ear, and a micro second earlier.

    So if you don't want that horrible bit of jarrah I'd take it of your hands!!!!!:lol:

    You could build a beautiful jarrah neck Jack!

    DC
     

  4. mux164

    mux164 Tele-Meister

    302
    Jul 28, 2013
    australia
    I've made a jarrah neck through with pine laminations, and a jarrah fretboard.

    I don't think it's dead

    Also made a jarrah topped les paul IMG_7329.JPG IMG_0641.JPG

    Oh and a jarrah topped firebird ukulele IMG_7180.JPG IMG_7183.JPG
     

  5. mux164

    mux164 Tele-Meister

    302
    Jul 28, 2013
    australia
    Also it's hard as buggery
     

  6. Mase

    Mase TDPRI Member

    82
    Apr 20, 2016
    Australia
    Hey Mux, nice uke ! When I've used Jarrah for fingerboards i have finished it like maple, as it's not as hard as rosewood.
    Have you used it on an instrument without any clear coat ? I'd like to use it without a finish but haven't wanted to risk it.
     

  7. mux164

    mux164 Tele-Meister

    302
    Jul 28, 2013
    australia
    Not yet I've finished it with either acrylic or bondall satin varnish
     

  8. Mase

    Mase TDPRI Member

    82
    Apr 20, 2016
    Australia
    Cheers Mux. i should just give it a punt and see what happens.
     

  9. mux164

    mux164 Tele-Meister

    302
    Jul 28, 2013
    australia
    What's the worse that can happen, you sand it back and then coat it
     

  10. dazzaman

    dazzaman Tele-Afflicted

    Aug 12, 2011
    Copenhagen, Denmark
    I have always wondered if it would make a good substitute for rosewood, especially now there's is the change with CITES. When growing up I saw quite a lot of it, and I was always told that it was used (even in the 1970s) for railway sleepers. All the stuff I saw that wasn't finished soon went (especially if left outside) an unattractive grey colour. I do have a turned bowl that has retained its colour, but no idea what finish was on it. I am sure that it has the mechanical attributes to be an excellent rosewood substitute, and some of the pictures in the thread show that it can be dark enough to satisfy those who are visually conservative (i.e., want the rosewood substitute to look like rosewood).
    It seems there are various woods in the frame with the bigger guitar companies to be "the rosewood replacement" - pau ferro and bocote immediately coming to mind - and perhaps jarrah should also be considered?
     
    mux164 likes this.

  11. Davecam48

    Davecam48 Friend of Leo's Gold Supporter

    Age:
    69
    Dec 31, 2009
    Queensland Australia
    Don't know if it is true or not, but I heard that when WA rail changed their track sleepers from jarrah to concrete that a cabinet maker in Melbourne bought a huge swag of it and makes beautiful custom made furniture from it. It would have been a lifetime supply ...or two if you lived that long.

    A bit like a bloke I met who wanted to buy an aluminium flagpole at the fittings auction after Expo-88 in Brisbane. He thought he bought one pole which was all he wanted, and discovered when he went to pick it up that he'd bought 50 or 60.............some ridiculous number anyway.

    DC
     
    Mat likes this.

  12. Jackadder

    Jackadder Tele-Meister

    383
    Jun 12, 2014
    West Australia
    Thanks for all the replies, and apologies for not replying sooner.

    Yes, I will make a jarrah neck. And I will report back upon completion.

    And I'll comment on replies, too, shortly.....
     
    Mase likes this.

  13. jmoore65

    jmoore65 Tele-Meister

    Age:
    58
    251
    Sep 27, 2007
    Oz
    Just wondering if anyone has made a fingerboard out of redgum? (sorry not relevant to the thread).
     

  14. mux164

    mux164 Tele-Meister

    302
    Jul 28, 2013
    australia
    I think I did, bunnings I'm pretty sure they were calling it river red at my local shop.

    If it's the same it kinda looks like karri, I have it on A Doug fir v that I made
     

  15. Davecam48

    Davecam48 Friend of Leo's Gold Supporter

    Age:
    69
    Dec 31, 2009
    Queensland Australia

    I've made a few from an old electricity pole cross member from the pole in front of my place when Ergon installed a transformer to supply a new car wash on the corner close to my house. It by far and away makes the best fret-boards but the piece I have is more than 100 years old so is very stable and hard. It will polish up like glass and holds the frets well. Cannot fault it, but new timber may be different. Have a look here http://www.tdpri.com/threads/some-fret-boards.729996/

    DC
     

  16. Crafty Fox

    Crafty Fox Tele-Holic

    984
    Nov 25, 2011
    Perth Australia
    I often use jarrah for fretboards. I find it is easily as hard as rosewood, maybe harder, and have oiled it or lacquered, depending on the instrument.
    I often work with it and just rebuilt a front verandah and put down jarrah t & g boards for a customer, finished yesterday.
    I'm a carpenter, working mostly on renos in Perth. If I spot anything nicer than average I'll stash it for a future guitar build.
    It was used for railway sleepers, and also most structural components in housing and even larger commercial buildings. Excellent for furniture construction too.
    I was working in Dwellingup (south west timber town) earlier this year and saw that the mill I bought my timber from still cuts railway sleepers.
    I haven't tried building a jarrah acoustic yet but it will happen. I hear its a bugger to bend though.
    I know others have built jarrah acoustics over here but I haven't seen or heard one yet.

    Here are two jarrah examples: The archtop has oiled jarrah 'board, while the red thinline has lacquered 'board.

    IMG_4184.jpg IMG_0483.jpg
     
    Jackadder, drlucky and Artslap like this.

  17. Crafty Fox

    Crafty Fox Tele-Holic

    984
    Nov 25, 2011
    Perth Australia

    Hey Dazza, I see you are in Denmark now.......was sunny Scotland too warm for you? :lol:
     
    dazzaman likes this.

  18. jmoore65

    jmoore65 Tele-Meister

    Age:
    58
    251
    Sep 27, 2007
    Oz
    Thanks - and I see from that thread that we have already discussed redgum!

    It's a beautiful wood. Like I said on the other thread, I have an old, seasoned stable piece that I've used already for a body. It's hard and wears tools badly but the end result is just gorgeous. I can see how it would work as a fretboard wood.

    JM
     

  19. Mase

    Mase TDPRI Member

    82
    Apr 20, 2016
    Australia
    Hi Crafty, good post. Can I ask you what sort of oil you used to finish the archtop fretboard with ?
     

  20. Crafty Fox

    Crafty Fox Tele-Holic

    984
    Nov 25, 2011
    Perth Australia
    I use either lemon oil or orange oil; both products by Gilly Stephenson, made right here in the Mild West.
    I probably give it 5 or 6 coats at the beginning and just rub on a bit more when I change strings.
    I'm not saying it's the best product, it just happens to easily available.....from Bunnings.
    I'm happy to be guided to other superior products if anyone has anything to add?
     
    Mase likes this.

IMPORTANT: Treat everyone here with respect, no matter how difficult!
No sex, drug, political, religion or hate discussion permitted here.