Any Jazz Pros have a favorite instructional system?

Discussion in 'Tab, Tips, Theory and Technique' started by Mark the Moose, May 10, 2019.

  1. ASATKat

    ASATKat Tele-Afflicted

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    Hands down, for me, the best book for a solid foundation on playing chords and melody together is the long out of print Bucky Pizzarelli book The Creative Guitarist. If you've heard my playing over in Twanger Central then you've heard these melodic chords because they have simply become my foundation. =)

    I wish I could share this great book with everyone =(
     
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  2. Mojo Brown

    Mojo Brown TDPRI Member

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    Jazz arpeggios for guitar : A New Dimension In Guitar Technique

    This one was is written by my uncle, Joe Cinderella, back in the 80s. Might be hard to find but the knowledge within is astounding.

    In fact, he has quite a few out there and if you can find any of them, it's priceless knowledge.

    Les Paul could have chose anyone to teach his sons to play. He chose Joe, for a reason.
     
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  3. klasaine

    klasaine Poster Extraordinaire

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    The OP is not a beginner. He has played jazz piano professionally and taught professionally for the past 20 years. He has also played guitar for 30 years though limited as he says to worship and bar bands. Knowing this is why I picked the books I did.

    As I mentioned in regard to the Ted Greene books, "the gold is in the chapters that pre and proceed the chord dictionary". Everybody - even Ted - picks the voicings they like.

    The Martino book is not advanced conceptually for anyone who's played jazz for 20 years. In fact, it's simplified and fairly normal - especially the 'dorian conversion' thing. Too technically or physically play like Pat, yes it's a task - he's got great chops but his conceptual approach is neither difficult nor unique. I picked it because it demonstrates a guitar centric way to employ minor conversion and dim/aug concepts in a linear fashion that's economical on the guitar.

    YMMV.
     
    Last edited: May 14, 2019
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  4. marcflores

    marcflores Tele-Meister

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    Not to hijack this thread, but can anyone recommend resources or a path for a beginner to jazz (i.e. no jazz knowledge or experience, but decades playing blues, rock and classical guitar)?

    Alternatively, can anyone recommend a good teacher in the Bay Area? I don't know how much I trust Yelp and I was thinking of signing up for the adult jazz guitar classes at the California Jazz Conservatory in Berkeley.
     
  5. klasaine

    klasaine Poster Extraordinaire

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    Local colleges and universities are one of the best resources to get your feet wet. You'll be exposed to players that are better than you and some that are less advanced. If you've played blues and rock for a long time, it's not a huge tweak to start getting some jazz in there. The most important thing to do is listen to a lot of jazz. As for beginning books, reference all the other posts in this thread especially the first half dozen or so.
     
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  6. Ian T

    Ian T Tele-Holic

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    OP, with your experience, you should have a solid command of jazz theory, ear training and vocabulary. Thus all you need to do is learn the fretboard and develop the technique to apply it.

    For this, Ted Greene's Modern Chord Progressions has everything you need to know for learning voicings and how to apply them to, ii-V-I's, turnarounds. If you really dig into this book, it has everything you need to be able to create beautiful chord melody arrangements.

    If you want to play bebop, you will need to develop your right and left hand technique to handle the tempos as well as master the fretboard to be able to flow effortlessly over changes. I would recommend learning 20 bebop heads, by ear. then start mixing them up, a la David Baker. Practice them until you can make them swing. Surely you already know hundreds of standards as a jazz pianist, so now you just need to find the notes on the fretboard. If you just rely upon your sense of swing and taste, you'll fall into playing with suitable technique (which can be totally unorthodox, e.g. Wes Montgomery).

    Learning jazz guitar within a few months, even with your base, is dreamy. You either have tremendous talent, or a greatly inflated perception of your own ability, or a lack of respect for guitar players in general. Good luck!
     
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  7. Alter

    Alter TDPRI Member

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    Warren Nunes has lot of books with chord shapes for various standards, great way to start playing more complicated harmony on the guitar. Pat Martino and Mickie Baker books are great line material.

    But the most effective way I can think of is a teacher to get you started on the jazz guitar approach and after a few lessons you have it covered and can probably continue on your own.
     
  8. ndcaster

    ndcaster Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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    joe pass will get you pretty far and fast

    very concise
     
  9. joealso

    joealso Tele-Holic Silver Supporter

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    Do a YouTube search for "Mickey Baker Lesson"
     
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  10. mgreene

    mgreene Tele-Holic

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    As you are a pianist, I suggest Johnny Smith's book. It is written in treble and bass clef; apparently he believed that his students should learn both clefs as general practice. He was in intellectual guy - you will probably like his approach. Mel Bay presents Vol 1 and 2.
     
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  11. twotone60

    twotone60 Tele-Meister

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    Frank Vignola’s TrueFire lessons have worked best for me. All levels and styles. Very clear, immediately useable.
     
  12. ASATKat

    ASATKat Tele-Afflicted

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    That depends on your interests and learning styles. Music stores where local teachers teach can be a place to interview. Any local Junior Collage with a beginning improv class could be invaluable and addicting. Ask the working pros where to find this mystery teacher.
     
    Last edited: May 21, 2019
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  13. Mark the Moose

    Mark the Moose Tele-Meister

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    I played a few gigs in the bay area with Tom Patitucci, he's an incredible player, teacher and all around good dude. He teaches out in the East Bay area. If he's not close enough to you I'm sure he knows someone who is. https://tompatitucci.com

    And yes, he's the brother of the well known jazz bassist.
     
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  14. Shango66

    Shango66 Friend of Leo's

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    Another vote for the berklee books 1 2 3.
     
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