Any advice on how to get past the standard chords?

Discussion in 'Tab, Tips, Theory and Technique' started by Marquee Moon, May 23, 2019.

  1. Marquee Moon

    Marquee Moon Tele-Meister

    Posts:
    140
    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2018
    Location:
    New Jersey
    Does anyone have any cool tricks or videos?
     
  2. klasaine

    klasaine Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    8,506
    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2006
    Location:
    NELA, Ca
    Start to play some jazz.
    I'm serious.
    Begin with "Autumn Leaves".

    autumn_leaves_voicings.jpeg
     
    GibbyTwin, maxvintage, DonM and 9 others like this.
  3. Sparky2

    Sparky2 Friend of Leo's

    Age:
    59
    Posts:
    2,010
    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2017
    Location:
    Harvest, Alabama
    It's easy.

    Listen to a few of your favorite guitar songs.

    Pull up the chord charts for them all.

    And there you will find your most challenging task;
    Making your guitar sound like your favorite songs, using those foreign chords with all the diminished 7th fingerings.

    *boom*

    :)
     
  4. ndcaster

    ndcaster Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

    Posts:
    7,178
    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2013
    Location:
    Indiana
    easy, find middle C on guitar in all its locations

    then figure out how to
    play a C chord around that in each location

    then, around each location, find how to play a G chord

    use your ears
     
    Milspec likes this.
  5. Milspec

    Milspec Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    3,224
    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2016
    Location:
    Nebraska
    Spot on advice right there. That was how I was taught, it worked and I am an idiot.
     
  6. burtf51

    burtf51 Tele-Meister

    Posts:
    195
    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2008
    Location:
    Carrollton, Ms
    If you're at all interested in online lessons take a look at Frank Vignola at truefire. Frank is not only an extremely knowledgeable musician he is one of the best music teachers you'll find.
     
    Smokin OP, VWAmTele and MuddyDitch like this.
  7. ASATKat

    ASATKat Tele-Afflicted

    Age:
    65
    Posts:
    1,142
    Joined:
    Nov 16, 2018
    Location:
    next to the burn zone
    I have a ton of tricks, but what kind of music are you interested in? What are basic chords, cowboy or folk chords or 7th chords?

    The more info you give us the closer you'll get to your goal.
     
  8. ASATKat

    ASATKat Tele-Afflicted

    Age:
    65
    Posts:
    1,142
    Joined:
    Nov 16, 2018
    Location:
    next to the burn zone
    Or maybe work on A Million Years Ago by Adele. After all it uses the Autumn Leaves progression lol.

    Autumn Leaves is a great choice to practice and understand some of the most foundational aspects of popular music, but it doesn't always play well with rock & roll and vise versa. So to help the op I need to know what kind of music are they talking about?
     
    Last edited: May 23, 2019
  9. Doctorx33

    Doctorx33 Tele-Afflicted

    Age:
    64
    Posts:
    1,456
    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2014
    Location:
    Atlanta
    Two words:

    Ted Greene
     
  10. Marquee Moon

    Marquee Moon Tele-Meister

    Posts:
    140
    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2018
    Location:
    New Jersey
    I like jangly stuff like James Honeyman Scott,Johnny Marr, etc im a big fan of burt bacharach songs.
     
  11. SixStringSlinger

    SixStringSlinger Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

    Posts:
    2,503
    Joined:
    May 21, 2006
    Location:
    Space
    Lots of good advice already. I'd add this: Just screw around on your guitar, putting your fingers on random strings and frets, maybe mix in some open notes (this can sound especially cool when the fretted notes are high up the neck). Whatever you come up with, play it in different ways; strumming, arpeggios, fingerpicking etc. When you hear something you like, work out what the notes are and their relationships to each other, and what the kind of chord is called (there are websites and apps where you can plug in notes and it will give you options for what that chord may be called, depending on context). Then use the same site/app or a chord book (or your own fretboard knowledge, such as it is) to find/work out different ways to play that kind of chord.

    A simpler trick is to take chords you already know and move different notes up or down a fret or two, and see what comes of that. Or take a standard open-chord shape, and play that higher up the neck but keeping the open notes.

    I would also recommend learning songs you like the chord changes in, because it's often not about an individual chord, but the context (the key the song is in, what chord comes immediately before or after, etc.). Beatles songs are a great example of this. "Here, There and Everywhere" is a gorgeous song, but chord-wise it's just simple open and barre chords, none higher than the fourth fret or so. But the progression is beautiful.
     
    Bluego1 likes this.
  12. getbent

    getbent Telefied Ad Free Member

    Posts:
    35,635
    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2006
    Location:
    San Benito County, California
    rub your body with fatback.
     
  13. sardinista

    sardinista TDPRI Member

    Posts:
    66
    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2019
    Location:
    Bay Area, CA
    I started taking proper lessons with a legit jazz guitarist last year, and since then... well, the crazy chords are coming fast and furious, and I’m becoming more comfortable with them every day. So, basically: try private lessons!
     
    Nick Fanis and Harry Styron like this.
  14. sardinista

    sardinista TDPRI Member

    Posts:
    66
    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2019
    Location:
    Bay Area, CA
    REMOVED: stupidly quoted my own post vs. editing. :-\
     
  15. klasaine

    klasaine Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    8,506
    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2006
    Location:
    NELA, Ca
    I stand by my original post. Horse, water, drink ...

     
    Harry Styron, GibbyTwin and getbent like this.
  16. Piggy Stu

    Piggy Stu Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    3,852
    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2017
    Location:
    UK
    Was this meant to be a DM to someone held in your basement?
     
    thechad and getbent like this.
  17. chris m.

    chris m. Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    6,277
    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2003
    Location:
    Santa Barbara, California
    Can you play a classic bar chord such as F at first fret, or C at third fret? This is often a challenge for beginners but is the gateway to being
    able to play any chord.

    A great trick to getting good at grabbing chords is the concept of proprioception. I learned this from a viola teacher, actually....

    pro·pri·o·cep·tion
    /ˈˌprōprēəˈsepSH(ə)n/
    noun
    PHYSIOLOGY
    1. perception or awareness of the position and movement of the body.
    So here's how it works when it comes to playing guitar. Finger a new chord, let's say an F bar chord, or maybe a D 7+9. Whatever-- as long
    as it's a new chord for you. When you first finger it you probably have to look at the strings and clumsily put your fingers in place. Finger it a handful
    of times while looking. Make sure you can get all the notes to ring out. Take your hand away each time before you go to finger it again.

    Here's the proprioception part. As you're doing this, take a pause once you have the chord fingered properly. Close your eyes and concentrate on how
    the chord feels.

    After you've been fingering it awhile, move your hand away from chord position. Close your eyes, think of what it feels like to be in the chord position,
    and try to return your fingers back to that feeling. That is proprioception-- awareness of what it feels like to being in the right position, and going back to that feeling without having to look.
    It is really uncanny how well this technique works. I use it all the time when I'm trying to learn a difficult new fingering.

    For fretless instruments like viola or violin, this is the key to being able to grab notes with correct intonation without the crutch of frets.

    If you ever watch Olympic divers "visualizing" a dive before they actually go to perform it, they are trying to feel the dive in their minds before they execute it.
    They are not picturing the dive, they are feeling it. This technique works for any physical sport-- golf swing, slap shot, Olympic dive, bar chord. Feel the feeling in your mind first, then take your
    body to that feeling.

    Once you learn how to do this then another cool thing is you can actually practice guitar in your mind when you don't have a guitar in your hand. You run through the changes
    or the solo line in your mind, making sure you are actually feeling all the changes as you do them. Sometimes it helps to actually move your hands as if playing air guitar while
    you're doing it. I know that I have a passage down solid when I can totally feel it in my mind as I rehearse it in my mind. If there is an area when I'm likely to stumble in actual playing, sure enough when
    I try to feel that passage in my mind I stumble on it there as well.

    For experienced players who have never tried this, give it a go. You may be shocked at how much faster you can learn a new, difficult fingering using this technique.
     
  18. rze99

    rze99 Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    6,465
    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2014
    Location:
    South London UK
    Explore alternative tunings.
     
    ndcaster likes this.
  19. getbent

    getbent Telefied Ad Free Member

    Posts:
    35,635
    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2006
    Location:
    San Benito County, California
    I am interested in this, but might it produce priapism?
     
    Jim622 and Piggy Stu like this.
  20. Marc Morfei

    Marc Morfei Tele-Holic

    Age:
    54
    Posts:
    780
    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2018
    Location:
    Philadelphia, PA
    You mean you need more than three?
     
    DonM and tfarny like this.
IMPORTANT: Treat everyone here with respect, no matter how difficult!
No sex, drug, political, religion or hate discussion permitted here.


  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.