Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com
Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com
Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com

Another Walnut Build Thread

Discussion in 'Tele Home Depot' started by dhempy, Jan 28, 2017.

  1. dhempy

    dhempy TDPRI Member

    Age:
    61
    62
    Jan 23, 2017
    Santa Rosa Valley, CA
    Here are a couple of random progress shots ... drilling out the string holes, and starting on the ferrule insets (I used the 1/8" pin in the string hole trick for alignment and it came out great!). I drilled the 3/8" inset for the ferrule to sit flush and then finished up with a 5/8" bit. I'll post a post-drilling ferrule pic next go round. The last shot is of the body right after I drilled the jack hole. A handscrew clamp, some 2x4 and a couple of metal shims had everything lined up and vertical. If you look close in the first pic you can see I've drilled the pickup connection holes. Next up will be the 1/8" round over and putting on the pore filler before I do the inlay in the burl voids. I still need to figure out what to do for the sapwood. Hopefully, I can find a piece of scrap and do some testing.

    Dan
    20170423_152811.jpg 20170423_154710.jpg 20170424_135900.jpg
     
    Last edited: Apr 25, 2017

  2. R. Stratenstein

    R. Stratenstein Doctor of Teleocity

    Aug 3, 2010
    Loganville, Ga.
    I don't mind the sapwood so very much, it's interesting, and very "real". Thinking it might be difficult to match the color with stain, maybe a translucent burst effect would help tie the sapwood and heartwood together better?
     
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  3. dhempy

    dhempy TDPRI Member

    Age:
    61
    62
    Jan 23, 2017
    Santa Rosa Valley, CA
    Oh ... I actually planned to have the sapwood that way ... kind of like a burst ... what I was meaning was how to "fix" the sapwood where it appears the grain separated when it was run through the planer. This area ... I don't think dark pore filler is the answer ... someone suggested just filling with epoxy. I don't know. I'll try to get a few pics when it is wet with denatured alcohol to simulate the lacquer ... stunning.
    [​IMG]
     

  4. imploration

    imploration Tele-Meister Ad Free Member

    134
    Sep 19, 2010
    Midwest
    That's a beautiful slab!!!
     

  5. imploration

    imploration Tele-Meister Ad Free Member

    134
    Sep 19, 2010
    Midwest
    Why not epoxy or hot stuff in those cracks?
     

  6. Marn99

    Marn99 Tele-Meister

    Age:
    18
    410
    Nov 25, 2016
    Brookfield, WI
    Are you still considering turquoise or another stone, dhempy?
     

  7. dhempy

    dhempy TDPRI Member

    Age:
    61
    62
    Jan 23, 2017
    Santa Rosa Valley, CA
    Adam: Thanks! As for the sapwood cracks, I'm concerned that any kind of glue will alter how the wood takes lacquer i.e. you'll see mottling where it wasn't absorbed equally. Certainly any kind of CA with the way it wicks will be a problem (I know from using it on other endeavors).

    Marn99: Yes for the larger cracks I've got Chrysocolla and Pyrite on the way. The sapwood cracks are too small IMO for that treatment. Shot of Chrysocolla from their website below.
    [​IMG]
     
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  8. DrASATele

    DrASATele Poster Extraordinaire

    Jul 6, 2012
    North of Boston
    Dan... I've done just Epoxy in those types of cracks and scars, it doesn't wick into the surrounding wood so no shadows appear. I've put both shellac and Lacquer on areas I have done this to with no effect on the finish.

    It looks amazing and you're not even done yet!
     

  9. Marn99

    Marn99 Tele-Meister

    Age:
    18
    410
    Nov 25, 2016
    Brookfield, WI
    oohh! good choice on the Chrysocolla, looking back on it I think the darker blue will look cooler than the lighter blue of the turquoise.
     

  10. dhempy

    dhempy TDPRI Member

    Age:
    61
    62
    Jan 23, 2017
    Santa Rosa Valley, CA
    Marn: I do too. I came real close to getting Lapis Lazuli. I bought both a powder and small sand size. I'm going to attempt to make the larger inlays appear as though they were mineralized in place including the pyrite (2 degrees in geology .. can't help myself!)

    DrASATele: Thanks. I found a piece of scrap yesterday ... it doesn't have the same size imperfections in its sapwood as does the body. On one side I treated everything with an ebony colored pore filler. It suggests a 24 hour drying time so I won't know how it looks until afternoon. I'll post a pic or three later. I don't think it would look too good in those larger "cracks" but we'll see. My plan was to get the pore filler in on all of the darker wood (less the cracks to be inlayed) and leave it unsanded until after the inlay is in place and dried. This would help any "oops" with the epoxy and the sanding/flattening of the inlay ... nevermind giving it plenty of dry time. I'm using Cardinal products from LMI .. fillet and lacquer. So let's say I go with the epoxy, would you then use it on all of the sapwood? Does it bring out the grain texture the way lacquer does? I'll try to get a "wet" (denatured alcohol) shot of the end of the body where there are birdseyes in the sapwood. I'd really like to be sure these come through. I bought a nice clear 15 minute epoxy (Zpoxy) for doing the inlays ... would you use this (perhaps thinned a bit) or would you go get the specific epoxy that folks use for pore filling?

    Pics below: 1) Back after ferrule drilling ... nice and straight .. thanks to TDPRI members that pointed me to the 1/8" pin technique. 2) Scrap after sanding the end up to 220. 3) a "wet" shot of the same piece (denatured alcohol). 4) Ebony pore filler drying.

    20170425_142701.jpg 20170425_132229.jpg 20170425_132331.jpg 20170425_133620.jpg

    Dan
     
    Last edited: Apr 26, 2017

  11. dhempy

    dhempy TDPRI Member

    Age:
    61
    62
    Jan 23, 2017
    Santa Rosa Valley, CA
    Change of plans:

    After looking at the results of my Cardinal Pore filler experiment and consulting with a local luthier, I'm now thinking I'm going to use an epoxy pore filler like Z-poxy. That should take care of sapwood areas too ... I'll get a bit of the silica thickener to address the larger gaps. I'm now thinking I'll do the Z-poxy first, then the inlay.
     
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  12. DrASATele

    DrASATele Poster Extraordinaire

    Jul 6, 2012
    North of Boston
    I like the epoxy even in the bigger voids. It does give it that wet look, until you sand, then when you put your finish on it, the wet look comes back and is unnoticeable. I did epoxy under Shellac and Tru-Oil on a reclaimed chestnut build. The only mistake I made was not letting warming the first batch, the first time I did it. I ended up with a fog and bubbles visible deep inside a 1/2 inch void. It's interesting because the following applications I use a hair dryer set on medium and warmed the area and the epoxy and that issue never happened again, the epoxy seeped in and was crystal clear, which was how and why I found my initial mistake.

    DNA can be used to thin it, just beware this can make it act a little like CA in that it tends to wick in further when thinned. That is why I used the hair dryer tick, which I learned from a Ron Kirn thread or comment.
     
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  13. dhempy

    dhempy TDPRI Member

    Age:
    61
    62
    Jan 23, 2017
    Santa Rosa Valley, CA
    Thanks DrASATele. I did a test run with a bit of the Z-Poxy 30 minute clear that I'm going to use for the inlay and I like the results. I didn't have any of the colloidal silica thickening powder as that arrived about an hour ago. I'm waiting for the Z-Poxy finishing resin to show before continuing. I plan on doing a bit more testing on everything before I get after the body but I think I'm going to really like the results. I considered just epoxying the voids but not that I have the Chrysocolla in hand I'm pretty happy with that choice. I hope to do a practice run with that tomorrow.

    After drilling out the jack hole I came up with a better idea for getting the cup to sit right ... wish I had thought of it _BEFORE_ drilling. The idea is to use a Forstner bit the same size as the outer dimension of the cup and inset it just enough so there isn't any visible crack. I can avoid "the flat spot" with this technique. Now ideally I would've drilled the inset first. The plan now is to put something in the hole to allow the bit to have something to grab onto. And <embarrassed> I need to route the 1/8" roundover .. the jack hole is right where the bits bearing would hit so it "would leave a mark". As a friend of mine used to say ... if you drink ... don't drill (not that I was drinking that day ... I had the forstner bits out and it just seemed like it was time to drill it d'oh!).

    Dan
     

  14. dhempy

    dhempy TDPRI Member

    Age:
    61
    62
    Jan 23, 2017
    Santa Rosa Valley, CA
    Looks like I double posted. Deleting ..
     

  15. dhempy

    dhempy TDPRI Member

    Age:
    61
    62
    Jan 23, 2017
    Santa Rosa Valley, CA
    Here are some catch-up pics ... First is prepping the test imperfection before inlay. I put tape around everything as a precaution/working surface. Second is the inlay material all in place with epoxy. Last pic is the inlay sanded flat with 220. The process was relatively easy and came out great! I put in a bit more Pyrite than I probably will in the final version ... the Pyrite pieces were inserted individually ... not mixed in with everything else. The look is just what I was looking for ... mineralized in place.


    20170428_170322.jpg 20170428_170854.jpg 20170429_103845.jpg
     
    Last edited: May 1, 2017

  16. Marn99

    Marn99 Tele-Meister

    Age:
    18
    410
    Nov 25, 2016
    Brookfield, WI
    looking absolutely beautiful!
     
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  17. MM73

    MM73 Tele-Afflicted

    Age:
    44
    Feb 24, 2015
    South Lyon, MI
    Stunning. Very interested to see how this turns out - love the mineralized pyrite concept!
     
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  18. DrASATele

    DrASATele Poster Extraordinaire

    Jul 6, 2012
    North of Boston
    I found that if you take a plastic baggy, the good kind, like Glad that's a bit stronger than say a cheap sandwich bag, and use that like a pastry bag it work great as an applicator.
    I love the test results.
    side note on the plastic baggy trick, if you want to suspend glitter, dust, shells, or any fine partical you can mix them into the bag and cut a slightly wider tip and it make a inlay and filling a breeze.
     
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  19. dhempy

    dhempy TDPRI Member

    Age:
    61
    62
    Jan 23, 2017
    Santa Rosa Valley, CA
    DrASATele: That is a Great Idea! I'll test that out. Thanks!

    Dan
     

  20. DrASATele

    DrASATele Poster Extraordinaire

    Jul 6, 2012
    North of Boston
    No problem, doing the scrap piece of wood or dowel to try an position the epoxy in the right spot always drove me nuts. The thicker the plastic that makes up the bag the better the results and less mess. Basically you should be able to mix the 2 parts in the plastic bag without breaking the bag, then you cut the tip like a pastry bag.

    I love the look of the positioned inlay rather than it being suspended in the Epoxy it gives it that underwater look. Using the hair dryer trick should get all the bubbles out so the inlay looks like it's under glass or perfectly still water.

    Grab a hole cutter and make a plug so you can plug that hole before you route... it happens to most of us ;)
    Now I do it in steps, after the round over... drill a pilot hole with a 3/8ths bit dead center, come back to it with the largest outside diameter for the recess, then the slightly smaller diameter for the depth of the cup, then one last smaller diameter for wires and the rear prongs of the jack.
     
    Last edited: May 2, 2017

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