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Another odd hollow body experiment

Discussion in 'Tele Home Depot' started by maxvintage, Jul 21, 2018.

  1. ndcaster

    ndcaster Poster Extraordinaire

    Nov 14, 2013
    Indiana
    or an unpotted microphonic pickup?
     

  2. bottlenecker

    bottlenecker Friend of Leo's

    Dec 6, 2015
    Wisconsin
    I think we're all assuming its going to be set up with playable action. So if the neck angle changes, then yeah, you have to turn those little thumb wheels to raise the bridge, or the strings will fret out.
     

  3. Zepfan

    Zepfan Poster Extraordinaire

    Nov 30, 2013
    Horn Lake, MS
    My avatar guitar is a hollow body guitar made in Japan and came with highly microphonic single coil pickups, squealed like a banshee. I wouldn't recommend it.

    A rod piezo with a preamp works great.
     

  4. ndcaster

    ndcaster Poster Extraordinaire

    Nov 14, 2013
    Indiana
    a rod piezo under the bridge, you mean?
     

  5. Zepfan

    Zepfan Poster Extraordinaire

    Nov 30, 2013
    Horn Lake, MS

  6. Barncaster

    Barncaster Doctor of Teleocity

    Yes, pickup selection will be interesting on this one. I really loved the neck tone Ted Greene got out of his Tele for Jazz. Although the comment was made, I believe by Eric Schoenberg that it had to be a really good Tele. LOL. I recently made a warmed over but very articulate Tele neck pup with some unusual features that is my new personal favorite Fender neck pup. PM me if you want the recipe. They also make metal neck surrounds which would compliment this guitar very nicely. My $.02.
    Rob
     

  7. maxvintage

    maxvintage Friend of Leo's Ad Free Member

    Age:
    59
    Mar 16, 2003
    Arlington, VA
    Not much progress--waiting on a package from Stewmac

    The body has been stained a dark brown on the back and sides and an amber with a very faint reddish edge on the top. The neck has a base coat of garnet shellac

    neckandbody.jpg

    I'm going to start with the garnet shellac on the top, so the color will deepen and blend a bit.



    While waiting I figured why not try and make a tort pickguard with epoxy. I found a model, based on a ES-150, and made first a plywood template and then a clear acrylic template. I lightly coated the top of the acrylic with olive oil and made a crude mold out of gaffer tape around the edge. You can see it's shiny from the olive oil--that's so the epoxy won't stick to the acrylic, I hope


    form1.jpg




    I got some pourable epoxy from Home depot and some acrylic inks from the craft shop. Dyed the activator an orangish color, mixed it with the resin, and then poured it in. Then I used the eyedropper in the ink bottles to drop spots of brown, black, and then brown and black mixed. Swirled it up with a toothpick.

    form2.jpg



    It looks good--it dosen't look like tortoise shell, but it looks good. I'm planning to put a white binding on it.

    But it might not work. The cup in the top of the image, next to the tape measure, has the base color. I think I may have added too much of the acrylic ink. The stuff in the cup got fiercely hot and was rock hard in three hours. The stuff in the mold is slightly warm and still soft, although it's setting. I may have messed up by adding too much ink.

    It's pretty translucent, which I'm happy about. But I have a feeling it's not going to set properly.

    form3.jpg

    It's pretty thick and will need a good bit of sanding down. Never tried this before!


    I have a Lollar Charlie Christian on the way, but I'm leaning towards a dog ear P90. I have a p90 sitting here, and stew mac is mailing me a dog ear cover and base plate. We'll see
     
    Last edited: Jul 25, 2018

  8. ndcaster

    ndcaster Poster Extraordinaire

    Nov 14, 2013
    Indiana
    kewl

    didn't someone post a thread here about knobs for Brainy or something that also addressed pickguard fabrication?
     

  9. maxvintage

    maxvintage Friend of Leo's Ad Free Member

    Age:
    59
    Mar 16, 2003
    Arlington, VA

    Yes that's where I got the idea--that thread and the German jazzbox restoration thread.
     

  10. maxvintage

    maxvintage Friend of Leo's Ad Free Member

    Age:
    59
    Mar 16, 2003
    Arlington, VA
    As feared, the epoxy tortoise pickguard didn't cure hard enough. It looks good, but it's flexible as rubber--it will practically bend double on itself. The pickguard will be screwed to the top--it won't be a "floating" archtop style guard. But it feels too rubbery.

    I'm going to keep trying but also make a pickguard out of something else: i have some richlite on hand that would probably look good.

    Cut channels for binding and purfling and installed both on the back. I've never done purfling before. Bit of a PITA, but it looks pretty sharp even with all the tape on it
     

  11. ModerneGuy

    ModerneGuy Tele-Holic

    594
    Mar 9, 2011
    Sydney, Australia
    Nice project. Now I have no idea how it would react, but what if you didn't put any olive oil etc on the clear acrylic and used it as a base for your epoxy swirls on top of it. If you intend binding it, your not going to see the edges anyway. Just a thought ... but maybe it would still be too rubbery? All the best with it.
     

  12. maxvintage

    maxvintage Friend of Leo's Ad Free Member

    Age:
    59
    Mar 16, 2003
    Arlington, VA

    No that’s a good point, thank you, but it would really be too soft—it’d catch the pick and show fingernail marks. Like divots. So even if mounted to a substrate it’d still be too soft. I think the ink was too much fluid, maybe. I don’t know much about epoxy besides “mix it up and stick stuff together.”

    I went and bought some silicon mold making materials and made a mold and carefully mixed analine dye with epoxy—three colors, all from the same batch with minimal extra fluid. It seems to be working: it’s already much harder than the other one.
     

  13. maxvintage

    maxvintage Friend of Leo's Ad Free Member

    Age:
    59
    Mar 16, 2003
    Arlington, VA
    Success!

    Got a functional tort pickguard out of epoxy


    pg2.jpg

    This will need some sanding and then polishing, and then a binding. Not 100 percent sure what adhesive to use for a binding on epoxy. Superglue? Acetone? Acetone might dissolve the epoxy. Hmmm.....


    This is still too flexible to work well as a floating pickguard--you'd probably want to mount it on some kind of substrate. But it will work for a pickguard screwed to a flat surface
     
    LPTyler, Ekko and ModerneGuy like this.

  14. Old Tele Hack

    Old Tele Hack Tele-Meister Silver Supporter

    Age:
    51
    271
    Mar 31, 2017
    Virginia
    Epoxy?
     

  15. maxvintage

    maxvintage Friend of Leo's Ad Free Member

    Age:
    59
    Mar 16, 2003
    Arlington, VA

    Yes see above--the pickguard was made by coloring epoxy and pouring it into a mold
     

  16. Old Tele Hack

    Old Tele Hack Tele-Meister Silver Supporter

    Age:
    51
    271
    Mar 31, 2017
    Virginia
    Sorry for the confusion - If I understood you correctly, you wanted to glue binding to the pickguard, and I had bolded your question w/r/t which adhesive to use - and it's THAT that I was responding to. I've not found anything that sticks to epoxy bettern than epoxy.
     

  17. maxvintage

    maxvintage Friend of Leo's Ad Free Member

    Age:
    59
    Mar 16, 2003
    Arlington, VA
    Oh Ok got it

    Hard to do i think. Epoxy is messy and it's hard to hold in place while you're gluing
     

  18. mistermikev

    mistermikev Tele-Meister

    Age:
    44
    163
    Feb 20, 2018
    phoenix
    wow, that is cool. nice work.
     

  19. ndeli55

    ndeli55 Tele-Afflicted

    Age:
    34
    May 12, 2008
    oklahoma
    That is too cool. If you go at it again, acrylic resin is supposed to be harder, and I'd mix a few batches, coloring them the way you'd like and drip those into the master pour. The ink can cause issues with curing from what I've read. You might hit that with a heat gun and see if that firms it up.

    I love the look. It's not tortoise, but it's right nice.
     

  20. philosofriend

    philosofriend Tele-Holic

    745
    Oct 28, 2015
    Kalamazoo
    Have you thought about making an arched laminate top the way Gibson and everyone does it; by glueing veneers together from the start in the arched shape? There's a great video of the old Hofner factory showing a guy putting the glue on veneers and clamping them between two molds.

    Here is the theory of why the arch is better than flat: With an arch, as the down pressure on the bridge tries to warp the instrument out of shape, the flattening top tries to expand, pushing the two endblocks away from each other. Since the tension of the strings fights this, the resulting structure is strong and durable. 4oo year old violins are still in fine shape.

    But with a flat top, as the bridge tries to cave in the top it bends a reverse arch into the wood. This pulls the end blocks towards each other which is what the strings are trying to do anyway. Two forces working together to collapse the guitar.

    How the difference between arched and flat might affect the tone is fun to think about but I have no opinions. But I have played some luscious archtops.

    There was an old hillbilly around here who had built four succesful acoustic bass viols with arched tops made out of four panels of flat plywood. He figured out how to cut them so (with no bending) the came up to a low point under the middle of the bridge. Since the four sides were also flat the body shape was a diamond. He put on good pickups and they sounded great. They were big and used a bass violin bridge and strings.
     

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