Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com
Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com
Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com

and more questions

Discussion in 'Tele Home Depot' started by PonyExpress, Oct 2, 2017.

  1. PonyExpress

    PonyExpress TDPRI Member

    Age:
    56
    79
    Sep 28, 2017
    Texas
    so I have also decided I'm not anal enough to build an exact replica of a 52 black guard. May do a black high gloss with white guard.

    so then would it make sense to use modern tuners and hardware instead of true to vintage specs stuff?
    5 screw vs. 8 screw pick guard? I assume the 5 screw wasn't keeping it down flat so they went to 8?

    best place to buy electronics and other hardware? GFS looks pretty good to me. They also have reasonable prices on their pups but I not diddly about such things, hence me asking lots of questions.

    Man I'm getting excited to make some sawdust
     

  2. brownale99

    brownale99 TDPRI Member

    44
    Feb 18, 2017
    Newcastle, UK
    Not sure about you but I had to try and keep the cost down on the hardware and electronics after spending so much on tools. I put a post up on a few UK facebook musicians buy and sell pages asking for tele parts and ended getting everything bar the pickguard which I picked up 5 from a similar ad on ebay and one had a USA neck pickup in. I managed to get another job lot off ebay which had a load of screws, pots and controls. All in all I ended up with enough for 2 teles, one which will have USA standard pickups and electrics in for next to nothing. You just have to be patient with ebay etc and not go for the first lot at silly prices.
     

  3. RodeoTex

    RodeoTex Poster Extraordinaire

    Sep 14, 2005
    Nueces Strip
    If this is your first time, please realize that gloss black is extremely hard to do. (well)
     
    Steve Holt and mux164 like this.

  4. NotAnotherHobby

    NotAnotherHobby Tele-Afflicted

    Oct 27, 2015
    Da' Magic Mittin'
    Yes.

    If you're not doing a replica, then all bets are off as to "vintage" looks and/or hardware.

    I've personally always liked the modern stuff better.
     

  5. Jupiter

    Jupiter Telefied Ad Free Member

    Jun 22, 2010
    Osaka, Japan
    If you're not anal enough to do an exact replica of a blackguard, then why worry about whether or not to use other vintage specs? I like the 3-barrel bridge and the kluson-style tuners (though I actually have used Gotoh-branded ones) on a tele, but when it comes to screw holes in the PG, I just put 'em in where it looks like it needs it. ;)

    FWIW, I bought some JM-style PUs from GFS and I was satisfied with 'em.
     

  6. PonyExpress

    PonyExpress TDPRI Member

    Age:
    56
    79
    Sep 28, 2017
    Texas

    Understand. I painted cars, well , and am not intimidated by the finishing process. Is there an issue i might not be aware of?
     

  7. Ronkirn

    Ronkirn Doctor of Teleocity Vendor Member

    Age:
    71
    May 1, 2003
    Jacksonville, FL
    My thoughts exactly.... and let me expand....

    the worst mistake "you" can make is to try to make the first your interpretation of a dream guitar.. this is a learning experience... you're gonna screw something up and have to repair it... the knowledge that there is a "fix", even though concealed by paint or whatever, will bug ya like a cloud of mosquitos on a summer eve... and will continue until ya make #2...

    So keep it simple.... and take advantage of the most valuable tool you own, . . patience...

    Oh yeah.. make your first few bodies out of 2 X 8 construction grade pine available from any lumber yard... that way when the inevitable happens you can chunk it in the fire place and watch 5 bux worth of lumber go up in smoke... much more enjoyable than watching a 75 buck blank of something exotic get converted into carbon 'n smoke...

    when ya get the hang of shaping the body THEN bring out the expensive wood...

    here's some "stuff" to confuse ya further....;)

    Ron Kirn

    http://www.tdpri.com/forum/tele-technical/201556-fret-leveling-yer-tele-101-a.html

    http://jpbturbo.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/Tele_template-illustrated-reader-spreads.pdf

    http://jpbturbo.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/Tele-reader-spreads.pdf

    http://jpbturbo.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/Setup-reader-spreads.pdf

    http://jpbturbo.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/Strat-reader-spreads.pdf

    http://jpbturbo.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/Strat_template-illustrated-reader-spreads.pdf
     
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  8. viking

    viking Friend of Leo's

    Age:
    51
    Jan 23, 2007
    Denmark
    You are getting some great tips here !
    Its no big deal to hone your skills on a cheaper body construction , if you are like most of us , no 1 probably wont be as good as no 3 , or 5 ☺
    If you are experienced reg the finishing , you are already a good way ahead compared to some of us !

    No need to buy cheap hardware or electronics , though
    You can always move stuff over to the next build
    Or , if the first one turn out great , but you would still like a nicer body or neck , just swap the parts over later
     

  9. TRexF16

    TRexF16 Friend of Leo's

    Apr 4, 2011
    Tucson
    Great tips, indeed, and Ron's generosity with his pamphlets for the new guys is legendary. Probably the only area I differ slightly with him on though is the advice to make initial attempts with construction lumber. If you can't stand the idea of maybe having to trash $15 dollars worth of wood if you goon it up versus $5, then by all means go for it. But my experience is if you get a piece of 8/4 poplar to start your first build you'll be better served, and the chances of gooning it up will be much reduced, as will the quality of the finish when all goes well. First, the poplar (or alder, though poplar is likely a few dollars less) will work beautifully and be less prone to splintering and tear-out than the pine lumber. It'll also be more dimensionally stable, and most importantly, very easy to finish to the perfectly flat state needed to form the base for your gloss black finish. Pine is tricky due the big difference in harness between the early and late wood growth rings which can lead to ripples in the final sanding or even months after you're finished as everything cures.

    Otherwise I agree with everything he has ever said or thought in his entire life...;)

    Cheers,
    Rex
     
    Mat UK likes this.

  10. Jupiter

    Jupiter Telefied Ad Free Member

    Jun 22, 2010
    Osaka, Japan
    I'm with Rex on this one: get something a little bit better than construction grade pine. My first home brew was from a plank of Japanese cypress that cost about $40 but was big enough to get two bodies out of it. I had troubles the first time all right (I have troubles EVERY time, so far), but I did get it knocked out, and I'm glad I used a decent piece of wood. I'm definitely not a wood snob: I've built two of em out of scraps of mahogany (mill ends, basically) that I got for free to burn in my wood stove!
     

  11. RickyRicardo

    RickyRicardo Friend of Leo's

    Mar 27, 2012
    Calgary, Alberta
    For my first scratch build Tele I went with these pickups and love 'em:
    https://www.ebay.com/p/Fender-Acces...elecaster-Pickups/2164318637?iid=332137622893

    Tele bridges:
    http://www.guitarpartsresource.com/gbridge_genuinefendertele.htm

    http://www.guitarfetish.com/Wilkinson-Compensated-Tele-Bridge-Brass-Saddles_p_873.html

    I've used the vintage Kluson style tuners from GFS and they work fine. There are also lots of mini Rotomatic clones out there that are good too. Or the real ones:
    http://www.guitarpartsresource.com/tuners_grover6.htm

    For wiring I like the quality of this:
    http://www.theartoftone.com/telecaster/

    For a pickguard you could make your own template and buy the blank material from GFS.
    http://www.guitarfetish.com/Uncut-Pickguard-Material-Great-for-Custom-Pickguards-_c_224.html

    Since you're painting it poplar will work just fine. However, spraying a car is different than wood. My only advice is a good flat and level sealer coat. I've done a couple of black guitars and just starting a black Tuxedo Tele which I'll spray in the spring and have learned that the sealer coat is the most important. Poplar (or alder) doesn't need grain filling but if the sealer coat isn't thick enough and level enough you could get grain coming through a bit. A lesson learned on my part.
     

    Attached Files:

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  12. PonyExpress

    PonyExpress TDPRI Member

    Age:
    56
    79
    Sep 28, 2017
    Texas
    Great stuff there guys. Thanks so much.

    already had found Rons e-books and such in another thread. Very kind of you to share with us all Ron.

    As for wood, I bought a alder board yesterday. Poplar was a bit less but wanted something more traditional so got the alder. It is going to be a 3 piece body and seems to be pretty fine grained. its between flat and quarter sawn.

    I'll ask many questions about the black finishing when I get closer to that stage.

    My dad is currently planing and jointing and gluing up the 2 body blanks for me. I am patiently(not really) waiting for the templates to arrive. Going to have neck PDF printed out full size today.

    Again thanks guys

    P.S. oh and after reading here and watching youtube videos about winding pickups, I fear that I will be making a winder and trying my hand at my own pups. (lord help me!)
     
    Steve Holt likes this.

  13. RickyRicardo

    RickyRicardo Friend of Leo's

    Mar 27, 2012
    Calgary, Alberta
    If you're interested in winding pickups there is a current thread going that has lots of info in there. Lots of help and expertise around as well. It's a lot of fun.
     

  14. PonyExpress

    PonyExpress TDPRI Member

    Age:
    56
    79
    Sep 28, 2017
    Texas
    I am since I like doing/building things myself BUT when you can get a set from GFS for $50 its hard to pass up
     

  15. 4 Cat Slim

    4 Cat Slim Friend of Leo's

    Oct 17, 2012
    Nelson City TX
    I wish I'd had the benefit of Ron Kirn's wisdom way back in 1988 when I attempted my first parts caster!

    I agree with all of his comments. Above all, it's a learning experience and it can also be a lot of fun.
     

  16. Ronkirn

    Ronkirn Doctor of Teleocity Vendor Member

    Age:
    71
    May 1, 2003
    Jacksonville, FL
    Don't get caught up in what other guys think about the "sound" from specific parts... each and every guitar will be different and what sounds one way in one can, and probably will, sound somewhat different in another (your's) ..

    Just stay with tried and true components.. do not Settle for a compromise.. save a few more bux and go for whatever your number one pick was... However. . just forget the 600.00 titanium parts, and 400.00 boutique pickups.. there is no, nor can there be, any guarantee such costly parts will sound any better, or different than the tried and true parts so many have had great success with.

    Do yourself a favor.. think of this as going for your Associates' Degree in building... wait to spend the big bux until after you have your Master's and are going for the Doctorate...

    Ron
     
    brownale99 likes this.

  17. Dismalhead

    Dismalhead Poster Extraordinaire

    Age:
    54
    Feb 16, 2014
    Auburn, California
    I've never considered doing a part-for-part replica. I'm getting parts based on quality, price, and what I would want my guitar to be like, both tone-wise and appearance-wise.. My last partscaster has a mix of old and new, my newest build will be too.
     

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