Analog SS v Digital SS

Discussion in 'Amp Central Station' started by Bluey, Jan 11, 2019.

  1. Bluey

    Bluey Tele-Meister

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    Hi all. I posted this question in another thread but it was a bit off topic. I have allways been under the impression that Analog SS amps take boost pedals better than Digital SS amps.
    Q. Is this true.
    If so, would a say a 35w Analog SS that takes pedals well be better with a boost pedal to cut through the mix, than say a 50w Digital SS that takes pedals not so well.
     
  2. soulman969

    soulman969 Telefied Ad Free Member

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    I have both and I don't believe that's true or at least not on such a generalized basis as that. There's also virtually no difference in the volume output of 35w vs 50w SS amps regardless of their power amp assuming both are operating with the same speaker.

    Higher speaker sensitivity/efficiency will create more difference in perceived volume than small differences in amp wattage. Even a 3dB difference in sensitivity is noticeable and a 6dB difference would blow you away with added volume.

    My Roland BC 60 is an all analog amp. It takes pedals very well. My 100w Boss Katana is an all digital amp and it takes the exact same pedals very well. They don't sound quite the same because they were designed to sound different but a boost pedal through one works the same as it does with the other.

    Providing an amp is up to what's being asked of it cutting through a live mix has more to do with EQ and fitting into a sonic space than amp power. The type of pickups can also play a role in that.

    Hope this helps.
     
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  3. VintageSG

    VintageSG Friend of Leo's Ad Free Member

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    A lot of this 'cut through the mix' stuff is down to poor EQ settings. The power stage will be analogue, and yes, Class D is analogue.
    From playing about, to the mild annoyance of the staff, with various amplifiers in shops, it seems the bells&whistle amps are EQ'd to compensate for Fletcher-Munson effects at low volume. This carries forward when the volume is raised to give a loud amp with muddy bass and unpleasant treble. Bass carries, so the mud flows. Treble doesn't so much and gets masked. The all important mids, which seemed so nice at lower volumes now get lost. Mids are where guitars live happiest in the mix. Let the bass and drums take care of the low end.

    It isn't down solely to the EQ processing technology, but rather where things are set.

    As for boosting, if the signal saturates the input stage of the digital/analogue converter, you get clipping. Clipping in a valve stage, or a FET stage is/can be very pleasant. Clipping in an op-amp or discrete stage can be pleasant, or it can be nasty. Overloading the front end of an analogue to digital converter, ie, digital clipping sounds ruddy awful. Trying to boost the wrong range of frequencies then amplifying that doesn't auger well for a good sound. You get nasty artefacts, so you cut the EQ, which makes for a sound that is competing for space in the mix.

    Providing you don't push the stages into clipping, there's very little difference. Learn to love your EQ. If you have a valve amp, boost the valves with your overdrive. If you have a solid state or digital, get the sound from the pedal and use the amplifier to amplify that signal. Finesse the tone controls. EQ is your friend.

    A 35 Watt analogue solid state amp with a 100dB/W speaker will be louder than a 50 Watt amp with a 94dB/W speaker. A properly EQ'd amp will be heard. The technology doesn't really matter beyond that.
     
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  4. Bluey

    Bluey Tele-Meister

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    Thanks for the informative replies.
    I had a SS years ago but never bonded with it prob. because I never really understood how they work. After reading alot of threads on this forum I'm thinking of giving one another shot. Maybe a Orange cr35 or 60 with a Two Stroke eq. pedal?
    Thanks again. Cheers.
     
  5. DougM

    DougM Friend of Leo's

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    My experience has been that modeling amps that have very accurate models are very good at also modeling the way any particular amp responds to being pushed into overdrive by a boost or overdrive pedal. That's been my experience with some exceptions, but others may disagree with my conclusion.
     
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