American made Knife Sharpeners

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by PhatBoy, Apr 11, 2019.

  1. TC6969

    TC6969 Friend of Leo's

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    The "Everything made in China is crap" school of thought used to be true in the 50s.

    A CNC machine runs just as well in Beijing as it does in Baltimore.
     
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  2. DFB1

    DFB1 Tele-Meister

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    I live 15 minutes from Spyderco.
    I should stop in and check out the place.:cool:
     
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  3. PhatBoy

    PhatBoy Tele-Afflicted

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    Let me say a few things.......
    First off, every man or country is entitled to make whatever they want. I just want to keep jobs here. Not for me, as I am retired, but for our economy.
    I have MANY different types of sharpeners. Arkansas shines from AR (passing thru). Mainly the simplest types. They don't have to get the knife *razor* sharp, just real sharp. Much more was running through my mind, but can't recall it now.
     
  4. Hobs

    Hobs Tele-Meister

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    I have experience in working with Chinese manufacturing. Here's the quality problem as I see it: When an American company has slipped into the control of the MBA types, they're often not satisfied with the natural drop in cost of Asian manufacturing, and they push the Chinese manufacturers for an even lower price. The folks in China then look for every corner that can be cut to get their profit back up. This is what killed the project I worked on. We got a quote that would have worked, for product that was pretty good. Then the US side money folks pressed to cut the cost in half. The final result was crap.
    Made in China is not so much a problem in itself, but a sign that a product is being made as cheaply as possible.
     
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  5. Kirchensfan

    Kirchensfan Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Rada, small simple, works great, made in Iowa. aaaarada.jpg Less than $10. I have a full set of their knives, too.
     
  6. D_W_PGH

    D_W_PGH Friend of Leo's

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    Change the $40 to $600 based on the current market over there. In terms of an identically made item with identical skill and quality control, no difference. The trouble at this point is being guaranteed of all of those being the same.

    You can get a reputation for making certain things in lower cost markets, like Taiwan and large electric motors. If you get a motor that looks to be good quality and it's been made recently in taiwan, it's probably an awfully good motor.
     
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  7. muscmp

    muscmp Tele-Afflicted

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    sandpaper and it is cheap.

    play music!
     
  8. Mike Simpson

    Mike Simpson Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

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  9. TC6969

    TC6969 Friend of Leo's

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    I have that same one.

    It works great but seems to take off a lot of metal.

    My main kitchen knife is starting to show a slight curve in the edge.
     
  10. imwjl

    imwjl Poster Extraordinaire

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    Yes. I have no advice on product origin except to remind that a worldview with gaps in knowledge might not consider that most quality and innovative products have most of earth as their marketplace these days. Add that we've become so specialized that some areas of the world are best for certain processes and materials.

    Friends who work for two brands I'm sure everyone here recognizes point out that more and more who and where's best and not who is cheapest determines where their stuff is made. My wife's cousin who's an international freight executive points out that policy efforts vs competition usually just accelerates the pace and extent that people are making a plan b to do their commerce anyway.

    It's probably this simple. Many think binary, and they're not thinking or looking outside of their worldview. They're not looking at or realizing how things are now when their worldview is years or decades behind reality.

    I did that but it was years ago now. They discouraged company visits but had a store near by that had nice choices and some bargains.
     
  11. stxrus

    stxrus Friend of Leo's

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    A vote for the Lansky. I have the 5 stone kit. Once you get used to the method it’s a fine sharpener
    I think it’s mostly made here, but don’t quote on that
     
  12. imwjl

    imwjl Poster Extraordinaire

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    My friends in a well known sports gear and others in a well known consumer products company are always saying most of the US is daft to how innovative and competitive people are all over the place.
    I know that's a simple DIY at home fixture like the Spyderco concept but I've not been sure they sharpen serrated edges the way the Spyderco setup does. I'm not married to a particular brand as much as suggest anyone making a purchase get that superb capability to maintain your serrated edges.
     
  13. Musekatcher

    Musekatcher Tele-Afflicted

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    I like a vintage whetstone myself. Many to be had, gathering dust at a flea market or yard sale near you.
     
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  14. Boubou

    Boubou Doctor of Teleocity Gold Supporter

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    I like flat blades and flat diamond stones. It’s so fast to sharpen, wouldn’t want to sharpen a serrated blade, it’s a tool, I want it to cut, not spend time sharpening, 60 seconds and I am done but that’s my choice , I know some people like serrated blades and they certainly do work well. I think (and I could be wrong) that a serrated blade will be useful longer, but if you can sharpen your straight blade in less than 60 seconds, it’s a moot point.
    Looking forward to see what the OP thinks of the work Sharp!
     
  15. Scottz

    Scottz Tele-Holic

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    This is the best way to ruin a good knife edge.
     
  16. telepraise

    telepraise Tele-Meister

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    I don't think people automatically assume inferior quality. Obviously in the world of guitars, the Pac Rim is producing some higher quality work than the original American manufacturers did decades ago.

    As a woodworker for several decades I have seen many of the original American powertool companies sell out to a conglomerate and move their production overseas, producing low cost stuff for big box stores that doesn't last more than a year. Porter Cable comes to mind. After throwing away three $60 palm sanders in as many years, I finally broke down and spent 4x that amount on a made-in-Switzerland Bosch which not only holds up, but is engineered on a whole different level and is a pleasure to use.

    Users of higher end cutlery are not opposed to spending more for a quality tool that you use every day. I spent more for a 6" German knife than a lot of people spend on a whole set of knives, but I love it every time I pick it up and slice veggies with it. It's all relative to your passions and your means. I have enough expendable income I can afford to buy quality and support American producers. I own several made-in-USA pedals that I could have bought a clone of for a fraction of the price, but with all the piracy China has committed, I prefer to put my money in the hands of another American. I realize not everyone has that luxury.
     
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  17. TC6969

    TC6969 Friend of Leo's

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    Oh yes they do!

    China = cheap crap is a deep-seated ingrained prejudice that has been passed down from generation to generation even though its no longer true.

    If an American (The bastion of manufacturing excellence) company made a power tool and expected to compete in today's market, they would cut the same corners in manufacturing and materials and it have the same life expectancy of the ones made overseas.
     
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  18. zippofan

    zippofan Tele-Holic

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    I use a few different sharpeners, Spyderco triangle rods, a Lansky kit, DMT bench stones (which also work for fret dressing touch ups BTW), an Edge Pro Apex for those hard to sharpen tough powder metallurgy steels like CPM S30V, and my good ole Boy Scout carborundum stone in my hiking/camping backpack.

    As far as I know they're all USA made.
     
  19. telemnemonics

    telemnemonics Doctor of Teleocity

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