Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com
Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com
Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com

Ambrosia maple for a neck.

Discussion in 'Tele Home Depot' started by NotAnotherHobby, Sep 24, 2017.

  1. ndeli55

    ndeli55 Tele-Holic

    Age:
    33
    945
    May 12, 2008
    oklahoma
    I don't see why not. It is often softer, but I don't think it's soft enough to worry about.
     

  2. Frank'n'censed

    Frank'n'censed Poster Extraordinaire

    Mar 27, 2011
    Parts Unknown
    Looks like Ambrosia maple to me

    IMG_1835.JPG
    David Pack, Ambrosia
     
    brookdalebill likes this.

  3. NotAnotherHobby

    NotAnotherHobby Tele-Afflicted

    Oct 27, 2015
    Da' Magic Mittin'
    So, you're telling me it's ok to make a neck out of David Pack?







    Ok.
     

  4. R. Stratenstein

    R. Stratenstein Doctor of Teleocity

    Aug 3, 2010
    Loganville, Ga.
    No kind of authority on Ambrosia maple here, but as I understand it, the coloration/patterns are from beetle damage, right? Are there enough beetle tunnels in the wood to weaken it to the point where it would not hold up? Just asking.

    Oh, and David Pack already has a neck, but I don't think he'd be willing to donate it for a guitar, anyway, it's probably the wrong scale.
     

  5. NotAnotherHobby

    NotAnotherHobby Tele-Afflicted

    Oct 27, 2015
    Da' Magic Mittin'
    Nonsense! I can destroy his neck just as easily as I have destroyed all of the necks I've worked on thus far.

    Ambrosia maple has pinholes in it - figuring into maybe 2 - 3 per neck. And they don't go through. I can plug them with toothpicks and/or splinters ala Brian May.

    My concern was the discoloration where the beetles bore into the wood, whether that's weakened or not. But a few tries on an off piece with a chisel seems to confirm that the wood is just as strong as the surrounding wood. Or at least it feels just as strong to me.

    Believe it or not, it was the straightest board in their inventory. It had a knot at one end, and triangular chunk that busted off at the other end.

    And, FWIW, I've got four rough neck blanks that I can now ruin...
     
    Barncaster and Torren61 like this.

  6. TRexF16

    TRexF16 Friend of Leo's

    Apr 4, 2011
    Tucson
    Pictures please. I like Ambrosia maple. Got a big board to ruin in the shop.
    Rex
     
    Barncaster likes this.

  7. Engraver-60

    Engraver-60 Friend of Leo's

    Age:
    65
    Jan 6, 2008
    Franklin, TN
    The beetles can still be in the wood. I've had a few pieces where the little critters have survived being kiln dried, and still blow out when I do wood turning. Ivory boring beetles can survive 10 years inside furniture wood.
     

  8. NotAnotherHobby

    NotAnotherHobby Tele-Afflicted

    Oct 27, 2015
    Da' Magic Mittin'

    Humm...how often is that?

    I've been toying with the idea of flooding the pin holes with CA glue to both stabilize and fill them. I think that might kill them as well as fix them in place.
     

  9. Engraver-60

    Engraver-60 Friend of Leo's

    Age:
    65
    Jan 6, 2008
    Franklin, TN
    It might work, but don't count on it. Ambrosia beetles are pretty hardy, but not as much so as the larger Ivory Spotted Beetles. I just installed 1000 sq. ft. of mixed grade maple t&g flooring, and an Ivory Spotted beetle showed up in the house. Might have come from some of the flooring, as they live in maple, oak and hickory. My wife is scared the floor is being eaten up.
     

  10. NotAnotherHobby

    NotAnotherHobby Tele-Afflicted

    Oct 27, 2015
    Da' Magic Mittin'
    I did a little research on the Ambrosia beetle.

    Apparently, kiln drying usually kills everything as it relates to them. If that doesn't work, then injecting Borax or Bleach into the holes usually does the trick. But, the thing about the fungus is that the beetle harvests it. If the hole clogs with fungus, the larvae will die. Might not happen over night, but it eventually happens.

    And it appears that they only attack soft wood. Usually meaning once it is fully dried, it stops becoming a source of food for them. Likewise, the fungus needs moisture to grow because...well...all fungus needs moisture, and a lot of it. So once it's dried, the beetle is usually toast. if this was a 4 x 4 post, I might have reason for concern, but it is only 7/8" thick. I'm thinking it's pretty dry.

    And, to be frank, they would probably do less damage to the wood than I eventually will...
     

  11. NotAnotherHobby

    NotAnotherHobby Tele-Afflicted

    Oct 27, 2015
    Da' Magic Mittin'
    Well by the time I read this I had already cut the board for rough blanks. However, this is the CSI version of the original plank, missing a few bits and pieces:

    20171001_154420.jpg

    Here are the rough neck blanks and some leftovers:

    20171001_154507.jpg
     

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