Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com
Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com
Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com

Alright, enough's enough...

Discussion in 'Glowing Bottle Tube Amp Forum' started by DannyStereo, Aug 17, 2017.

  1. jsnwhite619

    jsnwhite619 Tele-Afflicted Ad Free Member

    Sep 10, 2013
    Georgia
    Read through a lot of posts, not all, but a lot. I see a lot of members in this conversation that are frequent shock brothers contributors, so hello to yall.

    First off, I'll say that I've never plugged into a tube amp that I just simply couldn't get a tone I like out of. Different from normal, maybe or yes, but nothing that was to the level of "I just can't play this." So, they are crap, isn't really part of my mindset.

    But, I'll add to the guys who first off say, reliability and longevity is a big difference. Those eyelet boards aren't going anywhere. I've built close to a dozen amps, but I've never even considered working on a PCB. That doesn't prove anything, but I know I can't melt an eyelet or fiberboard.

    As is often discussed, if you are cutting costs on the board construction, you are probably cutting costs elsewhere, and the fact is, for a private builder it costs nearly what a reissue costs from the store to pay for the raw materials to build the same amp out of normal, quality components. The transformers alone may run $300 for American/Canadian made transformers that are equivalent to the vintage stuff. Quality pine cabinet will run $250-300, easily. Components, speaker, LABOR for building something that isn't just average off the line, but is RIGHT. Every voltage check as been done and corrected, the transformers are overbuilt and guaranteed for hell or high water, the cabinet is fingerjointed pine with a birch baffle instead of MDF, the carbon comp resistors cost 2-3 times the Chinese stuff on the PCB circuits, Carling & Switchcraft switches, and it's all tuned to exactly what you want, output and response-wise, and the Tweed was shellacked instead of tinted with a spray gun and lacquered, not to mention, applied with hide glue that can be repaired for a lifetime instead of contact cement that has to be knocked off with a belt sander. All that into consideration, and most people expect that private guy to do all that for less than the Mexican or Korean Fender costs a multi-national corporation, that's why reissues get a bad rap. They simply aren't going to last 50 years with just routine maintenance.
     
    robrob, thegeezer and t guitar floyd like this.

  2. DannyStereo

    DannyStereo Poster Extraordinaire

    Aug 13, 2014
    Kelso, Washington
    Nice post. I will say that for those of us who just cannot AFFORD private guy prices, the Reissue line is a good alternative. Sure, an amp may only last 15-20 years, and not 50. But at that rate, I'd be happy with an amp that I paid $700 for and gives me 20 years of use. Seems like a good return on my investment :)
     

  3. MilwMark

    MilwMark Poster Extraordinaire Ad Free Member

    Apr 29, 2013
    near Arnold's
    @DannyStereo - if you want a good laugh, head over to the thread where some poor guy asks about the tweed PRRI with a 12" speaker and the thread immediately goes right to - you guessed it -

    . . . you should really buy a vintage ...
     
    t guitar floyd and DannyStereo like this.

  4. jsnwhite619

    jsnwhite619 Tele-Afflicted Ad Free Member

    Sep 10, 2013
    Georgia
    Oh, I can't afford that stuff either! So, I bought a soldering iron a few years ago, started hanging out in the Shock Brothers section, and started building my own. ;-)
     

  5. DannyStereo

    DannyStereo Poster Extraordinaire

    Aug 13, 2014
    Kelso, Washington
    Lol nothing wrong with a good PRRI. My friend has one and he swapped the speaker to his taste and rocks that thing weekly.
     
    rebelwoclue likes this.

  6. swampyankee

    swampyankee Tele-Meister

    363
    Feb 5, 2015
    Southeastern MA
    Vintage amps were built to the technology of the day. It was the artists of the day that worked with what was at hand to make them sing.

    Reissues of vintage amps are just that, built to be close but not exact replicas. Priced to be in reach of a wide market, not high end buyers. Just like the originals.
    3 of my amps are right out of the '94 Fender catalog. A modern spec Concert Amp, a Vibroverb RI, and a ss Deluxe 112. All have their place, and have proven as reliable as my '70 Dual Showman Reverb.
    I have also done some electronics repair on my little Super Champ XD (effects selector switch), as well as the Showman, and personally, I don't have much more difficulty working on either. Eyelet boards may be easier and simpler for the home repairman, but parts is parts, and soldering is soldering. And besides, hopefully, I spend much more of my time playing my amps than fixing them.
     
    Last edited: Sep 8, 2017

  7. DannyStereo

    DannyStereo Poster Extraordinaire

    Aug 13, 2014
    Kelso, Washington
    When I was 18 I had a Red Knob Dual Showman head running into not one but TWO 4x12s... yikes.
     

  8. ecosse

    ecosse Tele-Meister

    329
    Jul 24, 2011
    Nova Scotia, Canada
    If you go bigger than a Deluxe, a vintage Silverface will likely be cheaper in my experience. Sometimes a third of the price of a new reissue. I find even used, people tend to price their reissue amps very....proudly.

    A TRRI here in Canada is $2000 new. You see them advertised used for $1500. My 73 twin was $600. There's a mid 70's Super Reverb near me for $400. A 66 Bandmaster with 2x12 came up for $1000 a while back. Another twin (76) going for $800. I bet there's wiggle room on it too.

    I've owned Fender reissue amps, and while they can sound good, they don't hold a candle to the old stuff. In my opinion of course. YMMV. Obviously these deals aren't everywhere, but if you're willing to travel a bit, and scour local ads, you'll be surprised what you'll find.

    Not to say reissue amps don't have a place. I haven't had great luck with them though. I wouldn't say they're crap, but they're way overpriced. I've had the reverb stop working just from putting my DRRI in the car and traveling to rehearsal. And a RI cab the buzzed like an old fridge. With some work they can be great sounding, but I can't rely on them when traveling. The old stuff can take a beating. I've sold my reissues and moved on. Couldn't be happier. It helps that I can service them my self.
     
    Last edited: Sep 8, 2017

IMPORTANT: Treat everyone here with respect, no matter how difficult!
No sex, drug, political, religion or hate discussion permitted here.