Alcohol for ColorTone dye

Discussion in 'Finely Finished' started by Jupiter, Apr 15, 2013.

  1. Jupiter

    Jupiter Telefied Silver Supporter

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    hi,

    I'm going to dye a body with Colortone liquid black dye. I've used it before with water, but that raises the grain something fierce, and then when you sand the hair back, it takes some of the color with it. :neutral:

    This time, I thought I'd try alcohol. As I live in Japan, sometimes I have trouble finding stuff that I could quickly locate back in the States. Also, things can be priced quite differently here. :neutral::neutral:

    Anyway, looking for de-natured alcohol, I found two products. One seems to be alcohol for like alcohol burners and stuff. It's about 77% methanol, 21% ethanol, and just a "taste" of isopropyl alcohol. (BTW, for some reason, though the numbers don't quite add up to 100%, these are the only ingredients listed. :confused:). That stuff's about 4 bucks a pint.

    The other thing I found was pure ethanol, which was 15 bucks a pint.

    Naturally, I bought the cheap stuff. But now that I have, I want y'all to tell me if it'll work for dyeing a guitar body.

    Also, I'm putting it on some Indonesian mahogany. Do I need to pre-wet the body (with the alcohol) before dyeing?
     
  2. Cat MacKinnon

    Cat MacKinnon Friend of Leo's

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    it shouldn't really make a difference. i've dissolved dyes in rubbing alcohol before and it was fine, aside from the fact that i did get a little grain-raising since rubbing alcohol usually contains about 20% water. the stuff you bought shouldn't cause any problems.

    mixing with alcohol won't raise the grain like water will, but since it evaporates faster you run a slightly higher risk of lap-marks. normally it's not too big of a deal and you can blend them together if you get them. just a little less open time than with water. since you've only dyed with water-based before, it would probably be a good idea to do a test piece if you can, just to get a feel for how much faster it dries than water-based does.
     
  3. Jupiter

    Jupiter Telefied Silver Supporter

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    Thanks Cat. :)
     
  4. flyingbanana

    flyingbanana Poster Extraordinaire

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    I mix lacquer thinner with denatured alcohol. The thinner keeps things from drying out so fast. A plus is hardly any grain raising.

    The ratio is probably 3 parts alcohol and 2 parts thinner. Then I add the Transtint to get the color I want. I go lighter, and then I build up to the shade I want.
     
  5. Jupiter

    Jupiter Telefied Silver Supporter

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    My ColorTone liquid won't dissolve in thinner--I tried it. But it works if you mix alcohol and thinner? I am a bit concerned about the quick evaporation.

    I think I tried paint thinner, not lacquer thinner though....
     
  6. flyingbanana

    flyingbanana Poster Extraordinaire

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    Lacquer thinner. Also, make a little bit more than you think you'll need. It will only take a few drops more of color and you won't accidentally run out of stuff will staining the wood.
     
  7. Colt W. Knight

    Colt W. Knight Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    Paint Thinner is a form of petroleum distillates like Naptha or Mineral spirits. Colortone/Transtint is not intended for use in oil based products.
     
  8. Jupiter

    Jupiter Telefied Silver Supporter

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    Right. I had read this, but did an experiment myself--and it was true! :lol: I also know that lacquer thinner is different from paint thinner, but I didn't think it was VERY different....

    Wikipedia has cleared this up for me. :cool:
     
  9. flyingbanana

    flyingbanana Poster Extraordinaire

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    I told you LACQUER THINNER. OMG! :D

    That mix works well. I also like using an old tshirt cut into small pieces as an applicator...works great.
     
  10. Jupiter

    Jupiter Telefied Silver Supporter

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    Yeah, I know. That experiment was a year ago. Just a few drops in a thimbleful of p.t. I wasn't clear on the diff between l.t. and p.t. until just today though. :idea:
     
  11. TotallyReptiles

    TotallyReptiles Tele-Meister

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    I tried this today with the mixol tints. I used it in a prevail sprayer since I couldn't find my bag of discarded undershirts to use.
    it went on nicely, and it dried FAST!
    I wanted to see how many coats I needed to get to the darker color of blue I was trying.
    Once I get home, I dying to see how it looks. Ill try to post a pic later on tonight.
     
  12. Colt W. Knight

    Colt W. Knight Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    I believe Mixol is formulated to work with oil base stuff as well.
     
  13. TotallyReptiles

    TotallyReptiles Tele-Meister

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    The mixol website pretty much says Mixol can mix with anything.
    "They are compatible with most water, solvent, lacquer and oil-based stains, coatings, shellacs, epoxies, waxes, varnishes, wood fillers, etc."
     
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