Advice needed- thinking of selling everything and starting again

Discussion in 'Telecaster Discussion Forum' started by ReggiedaDog, Mar 14, 2019 at 4:03 AM.

  1. ReggiedaDog

    ReggiedaDog TDPRI Member

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    Hi, my names Rich, Im 46 and Im a guitaraholic......

    Ill try to keep this short- Ive currently got-
    88 whiteguard Tele
    97 black tele
    17 american pro sonic gray
    93 Gibson Les Paul cherryburst
    97 Blue strat
    ...and the truth is I dont really like any of them! Thats a bit unfair- let me explain

    A buddy of mine is a big believer of the keep it simple club- whilst Im an impulse online buyer he will spend weeks trying and deliberating. He has a modern Les paul with switching etc and a CS 60s pink strat- and thats it- neither of them are my bag to be honest but in terms of playability and good old fashioned mojo they have got it in spades. They inspire him to play and he is enamoured of them. I simply dont feel like that about mine.

    I went through this process a few years ago with acoustics (which is my main gig) I sold half a dozen yamahas, larrivees, takemines etc and bought a lovely Atkin and an OM21 that I love.


    Seriously considering doing the same, selling everything (maybe not the whiteguard) and buying a nice CS guitar or similar and spending time trying them all locally. Or am I chasing the myth of the fabled GAS Killer?

    Has anyone else been through this?

    band wise Im in a garage rock covers band and an acoustic-based function band.
     
  2. Chunkocaster

    Chunkocaster Friend of Leo's

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    Start assembling partscasters using brand name aftermarket necks. You can change the necks and pickups out until you find a combo that sticks and it won't cost a fortune in shipping/selling fees etc. For the price of a CS guitar you can also own several equivalent partscasters.

    Only you know what you want and like in a guitar after decades of playing. The likelihood that some random guy at the custom shop who might not even be able to play well can produce your ideal guitar better than you can yourself with the right spec parts is extremely slim imo. Regardless of the cost.
     
    Last edited: Mar 14, 2019 at 4:24 AM
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  3. Wrighty

    Wrighty Tele-Afflicted

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    Go for it! I recently sold every guitar but two to get to what I knew was my ideal set up. I kept my 2004 Strat Am STD and my old Yamaha acoustic. Added a Butterscotch blonde Am Pro Tele, which matches my Strat, and am now genuinely content. Nothing under the bed that I may play someday so I’ll keep it....................Strat, Tele and acoustic, covers all my bases.................life feels clean and uncluttered.
     
  4. ahnadr

    ahnadr TDPRI Member Silver Supporter

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    Having "The Guitar" definately is a motivator for me. Motivating not only to improve my skills but also motivating to bond with that particular individual instrument.
     
  5. Rayf_Brogan

    Rayf_Brogan Tele-Meister

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    I sold all of my guitars and started over. I didn't have a fabulous collection but I moved some older "vintage" guitars and bought some newer stuff. I'm much happier, the guitars play better than the old stuff and I play a heck of a lot more now than in the past.

    David Crosby said in a interview with Martin guitars that a good guitar makes you want to pick it up and play for hours. I have that now whereas what I thought was a collection of cool old guitars wasn't necessarily the case.
     
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  6. Mpd2378

    Mpd2378 TDPRI Member

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    Sell everything you don't like then, think what you'd really like and get it made by a UK Luthier to your desired spec.

    That's what I'd do
     
  7. Bob M

    Bob M Tele-Afflicted Ad Free Member

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    I've gone down this route and found that it didn't work either. I'm not sure I'll ever be satisfied...
     
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  8. Vermoulian

    Vermoulian TDPRI Member

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    If none of your current guitars really lights your fire, by all means, move them out and move something new in!

    It helps if you can articulate what you're looking for, or at least what you don't like about your current guitars, but there's something to be said for just trying a bunch of different stuff. One of two things will happen: either you'll come upon The One, that guitar that just feels and sounds like it was made for you, or, you'll get a lot of experience. Every guitar you don't like will (hopefully) help you home in on what you DO like.

    I would not necessarily sell them all and buy one expensive guitar unless and until you know that the guitar you really want is [model X in configuration Y], and then it might make sense to put some money into getting a really really good version of that guitar. But until then, I think you're better off trying more different less expensive guitars. If you determine, for instance, "I love Tele ergonomics but this one I have is just dead, or I don't like the tone, or the neck is too thick/thin, etc. etc." then try some different models/necks/pickups/etc. Once you've got all those variables figured out, then it might be time to think about getting a real top of the line guitar that has those characteristics.

    Of course, sometimes you play that certain whatever and it just speaks to you. I've regretted for years letting a few guitars get away, so sometimes you need to follow that feeling. So I'd say be open to that possibility, but unless and until that happens, I'd go for quantity of experience.
     
  9. Bluego1

    Bluego1 Tele-Meister

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    Hast seen the White Whale?
     
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  10. LGOberean

    LGOberean Poster Extraordinaire

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    The "GAS killer" guitar is indeed a myth. Even if you end up finding one guitar that does everything you could need or want, and you wind up enamored with it (to use your word but not your spelling :twisted:), it was your state of mind that ended the GAS, your willingness to accept the fact that you need no other, and not the "perfect" guitar. Guitar Acquisition Syndrome is a state of mind, not a lack of guitars.

    I am like your friend in one respect, in that I deliberate long and hard about every purchase. There have been exceptions to this rule over the years, and I can think of two times where said exceptions worked out well. In the others, they were typically purchases of guitars that served a purpose for the time, but didn't stay.

    I used to be strictly an acoustic guy. In late 2007, I decided it was time for me to own my own electric guitar, and take my 40 years of guitar playing in a new direction. It took me about a month to decide that I wanted a tele, and another six months before I got my first. Now I have four teles, and with each one of them, it's not uncommon for me to put it on a guitar stand or hanger after playing it, but not being able to walk away. I wind up picking it up again. If that's not "enamored," for me it will do until enamored comes along.
     
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  11. ladave

    ladave Tele-Holic

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    Sell everything except the one you might regret, sounds like it’s the white guard tele.

    Then do as chunkocaster said. I recently built a bass and by the time I plugged it in I was already bonded with it.

    If you want to bond with an instrument, spend a lot of time with it. Hard to do if you have a lot of different ones.

    So I say sell all but one, start a build to satisfy the buying “ism” an keep trying others in store and if you find one that’s truly special you will have the money.
     
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  12. nojazzhere

    nojazzhere Poster Extraordinaire

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    I don't gather from your post that you really have an idea of what you want.....just what you DON't want.....am I right?
    My guitar ownership evolved from trying and owning a number of different guitars to using primarily ONE guitar (my Telecaster) and changing bits on it many times until I hit the right combination. This may not work for everybody, but it seems to for me. The ONLY original parts remaining are the body, the control plate, and the strap buttons. In fact, I feel so comfortable with it now, I never actually play any others, and keep my PRS SE One mainly as a backup should a tragedy occur.
    So my advice would be (like several others) to keep a couple, and then explore other guitars, either by trying a LOT of them.....or modifying one repeatedly until you get it right. I can honestly say, I don't have GAS for any other guitars......although, amps might be a different story! ;)
     
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  13. jvin248

    jvin248 Poster Extraordinaire

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    .

    I have had guitars that didn't bond initially ... then change a cap or pots and push the tone around and there is that magic that moves it from a flipper to a keeper.

    Keep the one, sell the rest, and build a partscaster from used parts. Why used? You'll be more likely to find the Mojo than trying to source all the new top end boutique 'best of'. You are seeking Mojo. If say one part of the other guitars is in fact a favorite, like a body or a neck then keep that and build your new (used) guitar out of that piece.

    .
     
  14. ReggiedaDog

    ReggiedaDog TDPRI Member

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    This made me snort my tea
     
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  15. ReggiedaDog

    ReggiedaDog TDPRI Member

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    Thanks all for your considered responses, Im just back from band rehearsal where I annoyed my band by trying lots of guitars. The Les Paul is definitely gonna be sold, it is just not my sound and weirdly makes my hands hurt after a while (it has a 50s neck but doesn't seem much thicker than some of my fenders). The Black tele is going as well for simply no reason as it is a duplicate and, perhaps controversially, Im also going to sell the new American Pro- which is a great guitar but just, and this is just my opinion, seems a little bland?
    The whiteguard is staying, although the pickups are a bit microphonic so they might get changed, but it works well for a variety of tones, and is probably the only guitar I look at and smile (my first electric was an MIJ Tele many years ago). Also, for now, Im keeping the strat as that plays nicely as well, cant call it an inspiring guitar but it is fairly easy to play at home and practice on, and also to take out and teach on- don't think I would ever gig with it though.

    So selling the LP, black Tele and Am Pro will give me about 2 and a half grand, should be enough to buy something tasty - thats close to a custom shop money here in the UK, or perhaps something else entirely.

    Someone suggested that I dont know what I want and they are exactly right, havent a clue, I owned a 335 last year that I didnt like (even though I thought it was my dream guitar before then), although have seen a nice one with p90s that might be worth a look, but somehow I have a feeling I might end up with a really good 2nd Tele or a really good strat- but I need to try a lot and keep an open mind.
     
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  16. Dan R

    Dan R Friend of Leo's

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    The search is part of the fun and part of the process.

    Caution: be careful, ReggiedaDog, once a guitar is gone, it's gone forever. Make sure you want to sell it.
     
  17. ReggiedaDog

    ReggiedaDog TDPRI Member

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    Duly noted, but to be homest the only guitar I would miss is the whiteguard.
     
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  18. JustABluesGuy

    JustABluesGuy Friend of Leo's

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    I’m big on education because it helps one make better decisions. I always suggest playing a bunch and trying to figure out what you actually like in a guitar (besides their color). For example, do you prefer a thin neck, a baseball bat, or does it matter?

    Education makes the search progressively easier. Understanding exactly what you prefer in guitars will really narrow the search down. In other words, try before you buy as much as possible instead of buying in order to try as often happens.

    The ability to do your own setup can help as well. Sometimes the difference between an OK guitar and a great one can come down to fairly minor, but specific adjustments that fit it better to your playing style.

    Good luck with it!
     
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  19. ReggiedaDog

    ReggiedaDog TDPRI Member

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    Necks are funny things aren't they, quite often I sit and try a guitar with a great fat neck and think how comfortable it feels, however whenever Ive had one and played it for two hours at a rehearsal it can be a different story. HOwever I have had the same issue with thin necks as well.
     
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  20. Milspec

    Milspec Friend of Leo's

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    If you have instruments that you do not play, no reason to keep them. Sell them off and upgrade to what you really want. The only problem is do you know what you really want? I would love to get it down to 2 instruments and no more than 3 amps, but everytime that I try I can never decide on which ones were the keepers. If you really know....sell them off to somebody who will play them.
     
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