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Adding resistor to speaker to match impedance?

Discussion in 'Amp Central Station' started by trag-o-caster, May 2, 2004.

  1. trag-o-caster

    trag-o-caster R.I.P.

    Mar 16, 2003
    Flushing, Michigan
    I just read somewhere that you can take an 8 ohm, 10 watt resistor, solder each end to the speaker terminals, and that would make a 4 ohm load out of an 8 ohm speaker. Is this true??? And if so.......

    .... say you wanted to use a 16 ohm speaker with an 8 ohm amp. What to do then? A 16 ohm, 10 watt resistor?

    I found the info last night. Like a fool, I didn't save it. Today I can't find it NOWHERE. Thanks in advance!
     
  2. KokoTele

    KokoTele <img src="http://www.tdpri.com/gifs/vendor.png" /> Vendor Member

    Age:
    41
    Mar 17, 2003
    albany, ny [not chicago]
    Well, there's a couple of problems.

    First, while you technically would be making the setup have the right impedence, you'll be splitting the power delivered between the speaker and resistor. So, your speaker will only see half of the power and therefor have a lower output. And, unless your amp is 20W or less, a 10W resitor ain't gonna cut it.

    Also, resistors are rated in DC resistance, not AC impedence. So your 8 Ohm resistor will have a different impedence.

    If it's a Fender amp, you can use a speaker that's either twice or half the output of the amp and the impedence mismatch won't cause you problems.

    Best to get the right speaker for the job.



     
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