Acoustic build

Discussion in 'Tele Home Depot' started by 1bad914, Apr 29, 2019.

  1. 1bad914

    1bad914 Tele-Meister

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    I currently have a CS-356 build thread going, but a local luthier that builds nothing but acoustics called me and said he was ready to mentor me on a build. I dove right in. He does not mess around. I went to his shop yesterday morning at 8:30 and left 3 hours later. We accomplished the following. Milled the mahogany sides, bent them and set them in forms to dry. Selected mahogany top and bottom and worked them to the point we could glue them up. Cut and made the end and neck blocks. If you cannot tell this will be a D-45 in all mahogany. Like a Martin D-15.
     
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  2. 1bad914

    1bad914 Tele-Meister

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  3. 1bad914

    1bad914 Tele-Meister

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    Now we wait a week for the sides to dry out completely
     
  4. Freeman Keller

    Freeman Keller Tele-Holic

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    A couple of minor comments. I remember from your other thread that you said you were going to build a Gibson D-45 replica - to the best of my knowledge (and I certainly could be wrong) Gibson didn't build that model. Their J-45 is a wonderful guitar and Martin's D-45 with its three piece (originally Braz) backs are stunning. Bracing on D45's is shifted a bit from D28's, some people think that gives them more bass. I have a soft spot of all mahogany guitars and the D-15 is a fine example.

    I'm not sure what you are doing with the wet wood in your third picture - most of us using a Fox style bender just spritz the wood with water, place it between two spring steel slats with a silicon blanket on top, bring it up to temperature and make the bend. Here is Charles Fox at the 2008 GAL conference giving a seminar on side bending,

    IMG_1559.JPG

    Also, don't know why you are waiting a week. Ideally you leave the sides in the bender overnight, then transfer them to the mold, In my humble opinion you can start building immediately after than. However, as I said, I don't soak the wood so there isn't anything to dry out.

    I'll be watching this with interest.

    Edit to add a little anecdote - even tho mahogany is one of the easiest woods to bend, Fox did break a side in that demo. He turned to the audience and said "that happens", picked up another piece and bent the cutaway.
     
  5. 1bad914

    1bad914 Tele-Meister

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    You are correct, I could not find a D-45 in all mahogany, I did find the J-45 though. It is a D-45 mold, but all mahogany. Not sure what I should call it.


    I read about many different ways to bend them, he has his own way so I went with it. I would prefer not to correct a guy that has built many to my none. I will build my own F ox bender soon and I am sure I will come up with my own way of doing it. He mentioned spritzing it instead, but prefers to soak it. We only left it in the bender 15 minutes. It fit right in the mood perfectly.
     
  6. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

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    I've done about 10 acoustics via the fox bender. The spritzing is characteristic of the Fox method. The idea of soaking comes from earlier texts like Irving Sloane, who soaked the sides in a trough and probably earlier Classical techniques if the truth is known.

    I tried soaking and also built a tube steamer before settling on the fox design, which employs the 3 light bulbs, which is what Fox used back in the early days. I'd probably let the wood dry out some more too if I soaked it, but with the spritzing, you can start to work on it the next day. No sense in biting the hand that feeds you though :).

    This is the last one I actually finished. I have a maple one here from last year that I'm not too thrilled about.


    parlor.jpg
     
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  7. 1bad914

    1bad914 Tele-Meister

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    He also stated that we could take them out by Wednesday, but our schedules did not match, so it is a week.
     
  8. otterhound

    otterhound Poster Extraordinaire

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    Since comments are coming , the D-35 Martin uses the 3 piece back . The D-45 is definitely 2 piece bookmatched . The standard D-28 uses straight bracing while the HD-28 is scalloped . D-45 is scalloped .
     
  9. Freeman Keller

    Freeman Keller Tele-Holic

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    Otter, you are correct - I was thinking D35 with the 3 piece back. D45 is the totally blinged out version

    1bad, all the Martin dreads are the same size, the Gibson J is slightly different. By their current nomenclature an all mahogany dread would be a D15. There were some wonderful all mahogany guitars from the 1930's that were the x17 series but they now use 17 for a spruce topped guitar.

    Here is my little all mahogany double ought sized guitar. Inspired by the 00-17's of the Depression era.


    IMG_1660.JPG
     
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  10. Ronnie2shoes

    Ronnie2shoes TDPRI Member

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    Not bad for 3 hours work.
     
  11. RickyRicardo

    RickyRicardo Friend of Leo's

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    Not sure if this was posted before but it's the most detailed video of an acoustic build I've seen. A bit of marketing but that's to be expected.
     
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  12. Tonetele

    Tonetele Poster Extraordinaire

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    I have built one Stewmac Mahogany B/s and AAA Spruce top for a guy back in 2004. I have the plans for an OM and and I think that'll be the last guitar I build. So satisfying to measure, measure, measure then proceed at all levels of a build. I have got a picture of it on my phone but don't know how to upload it. Sorry people. Building an acoustic is way more satisfying than an electric. I recommend you do it once in your life.
    BTW that Stewmac Martin type is 15 years old and the guy won't sell it. It really sounds good and they were a delightful company to work with. They even replaced sides and end blocks FREE when it swelled out in drying. Good people.:)
     
  13. crazydave911

    crazydave911 Poster Extraordinaire

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    This discussion is hurting my head lol. The difference between Martin and Gibson dreadnoughts are many and varied but the most obvious is the slope shoulders and sound of the Gibson. I'll let dear Molly Mason make my point

     
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  14. Freeman Keller

    Freeman Keller Tele-Holic

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    I couldn't agree more. I just wasn't quite sure which size and shape 1bad914 is building

    I have a little acoustic guitar in the final stage of construction right now. I've been posting progress pictures at the WOYWBT thread since I really didn't think it rated its own build thread on a telecaster forum, but I certainly encourage everyone to build an acoustic or two.

    I'll watch 1bad's progress and chime in from time to time

    (and just curious, 1bad - are you a vintage Porsche fan?)
     
  15. 1bad914

    1bad914 Tele-Meister

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    Yes I am. I have owned many. I started restoring VW’s and slowly transitioned to Porsche. The nickname came from the first one I ever restored. It was actually the first car I ever painted also. I have owned almost every model, 356, 911,914, 924, 928 and 944. I currently own none, sold a 1969 911 and a 1984 911 a few years ago and kind of retired from cars.
     
  16. Freeman Keller

    Freeman Keller Tele-Holic

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    I considered buying a 912 when I got out of college in 1969, bought something else instead. Recently sold my 1975 2002 (and my harley) but I still have the Morgan. Sorry about the thread drift, if there is a guitar in the picture does that make it OK?

    IMG_0184.JPG

    IMG_0169.JPG
     
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  17. 1bad914

    1bad914 Tele-Meister

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    Makes it okay by me.
     
  18. 1bad914

    1bad914 Tele-Meister

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    The 84 and 69. AB817D66-640A-4427-88BA-281E5A95FEA5.jpeg
     
  19. jondanger

    jondanger Poster Extraordinaire

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    Cool 2002. My dad had a TI that I spent a lot of time in. It succumbed to the dreaded rear wheel well rust.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  20. Freeman Keller

    Freeman Keller Tele-Holic

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    Well, to sort of bring it back to your build, two of the guitars in the first picture are Martin dreads - that is their classic 14 fret square shoulder design - from D1 to D100, they are all the same. The Yamie is a weird size that doesn't really fit anything. All four in that picture are from the 70's. The two guitars in the second picture are basically OM/000 sized, both are 12 fretters. The 12 string is extremely long scale and is tuned in the cellar, the tricone is just a barky little blues box.

    The 911's are sweet - I came close to a 912 but it just wouldn't work for a growing family and pulling a race boat.
     
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