Acoustic build

Discussion in 'Tele Home Depot' started by printer2, Apr 10, 2013.

  1. printer2

    printer2 Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    6,245
    Joined:
    May 24, 2010
    Location:
    Canada
    Other than my parlor Stella I haven't heard any small guitars so not much to compare it to. I did give it a 4" body as I did not want something sounding thin. Snappy is a good description.

    Hmmm... ... actually my batteries crapped out not long after taking the vid. It should have occurred to me.
     
  2. orangedrop

    orangedrop Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    2,049
    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2010
    Location:
    New York
    It would seem that you caught my pun as you were typing.:lol:

    Stool, crap, stool, crap?
     
  3. printer2

    printer2 Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    6,245
    Joined:
    May 24, 2010
    Location:
    Canada
    Walked by a pallet at work a number of times noticing it did not look like SPF, decided I have enough projects and did not care. But it never went away and my curiosity got the best of me. Turned out to be birch. Might go well with the red oak fretboard I have left over that originally started out as a pallet also. Would be interesting to make another parlor but with hardwood back and sides. Wonder what I need to do to bend this stuff?

    [​IMG]
     
  4. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

    Posts:
    19,811
    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2003
    Location:
    Ontario County
    That probably will just require a bit more time to bend....maybe not even....
     
  5. printer2

    printer2 Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    6,245
    Joined:
    May 24, 2010
    Location:
    Canada
    Thinking of doing a cedar to compare with the previous one and maybe a ladder braced one with a pine top. That is if I end up with two sets of sides bent.
     
  6. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

    Posts:
    19,811
    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2003
    Location:
    Ontario County
    That stuff looks quartersawn....it looks more mahogany-like to me...than birch which should be looking like maple.
     
  7. printer2

    printer2 Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    6,245
    Joined:
    May 24, 2010
    Location:
    Canada
    Quartersaw, yes. Mahogany, I only wish. Split the boards and put them through my drum sander. Took a while for the little 1/4 hp motor. Looks a little lighter cleaned up.

    [​IMG]
     
  8. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

    Posts:
    19,811
    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2003
    Location:
    Ontario County
    I guess that looks more like birch now...birch is cool.:) quartered is a nice feature of free wood.
     
  9. printer2

    printer2 Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    6,245
    Joined:
    May 24, 2010
    Location:
    Canada
    I sanded one set down to 0.09" and one 0.10" for the backs and 0.085" for the sides. Going to have to find my side bending stuff and rig up a jig to cut the edges straight to glue them. After that as much as it is hard for me to do I might put this project on the back burner, just was itching to do something with wood. The humidity in the house is just around 20%, I probably should have it at least between 30-40%. Might be time for me to make that humidity controlled box like I have been planning. And I do have a couple of amps I should finish.

    The pine and cedar I plan on using, maybe should call these two Salt and Pepper.

    [​IMG]
     
  10. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

    Posts:
    19,811
    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2003
    Location:
    Ontario County
    nice looking stuff
     
  11. printer2

    printer2 Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    6,245
    Joined:
    May 24, 2010
    Location:
    Canada
    Pine from HD, searched through a few to find that board. Same with the cedar except that one was destined to being a fence board. Both will be three piece tops.
     
  12. printer2

    printer2 Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    6,245
    Joined:
    May 24, 2010
    Location:
    Canada
    Decided on the neck material. Found these in my dad's garage when I cleaned it out last year. I am guessing they have been there at least 20 years, looks kind of like mahogany to me, 3/4" x 1 5/8" x 8' with either a 1/4" tongue or grooved side. I am thinking of laminating three pieces together.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Seems I was mistaken and it is a wood called selangan batu. Ut will be interesting to see what it will look like with a finish on it.
     
    Last edited: Mar 20, 2014
  13. printer2

    printer2 Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    6,245
    Joined:
    May 24, 2010
    Location:
    Canada
    Have not been making much sawdust, blew the motor in the table saw, really was not the proper motor but I got it for free so not much to complain about. So then I looked around at what my options were to replace the motor or get a new saw. Motor about $200, cheap saws $200. While the saw I had was cast iron and built like a tank you could not do much accurately with it without spending all day setting it up. The cheap saw, well what do you want for $200?

    Unless they have a better one on sale for about the same price. Aluminum top rather than plastic, won't take much abuse but I do not see doing much more than making a couple of guitars or amps every once in a while. Brought it home and mounted it to a pair of cabinets that were cut out and removed at work. I put wheels under it before and can roll it in and out of the way. Space is limited, just half a double garage, got to make the most of it. Don't have the vacuum system hooked up yet, needed to see what it could do.

    [​IMG]

    The smallest form was from my previous build. The biggest is a OM sized guitar, the middle one I copied the shape of a small Stella. Decided to use the Stella size for the two guitars I was going to build. The OM, I am going to do a white oak with cedar top and probably a mahogany neck. Got a fair amount of work ahead for myself.
     
  14. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

    Posts:
    19,811
    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2003
    Location:
    Ontario County
    I guess it all depends on what you use a table saw for. I have found that a tablesaw isn't critical to my guitar making. I bought a Skil cheapie like yours to make some shed doors a few years back, but other than ripping some kerfs in a wide board for resawing one time... it hasn't seen any more use here. I'm of course not making anything other than guitar parts. There aren't very many straight lines on a guitar. This is another YMMV tool I guess. For me, anything that needs to be straight gets done on the bandsaw , jointer, or router table.
     
  15. printer2

    printer2 Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    6,245
    Joined:
    May 24, 2010
    Location:
    Canada
    Oh it is not so much for doing guitar parts but rather the tooling to make the guitar. I have to make a decent binding jig, neck slot jig, all the other little fixtures that makes life easier. Also for the amp cabs I build once in a while. Not a lot of use but enough to justify $200.




    Thinking about it, a good bandsaw, yeah I probably could get by without the table saw.
     
    Last edited: Aug 4, 2014
  16. printer2

    printer2 Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    6,245
    Joined:
    May 24, 2010
    Location:
    Canada
    I called up a local luthier and asked if I could come down and he could look at my guitar and give me some tip from what he could see. I did not want to bother him that long as time is money and it looked like he had enough work to do but by the time I left he spent a good hour with me. Aside from the obvious mistakes I did like reversing the direction of the middle section of the three piece top (which he did not mention) he gave me some tips and where I went wrong (head block and tail block oriented the wrong way for one), he said sonically there is nothing wrong with it.

    He said it sounded fine and had good volume for the size of guitar. He played it for a bit and I must admit it was the best I heard it sound. He was surprised that the back and sides were made of pine, after that telling him the top originally was a fence board didn't seem all that odd, neither the fretboard previous life was a pallet. He commented on the truss rod and the design I used helped out in the neck stability. It was my turn to be surprised as I sent him a link to the above picture as a introduction, seems that he took enough of an interest to look at the rest of my construction pics.

    He said lot of my methods were not too different than normally done, it would just take longer with the tools I had. He gave me some suggestions as far as longevity and how I can make the guitars more playable (I still have to set the neck angle a little better). When we started talking about amplifier design and that I have a few tube amps under my belt I decided to say thanks and run off as I felt he was more than generous with his time. He said he would like to see guitar number ten and that I had a good start with number one, even with the added difficulty with my wood selection. I did not know what to expect when I walked through his door but he made me feel like I would be welcome to return again.

    It was a good day.
     
IMPORTANT: Treat everyone here with respect, no matter how difficult!
No sex, drug, political, religion or hate discussion permitted here.


  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.