Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups darrenriley.com
Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com
Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com

A chambered LPish looking thing

Discussion in 'Tele Home Depot' started by Freeman Keller, Sep 20, 2018.

  1. Freeman Keller

    Freeman Keller Tele-Meister

    Age:
    73
    329
    Aug 22, 2018
    Washington
    My understanding of your question is that your Blueridge has style 45 trim which means the edge of the fretboard extension down to the sound hole and that has a fairly thick finish. First, I purposely don't do that little bit of inlay because it would be really easy to screw it up. However the f/b extension should be over the top of the top finish and should come off with the usual application of heat. Martin 45 series guitars get neck resets just like any other - I would seek out an authorized Martin tech and discuss.

    edit to add, here is a vid of removing a neck from a D45 - looks like a normal neck reset to me.

     
    Last edited: Sep 28, 2018
  2. guitargumption

    guitargumption TDPRI Member

    Age:
    38
    21
    Sep 16, 2018
    Portland, OR
    You are a climber too? Sweet.

    Looking great! I did one sorta LP junior shaped build with a carve about as shallow as the one you are doing, and I noticed you get almost the same effect as a much deeper carve.
     
  3. Freeman Keller

    Freeman Keller Tele-Meister

    Age:
    73
    329
    Aug 22, 2018
    Washington
    I'm old and weak but I still drag my sorry butt up a few easy crags....

    OK, back to the building. I'm going to put the body on the back burner for a while and concentrate on the neck. Different people have different ways of carving necks, I'll show mine but if you do it some other way, power to you. One important thing is that I don't glue the fretboard on until its been fretted (and bound) - I think I do a better job of fretting if I don't have all the neck irregularities to worry about.

    First thing is to mark some important measurements on the neck - width and depth at the nut and 12th fret and width at the body joint (16 fret). A lot of things come together at the body so thats really critical. As I said before, I do every operation that requires square sides before I cut any angles, but when all that is done I cut the tapered sides

    [​IMG]

    Slip it into the body (I'll be doing this a lot)

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Then start removing everything that doesn't feel like a neck

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Checking with those little templates that I made from the old Lester

    [​IMG]

    Its not there yet, but getting close

    Had a tiny blowout at one corner of the head, glued it back together.

    [​IMG]

    Good place to stop for the evening
     
    Last edited: Sep 28, 2018
    twr102, Johnny7s, Barncaster and 4 others like this.
  4. TRexF16

    TRexF16 Friend of Leo's

    Apr 4, 2011
    Tucson
    I'm loving this. Your work is amazing.
    Rex
     
    LPTyler likes this.
  5. Freeman Keller

    Freeman Keller Tele-Meister

    Age:
    73
    329
    Aug 22, 2018
    Washington
    Before we go any farther, I just want to say thanks to all you nice people who have liked something I've posted or have commented on it.

    Now moving on. A few days ago I book matched two scrap pieces of the Spanish cedar. Now I'll put my little template on, route the head shape and drill the tuner holes

    [​IMG]

    Plane the headplate to 1/16 (the head itself is 1/2, that gives a final thickness that will work with the tuners) and glue it on

    [​IMG]

    Put it away for a while.
     
    LPTyler and awasson like this.
  6. awasson

    awasson Friend of Leo's Gold Supporter

    Age:
    54
    Nov 18, 2010
    Vancouver
    Wow! Inspiring work. I love everything about this.

    As I’m reading through this I’m considering how I plan to outfit my small workshop so that I can attempt something like this in the future. The acoustics are works of art too.

    Thanks for describing your mindset and order of operations when approaching this. It’s so important for those of us who have yet to attempt something complex like a Les Paul, carved top, set neck guitar.
     
  7. 24 track

    24 track Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

    Nov 6, 2014
    kamloops bc

    Outstanding work! and goreous work!
     
  8. 24 track

    24 track Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

    Nov 6, 2014
    kamloops bc
    I am speachless when i see this type of skill at play !
     
  9. djh22

    djh22 Tele-Holic Ad Free Member

    Age:
    62
    643
    Jan 12, 2012
    VA
    You, sir, are an artist!
     
  10. Freeman Keller

    Freeman Keller Tele-Meister

    Age:
    73
    329
    Aug 22, 2018
    Washington
    My workshop is about as basic as can get and still get the job done. I know some folks build a cello on the kitchen table with a pocket knife and that some others here have about every power tool in the Grizzly catalog. I have a pretty minimum shop that has grown as I build each guitar. It might help you to think about yours if I tell you about mine.

    First, it is the corner of a three car garage. That is far from ideal, particularly as far as controlling dust and fumes and temperature and humidity. But its what I got and I've built almost two dozen guitars there. Here is the overall view

    IMG_4606-1.jpg

    There are two parts - the workbench itself with most of the hand tools and things I need close by

    IMG_4608-1.jpg

    And a lower table (actually a metal desk that I picked up somewhere) with my drill press, belt sander, glue pot and a few other things I use frequently

    IMG_4607-1.jpg

    My little band saw is on casters, it can be pushed against the wall or pulled out if I need more room. Under the band saw are boxes of wood that I might need (the real stash is in the basement of my house). Also, my "dust collection" system is a shop vac that I plug into whatever machine I am using at the time - needless to say there is a lot of dust that gets loose.

    One of the keys to making all this work is that my garage has an attic and I can put away any tool that I don't need. That includes my cheap little portable table saw and router table - I have a pulley system that can lower them into the "shop" when I need them, put them away when I don't.

    Each time I build a guitar I make an outside body mold and an inside bending mold. I also have a Fox style bender which lives in the attic. So I get the bender out, bend some sides and bindings, then put it and the mold away.

    [​IMG]

    My go bar deck also lives in the attic and comes out to play when its needed. Here is bracing an acoustic back with the sides in the mold

    [​IMG]

    Home finishing is a huge hassle, especially in an unheated garage with three cars in it. I do it one of two ways, either take the guitar outside on a nice warm day or put together a little cardboard "spray booth" that attempts to catch the overspray.

    [​IMG]

    The cardboard gets all folded up and put away upstairs too. With the guitar in this thread I'm hoping that the weather will remain nice enough to do the finishing outside. We can talk more about that when the time comes.

    The other thing that has been helpful is that each instrument represents something new - a different shape or construction method or whatever. I think about what would have made the last one easier or might be needed for this one and add a tool or fixture or jig to my collection. That way I've slowly accumulated all the expensive little gizmos that seem to be overflowing my bench.
     
    Last edited: Sep 29, 2018
    twr102, Johnny7s, Piggy Stu and 4 others like this.
  11. awasson

    awasson Friend of Leo's Gold Supporter

    Age:
    54
    Nov 18, 2010
    Vancouver
    Thanks for the tour of the shop and don’t think I didn’t notice the road bike hanging vertically, the motorbike on the right side or the wire wheel on the car under the car cover. All very familiar items in my local but since I don’t have a garage with my house, they are located where space allows. My roller cabinet and tools are currently located in a coat closet and I’ve got my parts bins fastened to the wall above the roller cab with a shelf for finishing products above. It is cramped. I often do fret leveling, pre finishing and assembly on the dining room table or kitchen counter. Finishing is accomplished outside, weather permitting.

    I’m encouraged after seeing your shop! I hope to tackle my proper shop next spring. Local zoning only allows for 40% use of the lot size and we maxed out when we renovated and added our in-house office and a fancy master suite upstairs. The downside was no garage. I may challenge the city to see if I can sway them but it’s doubtful so the only clear option I have is to lay a concrete pad and put up a shed in my back garden. I can got 10’ x 10’ with a mezzanine. I’ve got a similar drill press, a cheap craftsman table saw, small router and numerous hand tools, chisels, hammers, etc... I like the idea of the rope driven system to bring things up and down from the attic. I’ll have to incorporate that idea in mine and only bring down the table saw or router table when it’s needed. Clamps.... I need more clamps and a hot pipe too.

    Thanks again. I’ve got work to do.
     
  12. idjster

    idjster VERY grateful member Silver Supporter

    Absolutely brilliant work! Thanks for this great thread!
     
  13. jimbo735

    jimbo735 Tele-Afflicted

    Sep 19, 2011
    Michigan
    Do we get to see the car under the cover too!:)
    Thank you for sharing all this wonderful talent!
     
  14. Freeman Keller

    Freeman Keller Tele-Meister

    Age:
    73
    329
    Aug 22, 2018
    Washington
    The car under the cover is a '63 Morgan Plus 4. This picture was from a long ago tongue in cheek thread about cars and guitars at another forum - trying to rationalize my love for both. The idea is that Morgan is a "modern classic" sports car, my guitars were modern versions of very classic designs. You probably had to be there to understand....

    [​IMG]

    Oh, and as you probably know, Morgans have wood frames

    Sorry about the thread drift, I'll get back to the guitar tomorrow
     
    gtrplr, zippofan, twr102 and 8 others like this.
  15. awasson

    awasson Friend of Leo's Gold Supporter

    Age:
    54
    Nov 18, 2010
    Vancouver
    I knew that was English and my first inkling was that it might be a Morgan. I’ve worked on a few of those but that was years ago. They made them, the 4 wheeled models into the 80’s. Aluminum body over a wooden frame. Neat cars.

    Thanks for indulging us. Looking forward to more guitar tomorrow.
     
  16. Freeman Keller

    Freeman Keller Tele-Meister

    Age:
    73
    329
    Aug 22, 2018
    Washington
    Lets get back to what we are really here for. And I have to apologize that I only took a couple of pictures of the next steps - remember, what I'm trying to do is build a guitar, not write a book.

    Anyway, before we did the garage tour I had glued the headplate on the headstock, now the glue is dry so I drilled the tuner holes and routed a binding channel around the head. I had bent up some little pieces of rosewood back when I had the hot pipe out, now its time to glue them on. The one on the end was kind of tricky - to clamp it I put two drill bits thru tuner holes, and clamped a block of wood against them (the bits keep it from moving when I apply the binding clamps). Anyway, I did take a picture of it, unfortunately the camera wanted to focus on the clamps instead of the wood

    [​IMG]

    Here the head is with all the little bits of binding glued on. Eliminating that little dimple in the center of the head does two things - it makes it not look like a Gibson and it makes the binding infinitely easier.

    [​IMG]
     
    twr102, LPTyler, Barncaster and 3 others like this.
  17. Freeman Keller

    Freeman Keller Tele-Meister

    Age:
    73
    329
    Aug 22, 2018
    Washington
    Shiny stuff arrived this morning.

    [​IMG]

    I still don't understand why it costs me more for a small box of hardware than a complete very nice MIC guitar. I'm certainly not doing this to save money.
     
    Macrogats, LPTyler and awasson like this.
  18. RickyRicardo

    RickyRicardo Friend of Leo's

    Mar 27, 2012
    Calgary, Alberta
    But we know why you're doing it!!:cool: Awesome build!
     
  19. Freeman Keller

    Freeman Keller Tele-Meister

    Age:
    73
    329
    Aug 22, 2018
    Washington
    I'm going to make two confessions before I start this posting. First, I buy my fretboards pre slotted and pre radiused. A long time ago I made a fretboard for a dulcimer, got a couple of frets a bit off and it doesn't play in tune. I understand the math behind fret spacing, I'm probably capable of sawing 20 or so little slots in a piece of wood, but I prefer to have someone with a big fancy cnc do it for me. The main reason is that I have built everything from a mandolin to a faux baritone, with just about every scale lengths you can imagine. For 30 bucks or so I can call LMII and tell them exactly what I want and it will be perfect. Some day I may build a miter box and all the templates for all the different scales, for now I'll just say that I didn't make the fretboard.

    Second admission, I don't cut my own pearl. I tried it, bought a jewelers saw and made the little holder - it turned out OK but I really wasn't happy with it. I don't like a lot of pearl on my guitars but I do like to put my initials on the headstock. It is so easy to go to Andy Depaul's web side, pick the pearl I want (the initials are like five bucks each) and be done with it.

    OK, with that off my back, this was inlay day. Trace the little F and K on the headplate (they are laying on the workbench next to the toothbrush) and route cavities with a Dremel. I've got a desk lamp lighting the work and put on my best reading glasses

    [​IMG]

    The F and K are cut so they can be intertwined and then are set in epoxy that has some sanding dust of the parent wood

    [​IMG]

    Same thing with the fretboard - excavate the cavities for the markers and inlay them in epoxy with rosewood dust

    [​IMG]

    In keeping with the warmth of the Spanish cedar and the gold hardware, these are gold mother of pearl. Here are the finished head and fretboard

    [​IMG]

    Oh, one more little detail - I know I don't want a plastic truss rod cover on this so I tried making one out of some rosewood scraps. Not sure if I totally like it or not, we'll wait and see.

    edit to add, I hadn't put the first fret block in but decided to go ahead and add it after the picture was taken
     
    Last edited: Oct 2, 2018
    twr102, Johnny7s, 24 track and 5 others like this.
  20. R. Stratenstein

    R. Stratenstein Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

    Aug 3, 2010
    Loganville, Ga.
    Great, entertaining thread. Beautiful work. I wish I could manage to be as organized as you.
     
    24 track likes this.
IMPORTANT: Treat everyone here with respect, no matter how difficult!
No sex, drug, political, religion or hate discussion permitted here.