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A chambered LPish looking thing

Discussion in 'Tele Home Depot' started by Freeman Keller, Sep 20, 2018.

  1. BB

    BB Poster Extraordinaire

    May 17, 2003
    Great Pacific NW
    Exactly what 24 track said. You have. Some. Amazing skills there Freeman. I'd love to see some of you acoustics.
     
    24 track likes this.

  2. Macrogats

    Macrogats Tele-Afflicted

    Age:
    51
    May 15, 2017
    Auckland, New Zealand
    Yeah, I'm loving those binding channels and the carving work.
     

  3. jkingma

    jkingma Super Moderator Staff Member

    Admin Post
    I use a couple Kreg screws in the area along the edge that gets cut off. They also help apply a bit of clamping pressure.
     
    ctmullins likes this.

  4. Freeman Keller

    Freeman Keller Tele-Meister

    Age:
    73
    121
    Aug 22, 2018
    Washington
    Well, gosh, if you insist. These little hollow boxes seem a long way from a telecaster, but here are a couple of the interesting ones.

    First, I wanted to make a little girly guitar for my daughter. Figured I better make one for myself too (I'm a girly-guy). Based on Joan Baez's 0-42, Lutz over Mad rose on one, Braz on the other.

    [​IMG]

    My daughter's spirit animal is the blue darner dragonfly

    [​IMG]

    Here is the single ought with a mahogany double ought and a spruce triple. Size matters (sort of)

    [​IMG]

    I like 12 strings and own an old Martin (on the left), but never really bonded with it. In the center is my take on a fingerstyle 12, Sitka over ERI, OM body, 25.4 scale, tuned D to D.

    On the right is my tribute to the wonderful old Stella and Schmidts - Adi over mahoghany, 000 body, 26.5 scale, strung with cables and tuned in the cellar

    [​IMG]

    That picture shows some interesting things regarding scale length, number of frets clear, bridge location....

    I'm kind of proud of this one, a koa tricone resonator. Most tricones are metal (NRP makes a few woodies) - when played gently with flesh and nails this has an almost acoustic sound, when you dig in its got a real bark

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    This is my current squeeze. I had been hording some cocobolo down in the wood room, last spring I decided it was time to build my dream acoustic. WRC over coco, traditional OM size and bracing. Nothing fancy but all the things I like.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    now back to your regularly scheduled chambered LP thing

    ps - I'm a crappy photographer
     
    Last edited: Sep 24, 2018
    Piggy Stu, fmmlp, 24 track and 12 others like this.

  5. Freeman Keller

    Freeman Keller Tele-Meister

    Age:
    73
    121
    Aug 22, 2018
    Washington
    Got thru show and tell, eh? Started by laying out some critical measurements on the top - scale, pickups and neck pocket. Started hogging out excess wood

    [​IMG]

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    There is a little part of the recurve in the inside of the horn that needs to be dealt with. That is a tricky area on arched topped guitars - if you make the top symmetrical here (from side to side) then the binding must get taller in the horn. I prefer to pitch the top down to the recurve but I want to wait until I've fitted the neck and f/b extension
     
    Last edited: Sep 25, 2018
    awasson likes this.

  6. Freeman Keller

    Freeman Keller Tele-Meister

    Age:
    73
    121
    Aug 22, 2018
    Washington
    Also continuing on with the necks. I'm building one for a ES175ish thing - it has a tall heel and will get a dovetail joint. The other will have a long tenon for a typical LP joint. One thing that I have learned about neck building is that if I think about each operation and the order that they should be done I can save myself a lot of work. For example I try to do everything I can with flat square sides and top before any angle cuts are made.

    First route the truss rod channels

    [​IMG]

    There was an article in AL a while back comparing different kinds of truss rods, their conclusion was that the classic curved compression rod is the most powerful as far as moving the neck but has some real disadvantages. I happen to like LMII double acting rods - one very big reason is that the cavity for the adjuster is so much smaller. Anyway, after routing the channel I bump the fence on the router table a hair and put a tiny relief at the adjuster. The LP neck is on top, 175 below

    [​IMG]

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    You can see the line for the scarf joint a couple inches down the neck - that whole surface was carefully leveled with a big sanding beam.

    One of the nice things about building a neck from 1 x 3 material is that a Gibson style head will just fit without any ears. I modify the head slightly to make it my own, but here is the template (taken from the StewMac LP plans) being sketched on the neck blanck.

    [​IMG]

    I actually rotate the template slightly so the bottom points are also 3 inches wide - that makes a better string line to the tuners. The standard LP layout above has the strings getting very close to tuner posts. I also round the top of the head and eliminate the dimple - makes binding infinitely easier.

    Almost forgot to mention, I have also marked on the neck the width of the nut and the fact that it will be on the flat part of the neck. That obviously is really important when it comes time to measure frets, body joint, scale length,...
     
    Last edited: Sep 25, 2018

  7. djh22

    djh22 Tele-Holic Silver Supporter

    Age:
    62
    595
    Jan 12, 2012
    VA
    Absolutely beautiful work!
     

  8. Freeman Keller

    Freeman Keller Tele-Meister

    Age:
    73
    121
    Aug 22, 2018
    Washington
    The other thing that can be done now while the neck is nice and square is to cut out the tenon. I have marked the 12th and 16th fret locations relative to the nut and cut the sides and bottom of the tenon on the band saw. There are a couple of angles at the heel cheeks that will need to be cleaned up later

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
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  9. BB

    BB Poster Extraordinaire

    May 17, 2003
    Great Pacific NW
    Simply stunning acoustics Freeman.
     

  10. rscalzi

    rscalzi Tele-Holic

    Age:
    55
    918
    Jun 7, 2010
    Macomb MI
    Those are some beautiful acoustics. Really dig the resonator!
     

  11. Freeman Keller

    Freeman Keller Tele-Meister

    Age:
    73
    121
    Aug 22, 2018
    Washington
    I can't believe that I didn't take a picture actually routing out the neck pocket, but there isn't one on the camera so I guess I was just having too much fun. Anyway, that's another one of those think about the sequence things - my jig screws into the neck pickup cavity, if I had already routed for the pups I would be screwing into air. Take my word for it, I routed the pocket at 2-1/2 degrees because thats what the top is.

    [​IMG]

    Did a little finessing with the tenon and it drops in place nicely

    [​IMG]

    Showing off, the weight of the body is supported by the fit of the tenon into the pocket. Actually that might be a little too snug

    [​IMG]
     
    LPTyler, djh22, awasson and 5 others like this.

  12. mangus

    mangus Tele-Meister

    Age:
    35
    255
    Nov 2, 2016
    Portugal

  13. Freeman Keller

    Freeman Keller Tele-Meister

    Age:
    73
    121
    Aug 22, 2018
    Washington
    Went climbing today so I didn't get much done. Routed the pickup pockets. First drill out the waste (wasn't there just a thread about drill bits? I use Forstner bits a lot for both making big holes and for removing wood)

    [​IMG]

    Screw the template down with two of the p/u ring mounting screws

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    The neck pickup cavity takes a bit off the end of the neck, there is still a bit of tenon in the bottom of the cavity.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Sep 26, 2018

  14. boredguy6060

    boredguy6060 Friend of Leo's

    Mar 28, 2012
    Sou Cal
    You have some seriously mad skills.
    LP looks great and I can’t wait to see it finished, but those acoustics are just works of art.
    Mad mad skills bro!
     

  15. boredguy6060

    boredguy6060 Friend of Leo's

    Mar 28, 2012
    Sou Cal
    Just curious, on your acoustics, I see you have abalone inlays, is it actual abalone or abalam? Not sure about the spelling.
    It’s that adhesive abalone overlay.
    I always thought that the inlay would be a real pain to do, but looks beautiful.
     

  16. Freeman Keller

    Freeman Keller Tele-Meister

    Age:
    73
    121
    Aug 22, 2018
    Washington
    The greenish material is Paua abalone which comes from New Zealand. Other materials are white and gold mother of pearl, all of which come from various shell food industrial byproducts. I have fairly strong opinions about using any materials from endangers species or CITES appendix sources - mine are not. I buy most of my pearl from Andy DePaul at

    http://luthiersupply.com/home.html

    The purfling on the parlor guitars is a laminated material - again, I can buy that from Andy or places like StewMac. This is not the flexible stuff that you see on some lutherie sites. If you are curious about inlay I will be doing some on this guitar and if you want specifics on Style 42 purfling (like the parlors) I can provide that.

    Here are little piece of the purfling being fitted into the channel - I can show you the other tricks but then I'd have to shoot you

    [​IMG]

    ps - I once read somewhere that the pearl inlay on a style 42 guitar double the hand labor. Seems about right
     
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  17. Freeman Keller

    Freeman Keller Tele-Meister

    Age:
    73
    121
    Aug 22, 2018
    Washington
    Actually that little discussion about abalone purfling kind of segues into today's progress. If you remember back a few posts I talked about my thinking process with I build, particularly the idea that the wood dictates the "theme" of the guitar. The Spanish cedar has two major components - the warm amber to redish brown that seems to match well with the mahogany, and the darker brown flame and figure. I decided to use a rosewood fretboard which I think will match to the darker brown, and from there its pretty simple to decide that all the other trim should also be rose. There is only one minor problem with all of this, I have bent a lot of wood binding (the parlor above is also rosewood) but I have never bent anything as tight as the horn on this. My other Lester was bound in cream plastic, that is dead easy to bend with a little heat from a heat gun, this might be more of a problem.

    So, I made a bending jig out of some scrap MDF - basically cut the shape of half of the guitar and routed a channel in it. I kept the "outside" piece to help in clamping the binding in the jig. Fired up the old hot pipe, wrapped a wet rag around it and started heating the binding strip

    [​IMG]

    Kept working the strip into the jig, a little more heat, a little more bending, clamping it as I progressed

    [​IMG]

    Finally put the outie in place, clamped it all nice and tight and let it cool while I went for a bike ride.

    [​IMG]
     
    awasson likes this.

  18. Freeman Keller

    Freeman Keller Tele-Meister

    Age:
    73
    121
    Aug 22, 2018
    Washington
    Later in the day when I took it out of the mold, bingo!

    [​IMG]

    Again, most of the time with fairly gentle curves its pretty easy to tape the binding into the channel, in this case I had to use a few clamps

    [​IMG]

    Basically what I do is get it tight in the channel, then put a tiny drop of water thin CA glue right on the interface between binding and body. The CA wicks into the seam and holds the binding in place. Sometimes I have to hold a spot and hit it with a little accelerator. When I am done the bind is "tacked" in place, I can go back and wick more CA from both the top and side. Pull the tape and clamps off and glue those sections. Here is the bass side, much easier without the cutaway

    [​IMG]

    There was a tiny bit of splitting in very point of the horn but I was able to push that back in place and hold it with the CA.

    Whew
     
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  19. Macrogats

    Macrogats Tele-Afflicted

    Age:
    51
    May 15, 2017
    Auckland, New Zealand
    Incredible work dude!!
     

  20. boredguy6060

    boredguy6060 Friend of Leo's

    Mar 28, 2012
    Sou Cal
    I see that your way is legit.
    The reason for my curiosity is I have a 000 Blueridge that it said was inlaid with abalone D45 style.
    In fact it is overlaid with Abalam. I always wondered why they would have such a thick clear coat. I’m sure that burying that Abalam which is like a tape took a lot of clear.
    That same guitar desperately needs a neck reset and fret work, but the only guy I know that can do a proper reset and set up, doesn’t want to do it because it would destroy the overlay.
    That’s what drove my curiosity about your inlay work, but as I said, your way is legit inlay.
    And you’re right, doing any shell inlay work would certainly double the hand work, but it makes a statement like nothing else. Before I lost about 80% of my vision, I had seriously thought about doing Shell inlay work.
    Good luck, and keep turning out those amazing guitars.
     

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