Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com
Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com
Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com

6 metres of sumfink

Discussion in 'Tele Home Depot' started by Mat UK, Dec 18, 2016.

  1. Mat UK

    Mat UK Tele-Afflicted

    Feb 17, 2009
    London, UK
    And I've chopped up my wood. It's sitting for a week or two to relllllaxxxxxxxxx

    Poplar
    IMG_1424.JPG

    Maple
    IMG_1439.JPG
     
    Barncaster, DrASATele and richa like this.

  2. MM73

    MM73 Tele-Afflicted

    Age:
    44
    Feb 24, 2015
    South Lyon, MI
    Great start - those templates look perfect.

    I'm curious if everything will look as nicely organized in 3 months?
     

  3. Mat UK

    Mat UK Tele-Afflicted

    Feb 17, 2009
    London, UK
    Ummm... by nicely organised do you mean me nicely organising these pieces of wood into a fully constructed guitar... I can't promise that!

    The truth is my work-to-life balance doesn't give me a huge amount of practical time to work on these projects, so I spend a lot of time thinking and planning about what I'm going to do, and organising what little I have done into something photo-worthy... I guess a work-to-life-to-luthiery balance is more accurate!
     
    MM73 likes this.

  4. Mat UK

    Mat UK Tele-Afflicted

    Feb 17, 2009
    London, UK
    Todays progress: Thicknessed 4 out of 6 poplar body pieces using my newly created router sled. If you're interested how I made it, see here:

    http://www.tdpri.com/threads/another-router-sled.730417/


    It worked a treat.

    It was also my first outing with the Triton router. It's a beauty (in my limited experienced of routers); the fine adjustment is very useful; it's super quiet in comparison to my Bosch palm router and the speed adjustment is brilliant.

    IMG_1459.JPG


    IMG_1461.JPG

    There was corner to my garage earlier... crikey I produced a lot of chips

    IMG_1462.JPG
     
    Barncaster likes this.

  5. Mat UK

    Mat UK Tele-Afflicted

    Feb 17, 2009
    London, UK
    Here are the pieces ready for the jointing stage 44mm and 46mm deep respectively. They are both generously sizes for a telecaster. One of them could just about squeeze on an offset - but i'll save the remaining pieces for that.

    Not a massive fan of poplar, but they will end up with opaque finished, so no biggy

    IMG_1468.JPG IMG_1470.JPG
     

  6. Reckless Rat

    Reckless Rat Tele-Meister

    414
    Feb 26, 2014
    UK
    Triton owners of the UK, represent!

    I have the slightly larger MOF001 and it lives almost exclusively in my router table. I bought both collets (1/2" and 1/4") and find it a great tool, but personally I prefer to use the smaller Bosch GKF600 for hand-held operations like pickup routes and neck pockets as it's more controllable.

    That's also an impressively-engineered router sled. Mine is a lot more Heath Robinson, but yes, you can make an incredible mess very quickly! I found that you can get formica kitchen worktop offcuts from the Big Orange Sheds for about a fiver, so I used that in the hope that it might be more stable than MDF. And I just screw the wood directly to it - once I've made too many holes, I'll chuck it away and get another bit :D

    Is that huuuuuuge knot hole going to give you any problems in the second tele? It seems to have split a little, too.
     

  7. Mat UK

    Mat UK Tele-Afflicted

    Feb 17, 2009
    London, UK
    Ha, it's great to know the brand gets the thumbs up. I debated whether the lower powered Triton would be powerful enough for the table and whether because it's my second I should go bigger - but I couldn't justify the cost! I'm very pleased so far though, I haven't used it in the table yet though.

    I think the GFK600 is great too, my only gripe - and it's probably only a glitch with mine - is that when the router is clamped in the standard base the clamping pressure pulls the bit out of true, I've had to use a couple of 1.5mm washers under two of the base screws to tip it back to true and tape for fine adjustment - before I fudged it all my routes where slanted, I just assumed out of the box it would be set up square

    The knot isn't as bad as it seems in the picture, although it does go all the way through. The blank will be about 480mm wide once glued up so it gives plenty space to dodge around it.

    IMG_1470g.jpg
     

  8. tewiq

    tewiq Tele-Meister Ad Free Member

    185
    Jul 27, 2010
    Granby Qc. Canada
    Knots just add character like.... (naughty pine) :rolleyes:
     

  9. Mat UK

    Mat UK Tele-Afflicted

    Feb 17, 2009
    London, UK
    Ha, I don't like my guitars to have character... well, not that kind of character
     
    tewiq likes this.

  10. Mat UK

    Mat UK Tele-Afflicted

    Feb 17, 2009
    London, UK
    I just reread and missed your tip for worktops. I'm googling Big Orange Sheds with no luck... is it a kitchen supplier?
     

  11. tewiq

    tewiq Tele-Meister Ad Free Member

    185
    Jul 27, 2010
    Granby Qc. Canada
    Knots make your instrument unique and distinguishable, more so if it's in front unlike mine[​IMG] IMG_1799.JPG
     
    Mat UK likes this.

  12. Mat UK

    Mat UK Tele-Afflicted

    Feb 17, 2009
    London, UK
    *Essay begins*

    This morning hasn't been great, not bad, but not great. It's been my first foray into jointing on my table router (actually first time using my table router full stop). I went for the straight edge and bearing bit approach... things I learned:

    1. Masking tape and superglue works fine for sticking down templates, sandpaper etc; not so for holding a straight edge down. It feels secure, doesn't appear so move but on inspection after the cut there is a fraction of deflection.

    2. Clamp the router in place after adjustment! I've read here people warning against such a simple oversight... it happened to me and embarrassingly took me a while to realise... the bit slowly worked its way down on by a few mm but a few mm too much!

    3. A long bearing bit is all well and good but when you're running it against a 4mm thick steel ruler there isn't much surface to run it across especially when taking into account the 1-2mm of space between the bearing and cutter start. This meant my cuts had an untouched ledge where the cutter couldn't reach without the bearing loosing contact... if that makes sense

    4. Vibration ruins my table insert height adjustment. The router plate is height adjusted with 4 corner grub screws to align it with the table surface. The vibration from the router caused the grub screws to move causing the insert to drop. This meant the piece kept catching and I had to keep stopping and readjusting

    5. Run your narrow bits at the highest speed. Initially out of caution I ran this 1/2" bit at medium speed, I quickly realised this just caused chatter so I cranked it up to maximum. Not really a problem just a learning curve

    Therefore, im dumping the idea of using a straight edge as a guide, it clearly works for some people but not for me. I'm going to attempt the fence adjustment approach - I just need to find something thin and uniform to shim one half forward and possibly buy a straight or spiral bit...

    Essay over. Questions begin.

    Does anyone have any suggestions for a decent shimming material for the fence?

    Any thoughts on the plate height adjustment

    And to top of the morning, after being told I didn't need to come in to work today, they've now turned around and said that actually I do... off to work I go

    IMG_1471.JPG

    IMG_1472.JPG
     

  13. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

    Mar 30, 2003
    Ontario County
    Can't you just make or use a thicker guide instead of the metal straightedge thing? FWIW, I had the same problem with the table insert adjustment screws on the Grizzly. Most of the parts are inferior on the thing. I addressed that in some other thread. I replaced the table insert with a router lift I had here. Make sure the fence clamp knobs are tight too....really tight....tight isn't tight enough to keep it from sliding....
     
    Last edited: Jun 5, 2017
    Mat UK likes this.

  14. Mat UK

    Mat UK Tele-Afflicted

    Feb 17, 2009
    London, UK
    Embarrassingly, I thought I was being really clever buying an engineers straight edge, £30ish, it has two ground edges, one super accurate but bevelled to a sharp point, and the other edge square... I would buy another, but might see if I can get around it with using the fence. Also gluing/sticking the rule down each time I want to make a pass is annoying - using the fence setup would mean I can make quicker passes.

    I think i'll try and shim the plate up with some washers or something... there are a couple of magnets that keep it pulled down, hopefully that will suffice!

    And i'll be sure to get those knobs good and tight - I'm never too sure where the limit is with plastic.
     

  15. Reckless Rat

    Reckless Rat Tele-Meister

    414
    Feb 26, 2014
    UK
    Another good thing about Triton is that they actually sell spares. I had an armature problem with mine, but rather than toss the whole thing and buy a new one, I could simply dismantle it and fit a new one. Minus points for the armature failure I suppose (after 2+ years), but major plus points for being able to fix it.

    I'm surprised your Bosch is that far out - you've got me thinking I should check mine, but I think I would have noticed by now. Very strange. Anyway, the important bit is that your blank will be fine.

    Sorry, bad habit - I was referring to a popular DIY chain with hideous architecture and colouring, i.e. B&Q. If they have a wood cutting station at the back of the store, I have often found lengths of worktop or perfectly serviceable MDF in their offcuts bin for a few quid. Obviously, you can't guarantee that they have anything, but if you keep an eye out you can snag some very useful stuff. Think of it as a slightly higher quality of skip-diving! :D
     

  16. Reckless Rat

    Reckless Rat Tele-Meister

    414
    Feb 26, 2014
    UK
    Nothing went flying across the room, so I'd call that a pretty good first crack at the router table!

    A few thoughts:

    Yes, clamping the height is a must! You generally only forget once, depending on how expensive the wood is you're working on.

    The straightedge thing is a good way to get straight lines - assuming it doesn't move. I use double-sided tape, pressed down very firmly immediately before use. One thing to mind is that you can trim a little off the face of your straightedge if the cutter is high enough and the surface that it's sitting on isn't perfectly flat/parallel to the table top. Expensive if you're using a £30 ruler!

    Height adjustment screws - the releaseable kind of thread lock? What do they go into? I am a little suspicious of those phenolic table inserts, too. If you leave the router in there for long enough, they'll probably start to bow under the weight. Has anyone seen this? I use a piece of 6mm aluminium, instead.

    Not too sure about table shims. I made a 1-piece fence, and the few times I have tried to joint this way, I put 4-5 layers of masking tape on the outfeed side, pressed down very well, then lined up my fence so that the tip of the cutter at its maximum point is level with the outfeed. Very Heath Robinson, probably a crap way of doing it, but it seemed to work pretty well. As you have a much more Gucci table and fence there's probably a much better way of doing it.
     

  17. Mat UK

    Mat UK Tele-Afflicted

    Feb 17, 2009
    London, UK
    Ha, B&Q - that makes sense, it's obvious now. Google did bring up a result of a diy store in Australia, Perth called Big Orange Sheds - a long way to go for a worktop cutoff!

    I'll take a snap of the Bosch base - it's baffling really - I guess I should have complained at the time of noticing it.
     

  18. MM73

    MM73 Tele-Afflicted

    Age:
    44
    Feb 24, 2015
    South Lyon, MI
    Good luck! I'm very keen on how this gets sorted out. I don't have a jointer, and think the router is a good idea. I'd like to get away from purchasing prepared blanks...and the shipping.

    Work calling to tell you that you don't need to come in; then calling to tell you that you do need to come in... Well, that makes for an unpleasant start to a Monday!
     
    Mat UK likes this.

  19. Mat UK

    Mat UK Tele-Afflicted

    Feb 17, 2009
    London, UK
    I have a real adversion to double sided tape... too many scars from usin it on my first build, breaking templates, scraping the remains of stubborn tape and residue. I'll have a crack at the fence feed thingy and see how that goes - I may well end up revisiting my expensive straight edge again!

    This is how the plate sits in the table:

    IMG_1477.PNG
    There are four threaded insert points in each corner with Allen adjustable grub screws in them; the table has magnets dropped into holes in the corresponding corners; the plate sits on top of these th grub screws being attracted to the magnets; you then turn the screws to adjust the height of the plate relative to the table surface. It's a nice system until vibration cocks it all up. I'm thinking of using a couple of washers on the magnets to lift it up and maybe some little paper circles for finer adjustment.

    Gucci table - I didn't realise I'd purchased a fashion item! I've read about the masking tape approach, I was wondering if I could do that in between the MDF face and the aluminium fence. Alternatively, I've read about people using credit card type things to shim it, they are approx 1mm - is that too much/little for a jointing pass?
     

  20. Mat UK

    Mat UK Tele-Afflicted

    Feb 17, 2009
    London, UK
    All I want is a clean, straight joint...:(

    This mornings task was setting up the shimmed fence. It turns out the two fence halves arent perfectly (humanly perfectly) aligned to each so dropping in two business card sized shims wasn't going to be the simple solution I had hoped. Instead it was with a combination of paper shims and the business cards that eventually got the outfeed aligned...

    I ran a test piece then moved onto the blanks - it didn't turn out as well as I had hoped and through a bit of jiggery pokery eventually came to something that was close to being a straight edge - but as we all know close isnt even close to being good enough.

    So here's tomorrow mornings approach:

    - I've decided the business cards are too thick (1.5mm cuts) and is making the cut too cumbersome, on an area which resembled the ghost of a knot it bit aggressively and cut a groove. So I'm going to try and think of some thinner shims, maybe paper is fine...

    - I'm starting to wonder if a length of aluminium angle, tactically screwed to the pieces and then bearing routed would be better - although I don't know how true aluminium angle is

    Also. I used washers to adjust the insert height, it was a touch more stable.

    I see know what Marty meant when he said these tables are made of substandard parts
     

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