Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com
Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com
Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com

´60s finishes / grainfillers -what did Leo use ?

Discussion in 'Finely Finished' started by neuroy, Jan 21, 2011.

  1. neuroy

    neuroy TDPRI Member

    9
    Jun 22, 2010
    germany
    Had the grain filler on , let´s say early sixties Teles, been a kind of PU material or what was it based on ? Isn´t it a harder and thicker coat than the final laquer coat ?
    What was used / how had the wood been treated ?

    I´d like to refinish a ´67 Tele...

    Thank you all.
     

  2. ThaLowEndTheory

    ThaLowEndTheory Tele-Meister

    351
    Mar 11, 2009
    Valley Ranch,Texas
    Fullerplast I believe. Clear substance harder than lacquer. Not sure how much thicker. Curtis Novak says he uses polycrylic to replicate fullerplast. Some guys like it, some don't.
     

  3. ron jeffreys

    ron jeffreys Tele-Meister

    219
    Mar 20, 2006
    huntsville al
    Fuller Obrian

    Fullerplast was a liquid Plastic substance invented by Fuller Obrien That's where the name Fullerplast came from.Check it out.Nitro was the cheapest top coat Leo could find at the time.So actually the guitars were bound and sealed in plastic then lacquered over.They were painted one day buffed assembled and shipped the next day or two unless there were extra sunburst bodies which they would store to spray the custom colors over when one was ordered.There has been MUCH hype about lacquer and the tonal properties and so forth????? This was all explained to me by Bill Carson several years ago.He always laughed about all the steps people go through trying to duplicate an early Fender finish.Sand em seal em paint em buff em and ship em all in 2 or 3 days.
     

  4. Silverface

    Silverface Poster Extraordinaire Ad Free Member

    Age:
    65
    Mar 2, 2003
    Lawndale CA
    There is a big difference between the products used then and now though.

    Because of several progressive changes in air quality regulations lacquer formulations have been changed, and are now much slower "curing" than they were in the 50's...or 60's. Changes started in the 60's and were one of the reasons for the shift to polyesters.

    Note I didn't say "slower drying". The dry-to-touch time is actually very close. But the time to cure to full hardness if much longer, and becomes very sensitive to film thickness - the more coating, the slower the cure. This is why it can take 6 weeks or ski for a lacquer-coated instrument to cure enough to be cased without finish damage.
     

  5. Kennedycaster

    Kennedycaster Tele-Afflicted

    Apr 5, 2009
    Mesa, AZ
    Maybe its a regional thing with state environmental laws dictating the available products, but this is not my experience at all here in AZ. I can spray a guitar one day & wetsand/polish the next & put it in the case. With no immediate or long term damage. I've done it numerous times. (Granted, I don't pile on 6 cans of clear. Usually about 18-24ozs. of products total.) Myself & every other finishing professional I know does the same with furniture. I spray a table one day, ship it the next. Time is money. In fact, the instructions on the side of a can of Mohawk Classic Instrument Lacquer state "let dry for 2-3 days, then wetsand & buff". Even faster with their pre-catalyzed lacquers. Not once have I had the finish fail or imprint when using commercial lacquers. Same with repairs. I do allot of in-home repairs & I use aerosol sealer, toner & lacquer for repairs. After the repair, the piece is put back into service with no issues. With bulk lacquers & sealers, I use a flash retarder for proper drying. I have seen issues happen with consumer grade lacquer, Deft especially.
    People that are finishing their guitars are making mountains out of mole hills. It's not that hard. I think ReRanch has done a real dis-service with their overly-complicated finishing guide. It'll put the fear of god into first timers. But I get it, they're trying to sell their product. Same with StewMac. People should be reading books on furniture finishing instead.

    Bob
     

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