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-   -   Is Bakelite Hazardous? (http://www.tdpri.com/forum/telecaster-discussion-forum/314659-bakelite-hazardous.html)

Jazzerstang February 21st, 2012 04:40 PM

Is Bakelite Hazardous?
 
you may remember my thread about my 'winter' telecaster. I recently got a raw bakelite pickguard for it off ebay and it works really well, however, I did not put any finish on it. I have heard that bakelite is traditionally made made with formaldehyde and sometimes asbestos. Perhaps somebody here can school me on if these pickguards are in fact made with hazardous materials.

http://i1217.photobucket.com/albums/.../bakelite1.jpg

mellecaster February 21st, 2012 04:44 PM

If they were, I'd be Dead by now.....that's all I got.

Jazzerstang February 21st, 2012 04:45 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mellecaster (Post 3950321)
If they were, I'd be Dead by now.....that's all I got.

hahahaha!

Sparky472 February 21st, 2012 04:57 PM

Yes, it is made with hazardous materials but playing a guitar with a Bakelite pick guard isn't hazardous. Manufacturing it is hazardous, which is at least one reason why it lost its popularity. If you are going to be cutting it or drilling it, wear a dust mask. Otherwise, there isn't anything to worry about.

LeroyBlues February 21st, 2012 05:02 PM

Only if you plan on eating it.

jkingma February 21st, 2012 05:11 PM

Wiping your arse with it could be hazardous. So don't do that.

nickhofen February 21st, 2012 05:22 PM

The dangerous nature of Bakelite is from different sources: manufacturing, collecting and disposing.

Since Bakelite is a manufactured, synthetic plastic containing incredible amounts of formaldehyde, asbestos and other extremely toxic polymers, those who produced these desirable products, put themselves at risk. At the time, safety and health precautions were not mandatory. These hardworking men and women exposed themselves to the toxins, through exposure.

Furthermore, though it seems a benign pastime, collecting Bakelite products also do pose a heath threat. If a Bakelite product breaks, the synthetic materials become airborne, and may result in inhalation, ingestion or direct skin contact. Bakelite collectibles are beautiful but deadly.

Just like any other plastic-based product, disposing Bakelite is extremely hazardous to the environment. With older home renovations at its peak, many people are unintentionally exposed to Bakelite from replacing ceiling or floor tiles. Even more, collectors are also susceptible to exposure especially if a dish or a bracelet is broken.

Besides the obvious danger to the environment to improper disposal of these products, there is a considerable and lingering health risk. Not only did these products contain formaldehyde, Bakelite contained asbestos, a known and hazardous toxin. Exposure to Bakelite dust may cause lung infections, mesothelioma and other respiratory complications. Though medical care for these conditions, including mesothelioma treatments, are improving through breakthroughs, there is still an on-going risk; not only for those who manufactured those products but also for those who own them.

Disposing these materials safely is critical. Many facilities carefully dispose of Bakelite products in a manner that is not hazardous to human or environmental health. To find a plastic recycling center near you, check out Earth911. This is how we can all do our part in cleaning up these harmful plastics and in turn, making our environment a better place. Find ways to substitute harmful plastics out of your daily routine. But if you must use them, dispose of them safely and cleanly.

notdave February 21st, 2012 05:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by nickhofen (Post 3950402)
The dangerous nature of Bakelite is from different sources: manufacturing, collecting and disposing.

Since Bakelite is a manufactured, synthetic plastic containing incredible amounts of formaldehyde, asbestos and other extremely toxic polymers, those who produced these desirable products, put themselves at risk. At the time, safety and health precautions were not mandatory. These hardworking men and women exposed themselves to the toxins, through exposure.

Furthermore, though it seems a benign pastime, collecting Bakelite products also do pose a heath threat. If a Bakelite product breaks, the synthetic materials become airborne, and may result in inhalation, ingestion or direct skin contact. Bakelite collectibles are beautiful but deadly.

Just like any other plastic-based product, disposing Bakelite is extremely hazardous to the environment. With older home renovations at its peak, many people are unintentionally exposed to Bakelite from replacing ceiling or floor tiles. Even more, collectors are also susceptible to exposure especially if a dish or a bracelet is broken.

Besides the obvious danger to the environment to improper disposal of these products, there is a considerable and lingering health risk. Not only did these products contain formaldehyde, Bakelite contained asbestos, a known and hazardous toxin. Exposure to Bakelite dust may cause lung infections, mesothelioma and other respiratory complications. Though medical care for these conditions, including mesothelioma treatments, are improving through breakthroughs, there is still an on-going risk; not only for those who manufactured those products but also for those who own them.

Disposing these materials safely is critical. Many facilities carefully dispose of Bakelite products in a manner that is not hazardous to human or environmental health. To find a plastic recycling center near you, check out Earth911. This is how we can all do our part in cleaning up these harmful plastics and in turn, making our environment a better place. Find ways to substitute harmful plastics out of your daily routine. But if you must use them, dispose of them safely and cleanly.

Nice C'n'P

It is usual to credit the source though.

http://www.sunnyray.org/Toxic-plastics-bakelite.htm



:wink:

nickhofen February 21st, 2012 05:32 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by nickhofen (Post 3950402)
The dangerous nature of Bakelite is from different sources: manufacturing, collecting and disposing.

Since Bakelite is a manufactured, synthetic plastic containing incredible amounts of formaldehyde, asbestos and other extremely toxic polymers, those who produced these desirable products, put themselves at risk. At the time, safety and health precautions were not mandatory. These hardworking men and women exposed themselves to the toxins, through exposure.

Furthermore, though it seems a benign pastime, collecting Bakelite products also do pose a heath threat. If a Bakelite product breaks, the synthetic materials become airborne, and may result in inhalation, ingestion or direct skin contact. Bakelite collectibles are beautiful but deadly.

Just like any other plastic-based product, disposing Bakelite is extremely hazardous to the environment. With older home renovations at its peak, many people are unintentionally exposed to Bakelite from replacing ceiling or floor tiles. Even more, collectors are also susceptible to exposure especially if a dish or a bracelet is broken.

Besides the obvious danger to the environment to improper disposal of these products, there is a considerable and lingering health risk. Not only did these products contain formaldehyde, Bakelite contained asbestos, a known and hazardous toxin. Exposure to Bakelite dust may cause lung infections, mesothelioma and other respiratory complications. Though medical care for these conditions, including mesothelioma treatments, are improving through breakthroughs, there is still an on-going risk; not only for those who manufactured those products but also for those who own them.

Disposing these materials safely is critical. Many facilities carefully dispose of Bakelite products in a manner that is not hazardous to human or environmental health. To find a plastic recycling center near you, check out Earth911. This is how we can all do our part in cleaning up these harmful plastics and in turn, making our environment a better place. Find ways to substitute harmful plastics out of your daily routine. But if you must use them, dispose of them safely and cleanly.

Also...For other uses, see Asbestos (disambiguation).


Asbestos (pronounced /ęsˈbɛstəs/ or /ęzˈbɛstəs/) is a set of six naturally occurring silicate minerals used commercially for their desirable physical properties.[1] They all have in common their eponymous, asbestiform habit: long, (1:20) thin fibrous crystals. The inhalation of asbestos fibers can cause serious illnesses, including malignant lung cancer, mesothelioma (a formerly rare cancer strongly associated with exposure to amphibole asbestos), and asbestosis (a type of pneumoconiosis). Long exposure to high concentrations of asbestos fibers is more likely to cause health problems.This is most common among the miners of asbestos, since they have the longest exposure to it. The European Union has banned all use of asbestos[2] and extraction, manufacture and processing of asbestos products.[3]
Asbestos became increasingly popular among manufacturers and builders in the late 19th century because of its sound absorption, average tensile strength, its resistance to fire, heat, electrical and chemical damage, and affordability. It was used in such applications as electrical insulation for hotplate wiring and in building insulation. When asbestos is used for its resistance to fire or heat, the fibers are often mixed with cement (resulting in fiber cement) or woven into fabric or mats. Commercial asbestos mining began in the Eastern Townships of Quebec, Canada and the world's largest asbestos mine is located in the town of Asbestos, Quebec.
Here you go....http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asbestos

chipbutty24 February 21st, 2012 05:41 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by notdave (Post 3950412)
Nice C'n'P

It is usual to credit the source though.

http://www.sunnyray.org/Toxic-plastics-bakelite.htm



:wink:

I nearly spit coffee all over my monitor!! Reminds of my grade school librarian.

Jazzerstang February 21st, 2012 06:00 PM

alright, so, how do I finish it to keep in the toxins?

I don't want to spend too much.

3 Chord February 21st, 2012 06:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jazzerstang (Post 3950489)
alright, so, how do I finish it to keep in the toxins?

I don't want to spend too much.

Don't light it on fire when you play Jimi music. Seriously, I would worry more about using a cell phone than what will "fume off" of your pickgaurd with normal use.

If you are shaping (grinding) your pickgaurd, well any small particulates are bad for your lungs, not just bakelite and or asbestoes. Wear a respirator if you must but don't be affraid, be informed!

Batman February 21st, 2012 06:12 PM

Encase it in concrete? :lol:

Jazzerstang February 21st, 2012 06:18 PM

thanks.

slack February 21st, 2012 06:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by chipbutty24 (Post 3950443)
I nearly spit coffee all over my monitor!! Reminds of my grade school librarian.

Really? Made me want to pat notdave on the back.

Skub February 21st, 2012 06:44 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by slack (Post 3950584)
Really? Made me want to pat notdave on the back.

Risky,you'll get barbs in your hand. :shock:

Ronkirn February 21st, 2012 06:47 PM

Typically when you purchase a product that has a substantial "hazard factor" from a commercial industrial supplier, they are required to supply the government approved warnings.... i have bought this stuff from many industrial suppliers...with never a "peep" about gettin' kilt or blowin' up the planet.... not even once,

ron Kirn

Sw0rdfish February 21st, 2012 06:58 PM

100 people on average get kilt a year by the deadly Arachis hypogaea. Which is prlly more likely unless you snack on your plastics. Just givin ya some guff aka Internet sarcasms

tap4154 February 21st, 2012 07:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jazzerstang (Post 3950489)
alright, so, how do I finish it to keep in the toxins?

I don't want to spend too much.

Some Deft nitro in the blue spray can will do it. Just makes it look better, no reason to worry about toxins attacking you. But wear a mask when spraying it :wink:

jefrs February 21st, 2012 07:21 PM

Bakelite is a thermosetting phenol formaldehyde resin with a wood flour filler.

It does not contain asbestos. It is made from formaldehyde but it is not formaldehyde itself, it is now a different chemical. Look it up. It was invented 1907 by Leo Baekeland. There is lots of information out there.

Bakelite is usually brown, but can be dyed during manufacture.

Tufnol and Paxolin are similar materials but with a paper or cloth laminate for structural strength.


If you want to worry about using something really hazardous, then worry about unleaded petrol or diesel fuel.


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