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Old April 4th, 2003, 11:04 AM   #1 (permalink)
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sawdust filler glue stuff recipe

Hello and thanks for reading, always fun to be here.
I have a free strat body that has a Floyd Rose rout (boo hiss).
After much deliberation I have decided to try and fill it myself. Sounds like a fune project. Does anyone have resources on how to do this?

Any input is much obliged. Keep twangin'!

Richie

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Old April 4th, 2003, 11:55 AM   #2 (permalink)
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What are you wanting to do?

Do you want to make it a hard-tail? That would be a job...

It would be helpful to know how your body is currently routed. Is it routed for a recessed Floyd? Was it drilled for bushings/studs, or wood-screw pivot posts? Does it have the (smaller) Original Floyd Rose routing pattern, or the larger pattern for a Floyd Pro? If it didn't have a real Floyd on there, it's hard to tell how it was routed....

Assuming that it was routed for an original Floyd, and you want to put a vintage trem on there, you could probably get by simply dowelling the pivot post holes and touching up the paint. The top rout for a Floyd isn't a whole lot bigger than the rout for a traditional strat trem. I've never tried it, but I'd say the vintage trem would just about cover the rout -- perhaps a bit of open space there....

There was likely some "extra" wood removed in the back cavity, as well, but that should affect anything -- other than sustain, LOL!

Have you considered simply using one of the non-fine-tuning Floyds? There are several on eBay right now -- people are passing them off as really early models, when, in fact, the non-tuning models were used for quite some time on the Striker series Kramers.... Anyway, a non-tuning Floyd, a properly cut nut, and a set of locking tuners can make an excellent alternative to a vintage trem. I wouldn't recommend it in most instances, but since your guitar has already been "hacked," it might be an easier alternative....

BTW, I love Floyds. I wouldn't cut up a nice strat for one, but I have a couple of guitars with them on there. As a matter of fact, I just bought a new one to replace the horribly rusted on my old Kramer Pacer....
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Old April 4th, 2003, 02:21 PM   #3 (permalink)
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hmmm.

A hardtail would be cool. I was dreaming that I might figure out how to slap a bigsby on there. Has it been done? Otherwise a hardtail would be nice.

As for the rout- it is a recessed floyd for the fernandez version. The model number on the body is LE-2 (X maybe).

Again, this is a project to experiment with. I may wind up w/ p 90s and the bigsby!!!!

I do plan on completely stripping the paint (btw- sand or thinner?) and just Steve Austin-ing the thing.
Robo-strat. May even chrome or gold plate the body.
eeewwww.

So, I think the thing to do would be to cram as much sawdust/bondo or whatever in there and have a tabula rasa.

Still looking for that recipe ie: really fine dust, can I buy that (only have what the chain spits out from my fire wood).

Okay.
That's enough for now.

Ricardo
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Old April 4th, 2003, 02:35 PM   #4 (permalink)
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If you want to go that route...

Skip the filler mix and cut some poplar or alder pieces and glue them in. That's probably to big an area to use only filler on...

After you glue the blanks in, then you can put bondo or wood filler -- I think bondo is best for what you're doing -- over it to smooth it out...

If you get a really solid fit in the block cavity with a new piece of wood, I see no reason that you couldn't make it a hardtail...

Again, I think this project will likely be more effort than it's worth, but I've done some of those, myself....

Good luck...
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Old April 4th, 2003, 02:50 PM   #5 (permalink)
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I hear that,

But it is a way to learn more about the process without ruining a guitar that is worth something.

I think breaking guitars is fun.

Any thoughts on the bigsby?

Thanks alot for you help.
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Old April 4th, 2003, 03:39 PM   #6 (permalink)
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Sorry -- forgot about the bigsby....

I suppose that putting a Bigsby on might actually be best, as the strings would be anchored to the (still solid) top....

I suppose you'd have to put a tune-o-matic bridge on there, or maybe a jaguar bridge....
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