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Old June 15th, 2013, 03:44 AM   #1 (permalink)
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Question about sheet music

On a piece of sheet music I was looking at (it was the Ya Ya's version of Stray Cat Blues) and at the beginning during the part that has the rhythm that goes D C G F it said "hold throughout". I have seen "let ring throughout" and I know what this means but I have never seen "hold throughout" before so what does this mean? Please explain...

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Old June 15th, 2013, 07:40 AM   #2 (permalink)
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I bet it means the same thing - let the chord continue to sound as opposed to playing sock chord style, choking them off, unless there is a note or couple of notes you can hold down throughout the whole time, which I have a hard time imagining.
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Old June 15th, 2013, 07:48 AM   #3 (permalink)
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It might mean to keep playing the same kind of accent on the notes/chords throughout the section.

It could very well mean to just let the chords ring out as you play, too.

I'd have to see the music to get some context and pull out a better translation.
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Old June 15th, 2013, 11:11 PM   #4 (permalink)
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I think it means you're building that chord over and over-- play the D, play the C while the D still sounds, play the G while the first two still sound, et cetera. Very common on keyboards.
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Old June 16th, 2013, 12:10 AM   #5 (permalink)
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Are they strummed chords or are they arpeggios? Without looking at the music and not knowing that song, I would take that as hold the chord until you start the next chord. If they are arpeggios I would assume they want the individual notes ring as long as you can. Even picking up notes on alternative strings when possible to let them ring even longer otherwise known as a harp style.
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Old June 16th, 2013, 04:46 PM   #6 (permalink)
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They are broken up chords so yeah they are arpeggios...hope that helps
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Old June 17th, 2013, 02:09 AM   #7 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nightatthehotel View Post
They are broken up chords so yeah they are arpeggios...hope that helps
Ok, yeah just let the individual notes ring as long as possible.
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Old June 17th, 2013, 03:12 AM   #8 (permalink)
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Thanks Lunchie!
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Old June 17th, 2013, 04:57 AM   #9 (permalink)
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Yep, that's what it means. With single note lines that's sometimes called campanella
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Old June 17th, 2013, 08:28 PM   #10 (permalink)
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A fermata (also known as a hold, pause, a birdseye or cyclops eye, or as a grand pause when placed on a note or a rest) is an element of classical musical notation indicating that the note should be sustained for longer than its note value would indicate. Exactly how much longer it is held is up to the discretion of the performer or conductor, but twice as long is not unusual. It is usually printed above, but occasionally below (upside down), the note that is to be held longer. Occasionally holds are also printed above rests or barlines, indicating a pause of indefinite duration.


by Definition: A fermata is an articulation mark that allows a note or chord to be held for as long as desired. A fermata may also be considered a tempo command.
A fermata is written upside down below the staff if it affects a lower plane of action or decay

If a fermata is written over a barline, there will be a pause between the measures.
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