Routing a hole for a Jazz Pickup, without a router. - Telecaster Guitar Forum
The Number 1 Fender Telecaster Guitar authority in the world.
   

Go Back   Telecaster Guitar Forum > Other Discussion Forums > The BASS Place
Forgot Username/Password? Join Us!
Notices

The BASS Place Talk about Bass guitars and the low end of the scale.


Wilde Pickups by Bill & Becky Lawrence WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Amps, Mods, Pedals dallenpickups.com Warmoth.com seymourduncan.com


Forum Jump


Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old December 19th, 2010, 01:09 AM   #1 (permalink)
Tele-Meister
 
guitarguytim's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Utah
Age: 33
Posts: 228
Routing a hole for a Jazz Pickup, without a router.

Well, I got my Christmas present early! My wife surprised me with a P-Bass kit by Saga (I'm in dire need of a bass since I sold mine a few months back). This is going to be my first build :)

Anyway, I'd like to add a Jazz pickup at the bridge, in addition to the split P-pickup.

Question #1 - Where exactly should I place the pickup? How far is a jazz pickup from the bridge on a jazz bass?

Question #2 - Once I have the placement figured out, what is the best way to route the hole without a router? As of right now I'm planning on building a template for the hole with MFD. Then I was planning on mounting that to the top of the bass as a guide. I'm going to use my drill to take out most of the wood, and then use a dremel to remove the rest - good idea or bad idea?

I'm planning on painting the bass Arctic White, so If I need to use wood filler it shouldn't be noticeable.

Thanks for any tips in advance!

__________________
Visit my music blog, it's random, but pretty awesome!
guitarguytim is offline   Reply With Quote

Old December 19th, 2010, 01:16 AM   #2 (permalink)
Friend of Leo's
 
Birdmankustomz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: New York
Age: 23
Posts: 2,643
I have a Saga P-bass, I love the thing, its beast. When I get on my laptop I'll post a pic, as for the Jazz pup I can't help, sorry.
__________________
That's just like, your opinion man...
Birdmankustomz is offline   Reply With Quote

Old December 19th, 2010, 01:21 PM   #3 (permalink)
Friend of Leo's
 
4string's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Central California
Age: 61
Posts: 2,287
I can give you the placement of the bridge pickup as it is on a '62 jazz bass. Fender moved it closer to the bridge in the late '60's. Let me know if interested.

I think you could use a Dremel with your outlined approach if you have the router base for it. An 1/8" dia end mill with a 3/4" cut length could work if you let the smooth shaft of the bit ride on a 1/4" thick template that is not plastic. You would need to be careful as a lot of heat is generated from a spinning shaft riding directly on a template.
4string is offline   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links   #
Sponsored posting
 

Old December 19th, 2010, 01:35 PM   #4 (permalink)
Super Moderator
Doctor of Teleocity
 
Tim Armstrong's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Austin, Texas
Age: 55
Posts: 19,213
I don't have a router, but I do have some nice sharp wood chisels (and plenty of practice using them). I'd think that would perhaps be a better way to go than drilling a bunch of holes. Here's the pickup in my bass "Hoss", in a hole I chiseled:



Tim
Tim Armstrong is online now   Reply With Quote

Old December 19th, 2010, 03:16 PM   #5 (permalink)
Friend of Leo's
 
Bolide's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Rocky Hill, CT
Posts: 4,926
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tim Armstrong View Post
I don't have a router, but I do have some nice sharp wood chisels (and plenty of practice using them). I'd think that would perhaps be a better way to go than drilling a bunch of holes. Here's the pickup in my bass "Hoss", in a hole I chiseled:


Tim
Concur.
You can get a good mortising chisel sharp and have the waste knocked out in a fraction of the time it would take to turn the waste into sawdust with a router, let alone a Dremel.

It takes a bit of knack to get the knock right, but the knock is a learnable knack.
Bolide is offline   Reply With Quote

Old December 19th, 2010, 03:41 PM   #6 (permalink)
Tele-Afflicted
 
Al Watsky's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: New Jersey
Age: 62
Posts: 1,575
Yes indeed. Chisel's work.
Practice on scrap first.
I worked with a fellow who liked the control offered by working with hand tools.
Before I had routers and templets I did many of my own guitars with chisel's and fostner bits. Works fine if you take it slow.
By the time I had started working on guitars I had all of the tool skills under control.
Sharpening and etc. , working with grain and cutting against and cross grain.
Most important . Lay out the job ! Measure twice cut once !
__________________
Livin' in the Past ,Present and Future
is takin' up all my time..........
Al Watsky is offline   Reply With Quote

Old December 21st, 2010, 12:04 PM   #7 (permalink)
Tele-Meister
 
guitarguytim's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Utah
Age: 33
Posts: 228
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tim Armstrong View Post
I don't have a router, but I do have some nice sharp wood chisels (and plenty of practice using them). I'd think that would perhaps be a better way to go than drilling a bunch of holes. Here's the pickup in my bass "Hoss", in a hole I chiseled:



Tim

Hey Tim, can you post a full picture of your tele bass, I'd love to see it

So chisels are the consensus huh... I've got a set on my tool bench, I hadn't even though of using them... How to you measure depth when using chisels? Do you just go slow and measure a lot?

Thanks,

-Tim
__________________
Visit my music blog, it's random, but pretty awesome!
guitarguytim is offline   Reply With Quote

Old December 21st, 2010, 12:08 PM   #8 (permalink)
Tele-Meister
 
guitarguytim's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Utah
Age: 33
Posts: 228
Also, I'm only planning on putting 3 knobs on my bass, 2 volumes and 1 tone (I used to have an Ibanez bass setup this way that I loved), but I could be persuaded to go 2 volumes and 2 tones (although right now that seems like overkill to me).

What are your thoughts, is one tone knob sufficient, or should I plan on adding a second one?
__________________
Visit my music blog, it's random, but pretty awesome!
guitarguytim is offline   Reply With Quote

Old December 21st, 2010, 01:14 PM   #9 (permalink)
Poster Extraordinaire
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Greenville, North Carolina
Age: 63
Posts: 7,116
Quote:
Originally Posted by guitarguytim View Post
...

So chisels are the consensus huh... I've got a set on my tool bench, I hadn't even though of using them... How to you measure depth when using chisels? Do you just go slow and measure a lot?

Thanks,

-Tim
Sounds like you are just starting out with chisels, so here's a few thoughts:

-Don't touch a chisel to that body until you can make an acceptable cavity in a piece of scrap wood.

-In the words of my 9th grade pattern shop teacher, "Keep your meat behind the blade."

-If you aren't set up to put a proper sharp edge on your chisels, set that up before you start. The sharper they are, the better (and safer) they are.

-You can use a combination square to check the depth. Just set the head at the proper distance from the end of the rule.

-There's actually nothing wrong with using a drill to hog out the center of the cavity, and just cleaning it up with the chisels.
__________________
Dim lights, thick smoke, and loud, loud music.
It's the only kind of life you'll ever understand.
Dim lights, thick smoke, and loud, loud music.
You'll never make a wife to a home lovin' man.
Ricky D. is offline   Reply With Quote

Old December 21st, 2010, 01:19 PM   #10 (permalink)
Friend of Leo's
 
Bolide's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Rocky Hill, CT
Posts: 4,926
I think two indispensible instruments anyone doing electric guitar should own are a basic multimeter, and a pair of student grade dial calipers, but depth measurements can be done with some confidence with just a scale, or better a combination square.

Practice is everything when mortising with chisels, but with practice you will develop a deal of confidence and "wood sense" that will enable you to get depths remarkably accurate with just a few passes. But for this job you nailed it with "go slow and measure often."
Bolide is offline   Reply With Quote

Old December 21st, 2010, 01:40 PM   #11 (permalink)
Tele-Meister
 
guitarguytim's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Utah
Age: 33
Posts: 228
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ricky D. View Post
-There's actually nothing wrong with using a drill to hog out the center of the cavity, and just cleaning it up with the chisels.
That was actually what I was thinking, I'll still use the drill, but then go with the chisels instead of the dremel for cleaning up.
__________________
Visit my music blog, it's random, but pretty awesome!
guitarguytim is offline   Reply With Quote

Old December 21st, 2010, 01:42 PM   #12 (permalink)
Tele-Meister
 
guitarguytim's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Utah
Age: 33
Posts: 228
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bolide View Post
But for this job you nailed it with "go slow and measure often."
I have a buddy who builds guitars, and he keeps telling me, "The slower you go, the less mistakes you'll make. And when you do make one, it'll be small and easy to fix."
__________________
Visit my music blog, it's random, but pretty awesome!
guitarguytim is offline   Reply With Quote

Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

Forum Jump


» Random Photo for Guests
Gibson Robot Guitar (Limited Edition: First Run)
Untitled Document



 


Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.2



IMPORTANT:Treat everyone here with respect, no matter how difficult! No sex, drug, political, religion or hate discussion permitted here.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0 RC 2
© TDPRI.COM 1999 - 2014 All rights reserved.