$vboptions[bbtitle]

Spray gun with a pancake compressor?

brandt
December 7th, 2007, 07:31 PM
I've been thinking about getting an inexpensive spray gun. Home Depot has the Husky brand. There is a little one for $29 and a bigger one for $49. But no one could tell me if it would work with my Porter Cable pancake compressor.

The guns are rated at 4.0 SCFM@40PSI and 7.0SCFM@40PSI respectively. I'm not really clear on how this stuff is rated. At first glance it doesn't look like I will get enough air to drive the spray guns.

Specs on my compressor
6 Gallon Pancake style, stable tank with water drain valve and rubber feet
150 PSI - Higher pressure for longer air tool performance
3.7 SCFM @ 40 PSI and 2.6 SCFM @ 90 PSI for fast recovery time

Does anyone know if this will work?

jaydawg
December 7th, 2007, 08:40 PM
Yup, you will be ok with your small compressor. It doesn't take much air to put a coat on a guitar. I would also go with the small jam gun that HD sells. It holds just enough material to spray one wet coat.

e-merlin
December 7th, 2007, 09:35 PM
Spray guns don't need a lot of pressure, but they do need a lot of volume. Your compressor at 3.7 cfm falls short of the gun with the lowest requirement, 4.0 cfm. You might run out of air in the middle of the project. It's going to take you a lot longer than a minute to paint a guitar.

brandt
December 8th, 2007, 12:31 AM
Would this work...? I could make a couple of passes with the spray gun. Pause a few seconds make another few passes, pause again and repeat. All the time the compressor would be keeping up the pressure and volume. Does that make sense or am missing how this might work.

Disclaimer, if I sound inexperienced its only because I AM! I've only used my compressor with a small brad nailer to build a few cabinets and the air nozzle to fill up tires and basketballs.

shades
December 8th, 2007, 06:55 AM
The volume of air supplied is more important than the pressure used by the paint gun. The delivered air of a single stage compressor will vary, try to get the best rated delivery at 90psi and you should have adequate useable air volume at the recommended pressure for the finishing product that you are using. There is a big difference between displaced cfm and delivered cfm of an air compressor.
Also keep in mind that the air nozzle,fluid cap and fluid needle setup of a paint gun will determine what air volumes can be used for various products.

:cool:

Tedecaster
December 8th, 2007, 11:08 AM
You can add one of those portable air tanks, inline, from your compressor to your gun. They are 4-10 gal, made for pumping up tires, etc. & are pretty easy to find cheap. Just make up a pipe "T" w/ couplers.

It will take your compressor longer to re-charge both tanks but it gives you more usable volume.

brandt
December 8th, 2007, 11:47 AM
Thanks guys, all great suggestions... I think I'll buy an inexpensive gun and try it out. The extra tank is a great idea!

spaghetti
December 9th, 2007, 12:13 AM
what tedecaster said! A 3 or 4 gallon slave tank will give you a more consistant air flow. Small compressors kick on and off a lot and it will always change your spray output and pattern.

Axis29
December 9th, 2007, 09:23 AM
PLEASE DON'T!

That little pancake compressor really isn't enough to supply a spray gun! Trust me on this, I own a number of different compressors! 3-4 gallons IS NOT ENOUGH!

Save your money.

However, if you go to the big orange box and buy the Wagner HVLP spray system. I think it's still under a hundred bucks and it's SOOOO MUCH BETTER for spraying than a regular spray gun and an under supplied tank.

Yes, a guitar is small and it doesn't take a lot to coat it, but, as someone else stated it's the volume of air flowing and the second the tank is empty and the compressor is working to fill it back up, the volume of air drops and the paint will flow differently.


I use a Wagner HVLP spraying system for spraying cabinetry all the time and it works fantastically. The HVLP system makes less overspray, a more even coat and won't let any oil or moisture from your compressor into the paint stream! You also get a higher volume of solids that actually end up on the workpiece. What's not to love?

Most serious professional painting systems these days are HVLP, especially in the automotive finishing business. There's a reason for it!


The cheap paint guns with small compressors are good for painting enamel on a chair that's going in the workshop or in the den, but not for a fine finish on a piece of real furniture or a musical instrument.


Yes, I know we all did it that way for years. I know, I know I know. I did it too, but once I discovered the ease of HVLP, I couldn't look back.

Axis29
December 9th, 2007, 09:24 AM
Would this work...? I could make a couple of passes with the spray gun. Pause a few seconds make another few passes, pause again and repeat. All the time the compressor would be keeping up the pressure and volume. Does that make sense or am missing how this might work.

Disclaimer, if I sound inexperienced its only because I AM! I've only used my compressor with a small brad nailer to build a few cabinets and the air nozzle to fill up tires and basketballs.

This will work, but make more work.

The edges will feather and you will get more overspray which must then be sanded out.

brandt
December 9th, 2007, 11:22 AM
The voice of experience - thanks Axis - I think I'll use a rattle can for my first project... the HVLP systems sound like the way to go for a lot of reasons.

Thanks!

jaydawg
December 9th, 2007, 05:54 PM
Listen, there is no need to go out and buy a HVLP set up or a larger compressor. I've been using a very small unit for years now and have sprayed more guitars then I remember with it. It has a 4 gal. tank and is rated at 5.5CFM.
http://i211.photobucket.com/albums/bb138/jaydawg76/DSCF0016-1.jpg
The one you have, rated at 4 CFM will do the job. If you use a small jam gun you will only be running 20-30 psi and even if the compressor has to kick on to keep up the pressure you will be OK. Here are some examples of what a small compressor can do. They look like crap don't they!!! You must need a big set up to do a good job spraying!!!!!!!
http://i211.photobucket.com/albums/bb138/jaydawg76/DSCF0004.jpg
http://i211.photobucket.com/albums/bb138/jaydawg76/DSCF0012-1.jpg

brandt
December 9th, 2007, 08:12 PM
Wow! That looks great... no shortage of opinions. I think I'll buy a cheap gun and try it - worst case I'm out $30 bucks and some paint. A test piece of maple or ash will be sacrificed... Harbor Freight has a small touch up spray gun that is $8 (made in China). I think I try that one and if it works maybe I'll get a better gun.

Thanks all - I will report my findings. It would be cool if it works...

Vizcaster
December 10th, 2007, 03:25 PM
The compressor rating is usually at 90 psi, say 3.7 for that great little pancake we all know and love. But it was made for nailguns and not for spraying or sanding or pneumatic ratchets (even though they'll sell you kits of all that crap with a tiny compressor). Basically if the compressor is running more than half the time, you're not keeping up with the gun. Here's where the guesswork comes in - you will get a little more cfm at 40 psi or 25 to 35 which is realistically where you're going to set the regulator for spraying, and you might get away with it.

I have a Porter Cable Detail Gun which has a nice little 4 oz gravity feed cup, and it works fine off the PC pancake compressor. There are two models, the more expensive HVLP conversion model hogs too much air, the standard one will be fine. Works very well for small things like necks and has a round or fan pattern for bursts. Widest pattern is maybe a five-inch fan (you'll get an 8-11" fan easily with a real grown up spray gun but you need a lot more air for it).

For entire guitar bodies I use a turbine driven HVLP system (first the Campbell Hausfeld for around $200, then graduated to a Wagner/Capspray that's a little more solid but costs $650 for turbine, hose, gun, and an extra spray tip/needle set). They're more portable than compressors but you can't change your car tires with them. I often think that a jigondo compressor in the garage would have been more versatile but I didn't think I'd want to spend the dosh on all the cool things you can run off of it.

DrewB
December 25th, 2007, 09:49 AM
Wow! That looks great... no shortage of opinions. I think I'll buy a cheap gun and try it - worst case I'm out $30 bucks and some paint. A test piece of maple or ash will be sacrificed... Harbor Freight has a small touch up spray gun that is $8 (made in China). I think I try that one and if it works maybe I'll get a better gun.

Thanks all - I will report my findings. It would be cool if it works...

Have you tried it yet? My wife got me a P-C compressor/nailer kit for Christmas that is the same spec as yours, so I need to decide if I'm keeping it or swapping it out. The ability to spray finishes is a big consideration for me.

bnjp
December 25th, 2007, 10:02 AM
I bought this 10 gallon unit from Lowes. I had to get this one to meet the minimum requirements (or suggested) on my spray gun. I really like this compressor. It rarely kicks on while I'm spraying. It's $200 so it's just a little more than the pancakes.

http://images.lowes.com/product/017565/017565227407.jpg

Here's my spray gun...also from Lowe's.

http://images.lowes.com/product/471220/4712206865883.jpg

1buba
December 25th, 2007, 02:44 PM
Folks,

I'm getting ready to do my first build also. Can y'all give me feedback on this (priced at $99.99):

http://www.woodcraft.com/images/products/147094_230.jpg
Yes, that's the correct price. We were equally surprised when we had a chance to test this system. The results weren't just passable, they were actually very good.
Thin your finish to the proper viscosity (viscosity cup and thinning ratios included) and you'll get high quality coverage from stains, lacquers, water and oil-based finishes every time. HVLP stands for High Volume Low Pressure.

* This compact unit has a 1000w motor that outputs air at 4 PSI through a bleeder-type spray gun.
* The gun has a one quart capacity with a three position spray nozzle that allows you to choose the right spray pattern for any project; horizontal, vertical or round flat positions.
* The 15' flexible hose is ideal for maneuvering around your project.

* System includes; viscosity cup, wrench and instruction manual.

Thanks,

steve

Axis29
December 25th, 2007, 09:45 PM
Folks,

I'm getting ready to do my first build also. Can y'all give me feedback on this (priced at $99.99):

http://www.woodcraft.com/images/products/147094_230.jpg (http://www.woodcraft.com/images/products/147094_230.jpg)


Thanks,

steve

Steve,

I don't know about that one specifically, but it looks very similar to the one I purchased a few years ago that's still working strong and spraying very nicely. Mine's a Wagner. The only complaint I've had with mine was that the o-ring around the top of the cup (where it attaches to the main spray body) has gone bad... but I can't complain as I've sprayed many projects with it. I need a new seal to keep the cup pressurized....

Of course, the plastic cup won't last forever either, but mine has nice bronze guides and bushings where it needs it. If I was spraying all day, every day, It might not last forever, but I've probably used it on twenty or more projects... some rather large cabinet jobs and it has performed flawlessly.

Mine was on clearance and I paid less than 99 for it (I think 89) plus shipping. It's more than earned it's purchase price back!

daveswenson
December 26th, 2007, 12:31 AM
The thing to watch with the cheaper single stage turbine hvlp setups is the viscosity of the medium you are spraying. With only one turbine you are limited to thinner finishes. That being said, I've sprayed a lot of finish with a single stage. Lacquer sprays great, just thin it a little. I wouldn't try spraying latex paint ( but I doubt you're spraying that on a guitar).

Just remember the gun is held close to the object being sprayed.

Dave

Axis29
December 26th, 2007, 02:51 PM
The thing to watch with the cheaper single stage turbine hvlp setups is the viscosity of the medium you are spraying. With only one turbine you are limited to thinner finishes. That being said, I've sprayed a lot of finish with a single stage. Lacquer sprays great, just thin it a little. I wouldn't try spraying latex paint ( but I doubt you're spraying that on a guitar).

Just remember the gun is held close to the object being sprayed.

Dave

Hey Dave,

I've actually sprayed a lot of latex with my single stage el cheapo. You just have to be careful, as you said, about viscosity. I use a bit of Flotrol in my latex... works like a charm.

As far as spraying lacquers, boy it's beautiful finish and so easy with such little waste.

For clears, I really like the General Finishes High Performance Polyurethane. It's a nice water borne poly that is perfectly mixed for HVLP spraying.

I keep threatening to try and spray some form of shelac and nitro, but haven't gotten around to it yet.

1buba
December 26th, 2007, 03:22 PM
Cool deal. I have a coupon and a couple of Christmas gift cards. i may get this down to about $30 out of pocket!!! :-)