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Frequency range of a guitar in HZ?

Captainobvious
October 28th, 2003, 07:34 PM
I should know this. Whats the frequency range in hz that a guitar typically plays? I know this can vary between guitars and pickups, etc.

Doc
October 28th, 2003, 07:35 PM
I believe you just need to check out the frequency specs for electric guitar speakers to get a sense. I am sure weber's site or celestion will give you what you want.

Dale

Doug R
October 28th, 2003, 07:56 PM
Rounding off the decimal points, here are the frequencies in Hz, or cycles-per-second:

4-string bass:

E - 41
A- 55
D- 74
G- 99
(Hi G @12th fret - 198)

Guitar:


E- 82
A- 110
D- 146
G- 196
B- 247
E- 330
(Hi E @ 12th fret - 660)

Harmonic tones will be in multiples of those frequencies, doubling for each octave.

This can come in handy if you have graphic equalizers in your sound set-up.

Captainobvious
October 28th, 2003, 08:09 PM
Thanks doug !

Michael Murphy
October 28th, 2003, 08:23 PM
This source says 82.4Hz- 1319Hz for a guitar:

LINKY (http://216.239.57.104/search?q=cache:Qm04HyRETtMJ:ceae.colorado.edu/~muehleis/classes/aren4020/handouts/lecture1/frequency_range.pdf+guitar+frequency+range&hl=en&ie=UTF-8)

That would be low E to 24th fret high E...

Standard bass goes down to 41.2Hz.


-Michael
Charter Member S. Texas He-Man Emoticon Haters Local #316

Dacious
October 28th, 2003, 08:38 PM
There are also overtones and harmonics. I think Ted Weber posted before that it's mostly all over above about 5khz. Note that an acoustic guitar puts out freqs similar to a human voice and goes up to 10+khz.

Bob Rogers
October 28th, 2003, 09:24 PM
Michael has it right. Doug's frequencies are an octave too high (double the number of Hz). All the frequencies mentioned are the fundamental of the vibrating string. The harmonics or overtones theoretically go on forever. In practice, my guess is that four octaves, the sixteenth harmonic, sixteen times the frequency of the fundamental is way more than anyone hears.