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Dwight Yoakam guitarist

tgomes1987
February 28th, 2007, 02:33 AM
hello im new to the forum first post oh ya!! Nice to be here. I am looking for a tube amp and i wanted to know if anyone knew what kind of amp/guitar setup dwight yoakam's guitarist played i really like how it sounded. i think his name was Pete Anderson

Big White Tele
February 28th, 2007, 02:58 AM
Pete Anderson was Dwight's guitarist, producer untill about 2003. I now own one of his Custom shop Tele's and one of his 66 Deluxe Reverbs, modified with 6L6's and a Twin Reverb Out put tranny, and running an EV 12S speaker. Heres a link to a performance with him using the guitar and amp that I bought from him. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YvMwWrW-U9A

Big White Tele
February 28th, 2007, 03:06 AM
About 1998 or so, Pete started using Tom Anderson Guitars, and then around 2000, was using Line 6 Vetta heads. Most say that his original tone with the Fenders was his best. I would agree. One of his most memorable pieces with Dwight is 1000 miles from nowhere, (that the rumor is) was recorded with a Fender Custom shop tele with Tremolo into an early Vox AC30 cranked. But his tone in general has been Fender deluxe reverb. Theres a good interview at Vintage guitar magazine,http://www.vintageguitar.com/artists/details.asp?ID=64 He has his own website at Little dog records. Hope this helps!!!

Filthy McNasty
February 28th, 2007, 08:42 AM
I bought Pete's "Roots Rock Workout" dvd and on the extras he does a demo with Line 6 Flex amp with Twin and Deluxe settings.

KnopflerStyle
February 28th, 2007, 09:04 AM
Pete is one of my fav guitar player... Please buy the Austin City Limits DVD where Pete plays with some kind of Esquire and others babys... but the licks there are awesome specially in 1000 miles.
Dwight Yoakam .. he is not the same since Pete left the band....

Big Smokey
February 28th, 2007, 01:02 PM
I opened for Pete Anderson last year and he was playing an Epiphone Hollowbody through an AC30 (but that may not be his standard rig). I got the chance to briefly talk gear with him and he mentioned that he used many different amps for recording with Dwight: His Fender Deluxe, Twins, AC30's etc..

Poppatwang
February 28th, 2007, 01:16 PM
Last time in town backing Moot Davis, he was playing the Epi thru the Line 6.

TheGoodTexan
February 28th, 2007, 01:23 PM
Line 6 use to put out a yearly or bi-yearly magazine/catalog similar to the Fender Frontline.

I remember reading an article on Pete in one of them, circa 2000. They said that Pete brought in his go-to Deluxe (not sure which one it was...maybe the one that Big White Tele speaks of).....and had them "model" it for him. They put that specific amp through their digital modeling process, and gave him a chip for POD 2.0 and Flextone amps, so that he could have that specific amp model anywhere he went.

PhatTele
February 28th, 2007, 01:27 PM
It's a natural finish Epiphone Joe Pass Emperor with a Bigsby and Fralin P90s. He's been here to Richmond a couple of times with Moot Davis and we've gotten a chance to talk with him a bit. Really nice guy and what a great tone. Those Line 6 sounded fine.

Meanwhile, if you go back and see the Dwight Yoakam Live at Austin City Limits video, he's using an Esquire through a BF Deluxe Reverb for most of the show.

There's also an extended interview with him in couple of issues of ToneQuest report (three or more years ago I think). He gives a great explanation about how he employs midrange in his BF Fender sound.

dtube
February 28th, 2007, 02:22 PM
Pete and his wife were featured in TapeOp magazine last month. In the article, he maintained that he doesn't use amps to record anymore - all plug n' play Line6 stuff.
-Darren

FrankB
February 28th, 2007, 03:52 PM
Pete and his wife were featured in TapeOp magazine last month. In the article, he maintained that he doesn't use amps to record anymore - all plug n' play Line6 stuff.
-Darren

And that's about as lazy as a producer can get - I've used plug and play and in my own personal opinion, it sucks. You don;t fill the air around things at all and the guitars can just sound small and characterless. I won't use it. Reason I did use it was due to a lazy engineer and producer who just wanted to dial something up on protools instead of setting up amps and mics....
wow I sound like a retro grouch :shock: no offense intended I just felt like expressing my opinion.

Charlie Bernstein
February 28th, 2007, 04:17 PM
Welcome, tgomes!

Folks are throwing you a lot of info. Here's a simple answer:

It takes more than an amp to sound like Pete Anderson. But to get that nice, bouncy, bitey sound for under $1,000, I'd test drive some Fender Hot Rod Series tube amps, and see which one fits your ear and your wallet.

This isn't a Fender commercial, but for reliablility and ear-worthiness at a reachable price, there's not a whole lot out there.

Big White Tele
February 28th, 2007, 07:32 PM
The original question speaks of the tone on Dwights stuff. Pete Anderson's sound has changed a lot over the years. Perhaps we need to know what songs on what recordings to answer best. The last Dwight CD that Pete produced, sounds very different than, This Time, or Hillbilly Deluxe. His work with Moot is different again, by Design. Id think that he wants it to be different.

Chris S.
February 28th, 2007, 08:22 PM
Pete Anderson was Dwight's guitarist, producer untill about 2003. I now own one of his Custom shop Tele's and one of his 66 Deluxe Reverbs, modified with 6L6's and a Twin Reverb Out put tranny, and running an EV 12S speaker.
That's so cool that you own those, :cool: I always loved the sound of his DR's. And thanks for sharing all the great Pete A. info. :-)

Just out of curiosity: do you have any idea how many watts your Deluxe is now putting out? (I would guess that with the 6L6's and that big iron that it's a lot more than the standard 22w... :?:) Thx again, CS :-)

Big White Tele
February 28th, 2007, 11:56 PM
Hi Chris, I really dont know how many watts it would push, but the Ot is from a 66 Twin Reverb, 2 6L6"s would make it half of a Twin, Im not sure if that would translate into 85 divided by 2= 42.5? I can say that compared to my 66 Twin, the Deluxe still breaks up before it, but compared to my stock 64 Deluxe Reverb, its about 30% louder before breakup. There is so much more to this amp than you can imagine. I know that Red Rhoads had done the mods, and Pete talks about the midrange mod to the Deluxes which equates to having a mid control turned to 10. This amp sounds like it has a built in Compressor. Anderson say's he never used a comp, and its no wonder. This amp does it on its own. Its just a beautifull piece of work. I wish I could share it with you all. If you take a Stock Blackface Deluxe, add a EV12s speaker, use a Anologman comp, or keeley, and an EQ pedal, you get very close to the same tone, but the feel is something else. Theres still a lot of magic in this amp. And the Guitar.... thats another story..Incredible. I cant imagine a better Tele.

Acephspades
March 1st, 2007, 02:05 AM
Go to Pete's website, www.peteanderson.com and look through the Blue Lounge pages. Pete gives away a few secrets through questions sent to him by his fans. From what I recall Pete in the beginning used Deluxe Reverbs til about 1990 then switched over to Fender Vibro Kings and a Fender Tone Master along with a Groove Tubes Soul-o head. He used the Tone Master and the Groove Tube amp for his more rock-like songs. He also dabbled with the Tweed Blues Deluxe amp upon their invent in the early to mid 90's but I don't think he ever recorded with one. Somewhere in the late 90's he began using the Amp Farm recording software and his last few albums with Dwight were done without an amp period. Then in the 2000's he started using Line 6 stuff and last summer I saw him with Moot Davis he was using a pair of Line 6 Flextone II's.

For me his best stuff was the early Dwight material up to and partially including the "This Time" album. I also liked his more aggresive tone on "Dwight Live" it's a bit more distorted than his studio stuff. I am still up in the air about his tone on the "This Time" album mostly because the production seemed really heavy. I thought Pete's tone was a little to smooth and just lacked the edge I grew to love from his early stuff but "This Time" was such a great all around album, Dwight's most consistent album IMO.

People have commented on Pete's early tone and raw edgy style and their love for it but he has consistently said he can't do it anymore. Can't or won't. When I saw him last summer with Moot Davis he played great stuff but he never "tore one down" like I was hoping but Moot is even more traditional than Dwight at least thus far and Pete was playing it safe IMO. Pete seems more interested in producing and playing for the song as opposed to shreding and I miss that.

Chris S.
March 1st, 2007, 03:11 AM
Hey, thanks again for all the info sounds like quite an amp. :-) And I bet you're right, it's probably in the neighborhood of 40-something watts (but I'm sure there's more involved than I know anything about.) ;-)

This amp sounds like it has a built in Compressor. Anderson say's he never used a comp
I used a compressor once: I had a sofa that one of the feet had broken off of, and that little red Dyna-Comp leveled it out perfectly. Handy thing to have around the house. :mrgreen: CS

JohnnyCrash
March 1st, 2007, 03:32 AM
Get yourself a Fender Deluxe Reverb. Put in some good tubes and have it biased. Maybe replace the speaker with a good vintage styled AlNiCo.

Fender Vibro Kings are still being sold, right?

Anyways, a reissue '65 Deluxe Reverb should get you in the ballpark. I'd imagine you'd have to play it loud to get a tad of natural compression.


Pete and his wife were featured in TapeOp magazine last month. In the article, he maintained that he doesn't use amps to record anymore - all plug n' play Line6 stuff.
-Darren


Yeah, and it sounds like ASS.

The backing tracks he did for that Guitar Center "King of the Blues" contest sound like robots, synths, and Line 6... yuck. Early Dwight on the other hand sounds great!

Last band I was in, I refused to go Line 6 after hearing the tracks the other guitar player did. Close, but still no guitar... er cigar.

frank4001
March 1st, 2007, 03:43 PM
I had DR set up like that, 'cept for the tranny, for long time. It was the most portable versatile machine I think I've ever owned. Sounded great with all types of guitars and volume was tremendous. I had no trouble keeping up with the loudest bands. I've since put it back to stock except for a neg feedback control and use it for lower volume gigs and as a backup. It would be last amp I'd ever sell. They just do everything right. I think the EV is 80% of the equation for the Pete Anderson stuff..That low end...

Rob DiStefano
March 2nd, 2007, 07:02 AM
... I got the chance to briefly talk gear with him and he mentioned that he used many different amps for recording with Dwight: His Fender Deluxe, Twins, AC30's etc..

Unlike the old dayze, these dayze most guitar artists are recording with studio gear - studio guitars and amps. It's the exception, not the rule, to find a player/band using their own gear for most recorded tunes. Ask me how I know this ...

eddiewagner
March 2nd, 2007, 08:14 AM
Ask me how I know this ...

he rob, how do you know?

Rob DiStefano
March 2nd, 2007, 08:22 AM
he rob, how do you know?

I maintain the guitars and basses for a number of recording studios and one of 'em is getting good props in the business. I never realized just how many recordings were made with studio gear, it was pretty enlightening to me. Chatting with other techs at other studios around the country confirmed this as well. Hard to imagine it's as prevalent as it is ... :confused:

Big White Tele
March 2nd, 2007, 04:49 PM
Except for Brad Paisley, Brent Mason, all the guys who's tone we talk about!

JohnnyCrash
March 2nd, 2007, 06:39 PM
Some places here in L.A. actually have guitar/amp wranglers that rent gear per session.

In either case, Rob is right, most stuff that is recorded isn't on personal gear...

Still, what these guys use on the road is often what they have already "taste tested" in the studio. Listening to live cuts is just as awe inspiring... most of these guys know good tone and take it on the road with them.

So, just because what was recorded on wasn't their personal amp, don't discredit their signature sounds either :)

tgomes1987
March 3rd, 2007, 01:47 AM
well the songs i like with his guitar are guitars cadillacs, turn it on turn it up turn it loose, and fast as you. thanks

Big White Tele
March 4th, 2007, 04:07 PM
The first two are a Fender Tele into the Deluxe Reverb, Fast as you is a Strat into a Deluxe Reverb. Sounds like all you need is a Good Tele and a Fender DR, or Twin to get really close. Good luck.

klasaine
March 4th, 2007, 04:53 PM
I maintain the guitars and basses for a number of recording studios and one of 'em is getting good props in the business. I never realized just how many recordings were made with studio gear, it was pretty enlightening to me. Chatting with other techs at other studios around the country confirmed this as well. Hard to imagine it's as prevalent as it is ... :confused:
Well I would add or amend to that ... the more "esoteric or specialized" stuff yes - ie; a Ric 12 string, really high-end archtops ala Johnny Smith's and/or D'Angelico's. Vintage Marshalls, AC-30's and funky old Valcos, etc. Maybe a few really 'out there' pedals. Possibly it's because everybody in L.A. has a decent size car or truck (or cartage if you're a double scale guy) we use our own gear most of the time. A lot of producers like to use the "studio" amps because they are very familiar with how to mic and record those particular pieces of gear.

JohnnyCrash
March 5th, 2007, 05:07 AM
Well I would add or amend to that ... the more "esoteric or specialized" stuff yes - ie; a Ric 12 string, really high-end archtops ala Johnny Smith's and/or D'Angelico's. Vintage Marshalls, AC-30's and funky old Valcos, etc. Maybe a few really 'out there' pedals. Possibly it's because everybody in L.A. has a decent size car or truck (or cartage if you're a double scale guy) we use our own gear most of the time. A lot of producers like to use the "studio" amps because they are very familiar with how to mic and record those particular pieces of gear.

That's been my experience as well down here.

Generally, guitars are "the more the merrier", so if the guy bring an axe or two, cool... but when it comes to amps, the guys tend to want the players to use what the studio guys already know. The fewer "added" options the better - with amps.

I may have to join the Deluxe Reverb club... as it is, I've got enough amps (mostly tweed clones) to choke a horse with, but "Guitars, Cadillacs" tone always sticks in my head :)