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Scales To Lead Over

joel_ostrom
January 24th, 2007, 01:41 AM
Hey folks,

I need some help with some lead scales. I've been trying to learn how to improvise lead riffs and solos over certain scales, but I'm a bit limited in my knowledge of exactly which notes are associated with which scales (minor or major).

Could somebody perhaps tab out a few scales for me to use as reference when I'm picking notes to use over a progression. I'm looking for a box pattern to follow in a Pentatonic Major and Minor scale.

If somebody could show me the pattern (or at least the notes to play) in a Pentatonic Minor/Major scale of the keys of G,A and D I might be able to figure out the other scales on my own.

Other than that, could anybody suggest any techniques I could use that allow me to better improvise riffs over certain chords and progressions? I know that mapping out the fret-board is always a good start, anybody got anything that worked for them?

Thanks again,
Cheers,
Joel:wink:

tonebender
January 24th, 2007, 05:03 AM
I'm in calgary, and I know of some hot pickers that may be able to show you some stuff. I know some scales alll over the fretboard maybe I could show you some stuff. I seem to do well at improvising. Not saying that I'm an amazing player, but I can get by ok

Chris S.
January 24th, 2007, 06:31 AM
If somebody could show me the pattern (or at least the notes to play) in a Pentatonic Minor/Major scale of the keys of G,A and D I might be able to figure out the other scales on my own.
Here's one site that might help:

http://www.guitarconsultant.com/pentatonic.html

There are likely dozens and dozens of others. ;-) Try Googling "pentatonic scales."

Other than that, could anybody suggest any techniques I could use that allow me to better improvise riffs over certain chords and progressions?
Yup. Sing an improvisational phrase or two (or an entire solo) into a tape recorder while playing the chords to whatever progression(s) you're using, then go back and figure out how to play what you sang on the guitar. It may be slow going at first, but you'll be training your fingers how to play what you're hearing in your head, rather than just memorizing fretboard patterns.

The other best thing you can do that will speed your development is to learn to play the melody of the song(s) you like most. :idea:

I know that mapping out the fret-board is always a good start, anybody got anything that worked for them?
I don't know any easy way around this one. You need to learn the names of all the notes on the fretboard, and it might take awhile.

Start on either E string, and say the names of the notes you're playing out loud. (It doesn't hurt to sing them either.) ;-) Open string is E, 1st fret is F, 2nd fret is F# and/or Gb, 3rd fret is G, etc. Go all the way up to the top of the neck (The notes repeat starting at the 12 fret, so it gets a little easier in that sense.)

Once you've finished learning all the notes on the E string, go to either the B string or the A string and start all over. Work your way across the strings until you know them all. Again, a slow process, but it will get faster as you do it.

Eventually you'll know that when you want to play an "F" note on the A string, it's at the 8th fret but don't expect to learn it all overnight. :-\ There's an old saying, "You have to learn to walk before you can run, and crawl before you can walk." ;-) But keep at it, it's worth it. :-)

Hope it helps, CS :-)