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Most influential bass players?

KokoTele
April 17th, 2006, 09:00 PM
I was listening to some old Mowtown stuff today and it got me thinking that James Jamerson might be the most influential and important bass player in the history of popular music, followed closely by Paul McCartney and Duck Dunn. Seems to me that nearly all bass playing since then can be traced directly to one of these three.

What do you guys think?

Captain Simian
April 17th, 2006, 09:37 PM
I think that Paul was more influential than Jamerson, but not by much. I think Jaco would be the third most influential.

vic108
April 17th, 2006, 10:04 PM
Tim Drummond is no slouch either......

ask Jim Keltner

Tim Armstrong
April 17th, 2006, 10:08 PM
I know a heck of a lot of "modern" bassists (not my style at all, but I can dig others doing it) whov'e been deeply influenced by Victor Wooten...

Cheers, Tim

zombywoof
April 17th, 2006, 10:22 PM
I agree with the Jamerson selection. The one bass player, however, whom I liked and still think highly of (although I doubt he could be considered influential) is Jack Casady. I had never seen chords played like that on a bass. I am still amazed when I listen to Crown of Creation and some of that stuff.

Robin Nahum
April 17th, 2006, 10:39 PM
To me, Stanley Clarke and Jaco Pastorius each defined a new way of playing. Victor Wootten seems to be taking up where Stanley left off - although he is obviously influenced by Jaco as well.

Both Stanley and Jaco were at the forefront of turning the bass from a backing rhythm instrument into a melody instrument.

I'm not a bassist so all this is from a listener's perspective.

David Barnett
April 17th, 2006, 11:07 PM
Both Stanley and Jaco were at the forefront of turning the bass from a backing rhythm instrument into a melody instrument.



I've never quite decided if they should be commended for that, or castigated.

:)


More bassists who played on a lot of hit records and may have influenced a lot of bassists were Carol Kaye and Joe Osborne. Chris Squire was also influential for a time, and introduced a new style for the instrument. Oh, and Larry Graham was the forerunner of Funk bass.

But everyone listed in this thread so far was influenced by James Jamerson in some way or another.

The Bone
April 17th, 2006, 11:16 PM
8)

BLACKCAT69
April 17th, 2006, 11:20 PM
Maybe not THE most influential but certainly amongst rock bass players - John Entwistle inspired a lot of people.

OutlawSteph1975
April 17th, 2006, 11:31 PM
Whoever turned the bass into a lead instrument was the greatest. I'm thinking of the style of bass playing in southern rock of Berry Oakey (Allman Brothers Band), Tommy Caldwell (Marshall Tucker Band), and the several bass players in Charles Daniels Band and the Outlaws.

KokoTele
April 17th, 2006, 11:41 PM
Entwistle's not one I thought of, and I suppose John Paul Jones should be listed as influential to rock players a generation later too.

And while Clarke, Wooten, and Pastorious are amazing musicians, I don't think I'd list them as being particularly influential, except to a small sphere of other bass-player whiz kids. I'd judge their talent as similar to Gatton's on guitar. Most musicians can appreciate the technical merit, some can even play on that level, but the influence is confined to a very small group of people.

Tele295
April 17th, 2006, 11:43 PM
Jimmy Blanton (Duke Ellington)
Scott LaFaro (Bill Evans)

John Harrison
April 17th, 2006, 11:52 PM
For my money, these are the most influential electric bassists. Everyone else seems to be doing some variation on the foundations that these bassists laid.

James Jamerson (and Carol Kaye)
Paul McCartney
Jack Bruce
Duck Dunn
Larry Graham
Jaco Pastorius
Stanley Clarke

Ptrallan01
April 18th, 2006, 02:15 AM
Bootsy Collins for his work with James Brown and Parliment/Funakdelic.

Larry Graham, Stanley Clarke, Ron Carter among others.

slauson slim
April 18th, 2006, 02:25 AM
Carol Kaye, Ray Pohlman, Joe Osborne, David Hood, Jerry Jammott, James Jamerson, Duck Dunn.

winny pooh
April 18th, 2006, 05:22 AM
As a younger member here I would add Tony Levin, cos he's great and for the sheer mass of music he has played on. His site Papabear has the full list, scary.

Tom P.
April 18th, 2006, 06:05 AM
Lotta great names here.
Dunno about MOST influential but there a many big names that will say they were inspired by Tommy Cogbill.
Funky Broadway, Son of a Preacherman, Natural Woman, Chain of Fools, Do Right Woman, Respect, I Never Loved a Man - most of Aretha big hits. Pocket and melody at the same time, just beautiful.
Let us not forget Rocco Prestia or Chuck Rainey.

Bones
April 18th, 2006, 06:11 AM
Willie Dixon

Colo Springs E
April 18th, 2006, 07:16 AM
Both Stanley and Jaco were at the forefront of turning the bass from a backing rhythm instrument into a melody instrument.



I've never quite decided if they should be commended for that, or castigated.I vote "castigated..."

chickenpicker
April 18th, 2006, 07:20 AM
I recall reading that Jet Harris, from Cliff Richard's backing band The Shadows, had the first electric bass in the UK. Just as Hank influenced guitarists, so Jet is creited with being at the forefront of bass playing, and would have influenced other bass players.

Jim W
April 18th, 2006, 07:27 AM
I agree with many of above names Dunn,Osborne, Hood, Jammont, Cogbill,etc.
I would second Willie Dixon
I would add Tommy McClure and Jack Bruce to the list

You need to include in this Dave Meyers (of the Aces, a Chicago Blues Band-played with Little Walter, Sonny Boy Williamson and others). He was one of the first muscians to use the electric bass period.

There is also British bassists- Colin Hodgkson (spelling) that I believe is playing of and on with Spencer Davis . He has played on numerous recordings, but the first time I heard he was playing in a trio bass, sax, and drums - incredible player - but much much more than the bassist locks in with the drummer to give that tremedous groove (Dunn - Jackson; Creeson and McClure; Meyers and Below, Osborne and Blaine, Watts and Wyman) amongs others

Joel Terry
April 18th, 2006, 07:43 AM
For my money, these are the most influential electric bassists. Everyone else seems to be doing some variation on the foundations that these bassists laid.

James Jamerson (and Carol Kaye)
Paul McCartney
Jack Bruce
Duck Dunn
Larry Graham
Jaco Pastorius
Stanley Clarke

I agree, John--bassist for bassist. :wink:

Joel

chipl
April 18th, 2006, 10:07 AM
I agree with lots of names here, Jaco, Stanley Clarke, Enwistle (a one man rhythm section since Moonie was not a timekeeper) Paul, Duck Dunn, Jack Bruce. I also liked Phil Lesh's bass work with the Dead, too.

But for me, James Jamerson is the MAN. After seeing the Standing in the Shadows of Motown DVD, I was just totally awed by his sound, style, touch and unique sense of rhythm. He was such a propulsive player who along with the Funk Brothers kept those Motown songs chugging along with that irrepressible beat. From then on, every time I hear a Motown song on the radio, I isolate the bass track as best I can and turn up the bass, and every time I think what a wonderful musician James was. Too bad he left us too early.

rand z
April 18th, 2006, 10:17 AM
greatest is subjective , but here's my lis:

- charles mingus
- ray brown
- duck dunn
- james jamerson
- jack bruce (in his heyday)
- paul mccartney
- jaco pastorius (maybe the BEST)
- dave holland
- victor wooten (maybe the BEST)
- roy husky jr
- jack cassidy
- jim mayer (much more than buffett's bassist)
- charlie hayden
- phil lesh

all imho

rand z (tropicalsoul.net)

Andy R
April 18th, 2006, 10:25 AM
C'mon guys---Ray Brown!!

castigated +1

Stiles
April 18th, 2006, 12:11 PM
Don't forget Milt Hinton. There's be no Mingus without him IMO.

Grin'n'pick
April 18th, 2006, 02:14 PM
Influential - for a lot of current kids I'd say Flea must get a mention. Important? In a development of the instrument sense that's doubtful. Perhaps of that generation Les Claypool inspired quite a few kids to pick up the bass too.

In the UK Mark King from Level 42 was influential in giving mainstream exposure to melodic and virtuoso bass lines, but was probably too derivitive to be important as it were. However in this country at least you would probably have needed to be a pretty progressive bass player yourself to know what slap was before he came along, and after he did EVERYBODY was doing it.

Pino Paladino for his fretless work should maybe get a mention as he's played on a lot of hit records with quite an individual style (esp. fretless). And what about John Squire or Geddy Lee?

But actually scrub ALL the names out so far, for there is only one: Lemmy from Motorhead :D

CancerLeoCam
April 18th, 2006, 02:19 PM
...is still 'king' in my book. No junk there.

J-man
April 20th, 2006, 11:19 AM
Can't believe Flea hasn't made the list yet. :)

jwsamuel
April 20th, 2006, 12:20 PM
I'd add Lee Sklar for being what a bass player should be.

Jim

freshmattyp
April 20th, 2006, 04:04 PM
I'd add Bruce Thomas from the Attractions and Graham Maby from the Joe Jackson Band.

Telecicle
April 20th, 2006, 04:11 PM
I've been trying to work some Jamerson style lines into my guitar playing. He was masterful at leaving just the right amount of space.

Grey
April 20th, 2006, 05:50 PM
Billy Sheehan
Jeff Ament
Mark King
John Entwistle
Les Claypool
Stu Hamm
Victor Wooten

Geo
April 20th, 2006, 07:06 PM
Harvey Brooks
Johnny B. Gayden
Jerry Jemmott
Chuck Rainey
Tommy Cogsbil
David Hungate
Bob Babbit
James Jamerson
Gary Link
Dan Fisher
Dean Goodsell
Alan Woody

A little bias as I played with the last 4 and they were
very good in so many ways to work with.

l

mr natural
April 20th, 2006, 09:31 PM
Family Man. Reggae Bass playing at its best. Nice guy, too.
-Mr. N.

chipl
April 20th, 2006, 10:20 PM
Harvey Brooks


Now there's an unsung hero of the bass, a veteran of the 60s NYC folk-rock-jazz scene/sessions...played with Dylan, Super-Session with Al Kooper, Bloomfield and Stills, plus the Electric Flag, and countless other sessions. I think he played with Hendrix, too, although not on any commercial releases.

When I was a teenager, and an avid reader of album liner notes, you would see Harvey's name all over the place. Certainly was influential in that time and scene.

dean
April 20th, 2006, 10:32 PM
I think you could add Tina Weymouth of Talking Heads to the list and be pretty safe. I also get a kick out of Flea and Mike Gordon of Phish.

Dean

KokoTele
April 20th, 2006, 10:40 PM
For those of you that posted only names, would you mind adding some more info about the work they did and why you think they're highly influential? I don't want to argue with you, there's just a lot of names I don't recognize.

I think some folks strayed from my question of who's been the most influential to just naming some great bass players. I started thinking about this because I'd been thinking of the development of music into what it is today, so just naming great musiciains isn't helping me much.

Willie Dixon was mentioned, and I'm not so sure about his influence or importance as a bass player. It seems to me that he was playing mostly standard lines. But there's no doubt in my mind of his influence as a songwriter, producer, arranger, business man, and talent scout.

Here's another good question: which bass player orginated that early punk sound? I'm talking about the P-Bass through a bright amp and just bashing away at a single note in double-time.

Joe Harris
April 21st, 2006, 08:42 AM
greatest is subjective , but here's my lis:


- jack bruce (in his heyday)

rand z (tropicalsoul.net)

He dropped the EB-3 and Marshalls and went to a Fretless w/ a clean sound. IMHO he's better than ever.

sixstringbastard
April 21st, 2006, 12:06 PM
My first instrument was electric bass. My "heroes" that I admired were Mike Mills(REM), Sting(police-era), McCartney and Ox.
I only switched to guitar because there were so many darn bassists at the time(where did they all go??)

Mike

singlecoilheaven
April 21st, 2006, 12:21 PM
I can't believe this thread has gone this far without someone mentioning John Paul Jones. There was a discussion a while back on another board, and many bass players said "the Lemon Song" was what made them want to play bass. I don't play bass, but he is one of my favorites.

snoglobe
April 21st, 2006, 03:02 PM
Derek Smalls

(mostly because he was constantly working with a new drummer)

:lol: :lol: :lol:

Gene Tunney
April 21st, 2006, 03:16 PM
The 3 M's Mingus, McCartney and the late Dee Murray.

Gene Tunney 8)

stevedenver
April 21st, 2006, 05:54 PM
Carol Kaye

check out her bio at carolkaye.com

youll all recognize the tunes shes done-its mind blowing-

if you read the tunes-she is THE bass heard on so many 50's-60's and 70's studio work for jazz. blues, TV, and movies-she did "The Beat Goes On", "Sloop John B.", Mission IMpossible, MASH, Brady Bunch, Adams Family, backed Ray CHarles, Sam Cooke, Frank Zappa, Quincy Jones, played on Joe Cockers Feelin Alright, Steve wonders i was made to love her, Batman theme, some of the Monkees hits, Count BAsie and Cannonball Adderly, howlin wolf...

imean if you check out what shes done its incredible!!!!!!

the sheer breadth of what shes done, as far as i know, sets her apart from almost anyone else

youll see why i think she was so influential

mudshark
April 21st, 2006, 08:11 PM
Berry Oakley
Scott Thunes
Larry Taylor
Joey Spampinato
Rick Danko
Kenny Gradney
Carl Radle

and no bass list complete without Bill Black

Grin'n'pick
April 24th, 2006, 05:31 AM
<Smacks Forehead> Can't believe I left out Bernard Edwards. </Smacks Forehead>

dented
April 24th, 2006, 05:44 PM
Let me see..hmmm....influential...
For me Jack Bruce, I dropped my old Silvertone 6 string, went to the music store and pleaded with Mom for that cherry red EB3 on the wall, 'cause it had freight train all over it and I wanted to rock and play like him! It was used, a few nicks here and there, Mom bought it for 265.00 with OHSC. Stolen with my Les Paul custom in 1985. Played it for almost 18 years and didn't pick up a six string again until it was gone. Still dig the old Jack.

Simpleman73
April 25th, 2006, 08:35 PM
George Porter Jr.

Allen Woody

Charlie Hayward (Very Underrated)

One of my Favs. is James Lomenzo--Durring Pride and Glory, and Book of Shadows from Zakk Wylde. He also did a cool Jazz/Fusion with the Hideous Sun Demons

PraiseCaster
April 25th, 2006, 08:53 PM
Mybe I dont know bass much, but one that I found to be influential during the 70's and 80's was Geddy Lee of Rush. So solid and aggressive in style. It Sounds like he listened incesantly to Jack Bruce and turned it up several notches.

But then again, what do I know? No seriously, what do I know, I'd really like to know..................?

franchelB
April 27th, 2006, 08:06 PM
There are some great bassists mentioned here. What I want to know is whether it's an accident omitting the names of Terry "Geezer" Butler and Steve Harris or not?
Granted both play in heavy metal bands (and not everyone listens to heavy metal), but one cannot deny the impact these 2 bass players have had on their fans.

Grin'n'pick
April 27th, 2006, 08:37 PM
I nearly mentioned Steve Harris myself. Hard to know if we love love him because he is a great bass player as such or because he is such a driving force in general in that great band. Maiden would be pretty lame without him and they must have influenced a lot of bands so I think he most probably deserves a place reserved for him on this thread. Just as long as his favourite footy team don't beat LFC in the cup final, I might have to change my mind if the Hammers do us.

psychetelec
October 24th, 2007, 04:28 PM
The 3 M's Mingus, McCartney and the late Dee Murray.

Gene Tunney 8)

I know its an old thread but as I was browzing I came across Dee Murray's name. Dee was a great player, and the biggest reason I got into playing bass, a true inspiration. 30 years later I'm a professional bassist and the proud owner of one of Dee's basses. A Steinberger heard on "I Guess That's Why They Call It The Blues".
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v383/iamthebassman/deebass2.jpg
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v383/iamthebassman/deebass1.jpg
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v383/iamthebassman/deebasscoa.jpg

Tim Armstrong
October 24th, 2007, 04:41 PM
Cool!!!

Cheers, Tim

11 Gauge
October 24th, 2007, 04:43 PM
My vote is definitely for Chris Squire, as he's one of the first bassists that I really took notice of.

Probably the most influental heavy rock bassist would have to be Geezer Butler. I saw a recent Black Sabbath concert on VH1 Classic. Dio, Iommi, and Appice were okay, but Geezer was astounding. It made me aware that much of the driving power behind Black Sabbath was actually Geezer...

...And Steve Harris picked up where Geezer left off. Metal bassists could have been content with using a pick and mimicking the guitar lines. Luckily, there were some bassists who decided to go above and beyond.

Les Claypool is another incredible guy. But he's so strange and unique that I wonder how influential he actually is.

Telemarkman
October 24th, 2007, 04:53 PM
I don't know about influential, but we must not forget Rick Danko, one of the most "musical" bass players in rock music. He sure influenced me.......

olewichita
October 24th, 2007, 04:55 PM
i think the greatest unsung hero of electric bass is tommy cogbill... tj

Pete Galati
October 24th, 2007, 05:02 PM
I imagine that most influential has to depend on who you're talking about influencing.

I didn't notice Tim Bogart or Jaco Pastorius mentioned, and they should be. Also Mel Schacher of Grand Funk. Steve Swallow..... no wait, nobody's heard of him.

Telemarkman
October 24th, 2007, 05:07 PM
I imagine that most influential has to depend on who you're talking about influencing.

I didn't notice Tim Bogart or Jaco Pastorius mentioned, and they should be. Also Mel Schacher of Grand Funk. Steve Swallow..... no wait, nobody's heard of him.

Jaco Pastorius is certainly mentioned in several posts on p.1 of this thread, and yes - I've heard of Steve Swallow.....:wink:

bluetele54
October 24th, 2007, 05:11 PM
...the work of "Lucky" Scott with Curtis Mayfield...all you have to do is listen to the "Superfly" album to hear one of the hookiest players ever...havn't seen the name Willie Weeks (but I havn't looked VERY closely to every post),but his solo on "Voices Inside (Everything is Everything) on "Donny Hathaway--Live" was a must learn for a ton of funky bass players...as Donny said "...the baddest bass player in the country..." check it!!!...Rocco Prestia (Tower),and Fly Brooks (Elvin Bishop) always talked about John Knight,an East Bay/Oakland/Richmond,CA LEGEND!!!,that not too many new about...no prob here with Jamerson (one can NEVER deny his influence),MaCCa,Jaco,Mingus,Blanton,Ray Brown,Jimmy Garrison anyone???,Louis Steinberg(Booker T's bassist before Dunn,and part of a royal musical family in Memphis---probably taught Duck a thing or two),Jones,Casady (finally had the chance to tell him I always loved what he did on the "Guinevere" demo,AND "Have You Seen the Saucers/Mexico" single with JA)...Gene Dinwiddie (spelling???),crushed a ton of sessions in NYC!!!...Gordon Edwards works too!!!,just listen to "Stuff"...the aforementioned Tommy Cogbill played mostly guitar on those Aretha tunes,I honestly believe (played Tele,too!!!),BUT,the Dusty tunes were indeed Cogbill...all 'ya got to do is go to the credits/pix on the back of "Aretha' Gold" to see it was Jemmott on the "Retha tunes...love Danny Thompson's work with "Pentangle"...Phil Upchurch plays hella grooves on bass,as well as guitar...so many to know,so little time to know the truth...don't have to be well known to be influential,but how many people wish to dig???...

bluetele54
October 24th, 2007, 05:15 PM
...Steve Swallow's work on the "Gary Burton/Keith Jarrett" album "Como en Veitnam" is sooo musical...Sam Brown plays a ton of Tele on that record too!!!...Swallow plays a Gibson bass,and sounds like Jack Bruce with a deeper harmonic sense...

wierdOne
October 24th, 2007, 05:23 PM
I would say that Paul McCartney would probably be the most influential... after all.. his band basically defined 10 different genres of music and turned on millions of screaming young women, which ,in turn, inspired millions of single young guys to pick up instruments.....

giginthesky
October 24th, 2007, 05:29 PM
i see a lot of names here that i have to agree with so, i'm going to make it personal. bass players who have influenced me are flea, john taylor, pino palladino and dave gilmour. each of them have found their way into my playing style in one way or another.

bluetele54
October 24th, 2007, 05:32 PM
...went to the albums,and it is INDEED Tommy Cogbill on the aforementioned "Retha tunes...the Rick Hall studio (FAME) was where it was done...I figger the NYC tunes wer' Jemmott...so much info in my brain,that I oftimes forget the truth...so,all you Cogbill fans,desist your ire of me,as I fully accept responsibility for my Fo' Paw'!!!...

Pete Galati
October 24th, 2007, 05:34 PM
Jaco Pastorius is certainly mentioned in several posts on p.1 of this thread, and yes - I've heard of Steve Swallow.....:wink:

Oops... I didn't really check very closely I guess.

I'm mostly familiar with Steve Swallow because of the work he did with Carla Bley. Especially her "Social Studies" album.

CrazyManAndy
October 24th, 2007, 05:34 PM
A lot of people have already been mentioned, but on me personally, one of the most influential bassists has been Jeff Ament. And Tim Commerford too.

CMA

MandyMarie
October 24th, 2007, 05:37 PM
Bob Moore!

Pete Galati
October 24th, 2007, 05:41 PM
Hah... a littl of everything on youtube I guess

Carla Bley and Steve Swallow - Duets
CN0LKX4Sy94

KC
October 24th, 2007, 05:43 PM
I'm going to go along with Jamerson & Carol Kaye 100% but I also want to throw Bootsy Collins into the mix again, just because he was the first person I ever heard that had that popping, slapping style of bass. I'd be a little surprised if he was the person who originated it but he does seem like the person who really got it out there -- and this was a huge influence on how the instrument is played.

also because, you know, he's Bootsy!

howlin
October 24th, 2007, 06:08 PM
If thats the case then hands down Jaco transformed music in a similar way to what Miles did all the while playing the bass. Check out the analysis of Havona in a recent issue of Bass Player to get an idea of his influence and abilities.

If you're making a list of favorites thats a different tune altogether.

Montana_Dawg
October 24th, 2007, 07:20 PM
I don't know about influence on music in general, but I know who influenced me the most.

James Jamerson. I love the old Motown stuff, and I grew up with it. I also grew up with Elvis, Johnny, Carl, and Jerry Lee (my mom had all the original Sun albums). I always dug Bill Black's playing. I also liked Marshall Lytle of Bill Haley and the Comets.

For modern rock, it was the Ox (Entwistle) and JP Jones. Also, Tom Scholz did some mean bass playing on the Boston debut album.

One of my all time favorite bass players, though, is Henry Strzelecki. One of the top session bass players in Nashville from the 60s to the 90s. Name it, and he probably played on it.

Montana_Dawg
October 24th, 2007, 07:23 PM
Derek Smalls, Nigel Tufnel, and David St. Hubbins.

Big Bottom kicks "butt".

:lol: :lol: :lol:

celtobilly
October 24th, 2007, 07:39 PM
I'd suggest the guys who played on James Brown's mid-sixties stuff-- Bernard Odum, Sam Jones, and others-- belong on the list as well

tiktok
October 24th, 2007, 07:44 PM
The thing about Jamerson is that you can ask virtually any of the other "most influential" bassists about Jamerson and they'll say he influenced them. His impact was huge but he was never popularly famous.

Filthy McNasty
October 24th, 2007, 08:14 PM
Jimmy Blanton & Paul Chambers for jazz

Since the thread says influential and not best chops...
Bill Wyman & Dee Dee Ramone, every town that The Ramones played 20 bands would start up the next day. Seeing someone and saying "I can do that!" then going out and buying an instrument is an influence, maybe not what the thread starter had in mind but...

mudshark
October 24th, 2007, 08:30 PM
Donald "Duck" Dunn of Booker T. and the MGs

Teleblooz
October 24th, 2007, 08:58 PM
For my money, these are the most influential electric bassists. Everyone else seems to be doing some variation on the foundations that these bassists laid.

James Jamerson (and Carol Kaye)
Paul McCartney
Jack Bruce
Duck Dunn
Larry Graham
Jaco Pastorius
Stanley Clarke

Substitute John Entwistle for Jack Bruce and you've got it.

getbent
October 24th, 2007, 09:04 PM
+43 castigated

David Hood
Hillman

& my three most influentials
Chris "The Mountain" Whelan
Arnie "Wide Load" Moore
Randy Meisner

J-man
October 24th, 2007, 09:05 PM
Flea

I'd say the most influential in terms of making kids pick up a bass.

StuH
October 24th, 2007, 09:11 PM
I'm glad Steve Harris got a mention.

Maybe I'll have to read through a few times but where's Geddy Lee. One of the most influencial and incredibly melodic bassists bar none.

BellyBoy
October 24th, 2007, 09:34 PM
for me it would be
1. Barry Oakley
2. Jack Bruce
3. Jeff Berlin

but the two guys I could listen to all day are
Carl Radle and Kenny Tibbetts
Kenny's playing on Roy Buchanans "In the Beginning " album was so good ... so good...

daddyopapa
October 25th, 2007, 10:05 AM
Donald "Duck" Dunn of Booker T. and the MGs


+1 for me too. Think of all those Stax records with old Dunn and his solid groove.

Vincent Caster
October 25th, 2007, 10:33 AM
I don't know about influential, but we must not forget Rick Danko, one of the most "musical" bass players in rock music. He sure influenced me.......


I always got a kick out Toussaint saying that he could always pretty much peg people's influences and Danko left him totally perplexed.

Skully
October 25th, 2007, 10:42 AM
Since the thread says influential and not best chops...
Bill Wyman & Dee Dee Ramone, every town that The Ramones played 20 bands would start up the next day. Seeing someone and saying "I can do that!" then going out and buying an instrument is an influence, maybe not what the thread starter had in mind but...

Took the words right out of my mouth -- or from my keyboard. Or something like that.

I was discussing Wyman with someone the other day. I told him that his replacement Darryl Jones is technically a "better" bass player, and certainly more versatile, but he doesn't have that great jaunty sense of rhythm that Wyman has. In other words, Jones may be a better bass player for thousands of other bands, but Wyman is still the best bass player for the Stones.

jjlinus
October 25th, 2007, 11:32 AM
i remember Bill Wiman said the best was Duck Dunn

Mack
October 25th, 2007, 11:38 AM
I am first and foremost a... bass player.
These are the guys that take my breath away and to whom I pay homage at every opportunity.

Victor Wooten - technically flawless...
http://www.youtube.com/v/4dWb-aCWR8U (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4dWb-aCWR8U)

James Jamerson / Bob Babbitt - made bass melodic...
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vg8p2CsmU6Q

Flea - for introducing me to funk rock!
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZILSRswCNdE

Mak.

bilpfeiffer
October 25th, 2007, 07:56 PM
Ron Carter is up there as well as Monk Montgomery, Wes's brother,(who played a fender jazz very melodically on "the Montgomery Brothers LP"). Bil

Rocker AK
October 25th, 2007, 08:05 PM
Entwistle's not one I thought of, and I suppose John Paul Jones should be listed as influential to rock players a generation later too.

And while Clarke, Wooten, and Pastorious are amazing musicians, I don't think I'd list them as being particularly influential, except to a small sphere of other bass-player whiz kids. I'd judge their talent as similar to Gatton's on guitar. Most musicians can appreciate the technical merit, some can even play on that level, but the influence is confined to a very small group of people.

I bet John Paul Jones taught Jimmy Page a thing or two about musicianship. I'd say Stu Hamm and Geddy Lee have had a tremendous influence. Guys like Dave LaRue with Steve Morse blow me away; so does Geezer Butler.

Teleblooz
October 25th, 2007, 08:33 PM
I bet John Paul Jones taught Jimmy Page a thing or two about musicianship.

Debatable. Both Page and Jonesy were pretty seasoned pros by the time the Zep was launched. Bonzo & Percy, on the other hand, were "hicks from the sticks".