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IF You Were Going Solid State..

Wyzsard
January 2nd, 2012, 11:21 PM
If you were going to use a solid state amp for whatever reason, what specs/features etc. would you require ? What would you avoid ?

Name a specific ss model if you like, but what does it have that does it for you.

danieljaypark
January 2nd, 2012, 11:25 PM
Almost anything Peavey or a Yamaha G100 II. Great cleans, just a bit more sterile than tube.

07 road house
January 2nd, 2012, 11:28 PM
just get a mustang they have it all

Delta Blues
January 2nd, 2012, 11:29 PM
Peavey and Fender both make some good SS stuff.

SamClemons
January 2nd, 2012, 11:34 PM
The Fender and Marshal Chorus amps are pretty nice. Princeton Chorus for example.

tele_jas
January 3rd, 2012, 12:01 AM
Tech 21 or the ZT lunchbox amps.

vjf1968
January 3rd, 2012, 12:05 AM
I have played through

Roland JC120-Great amp with a killer chorus and vibrato that can give you a Leslie type effect. Great for keyboards and electric-acoustic guitars too. DO NOT USE THE BULIT IN DISTORTION.

ZT Lunchbox and Club-I currently own both but after getting the matching cab for the Lunchbox and I may sell the Club. The Club has a nice tone for Jazz and efx loop but I rarely use it these days. The Lunchbox stack gives a great tone.

The Roland Cube line is also pretty good.

I would like to try Pritchard amps.

Peavy Nashville and Session 400. Loud and clean. Hey, Jerry Reed used a Session 400 and Redd Volkaert uses a Nashville 400 and a LTD 400 IIRC.

TheSmokingMan
January 3rd, 2012, 12:08 AM
old kustom solid state amps

Ian
January 3rd, 2012, 12:13 AM
I've got an old GK 250ML that I really dig. I've used it for 2 gigs,and as a practice amp. It works well with my new hollowbody, and it's now become my "Jazz amp".

07 road house
January 3rd, 2012, 12:17 AM
old kustom solid state amps

Fogarty got great tone from one but , not sure how. My father in law has one and it sounds ok sometimes but bad lots of times:grin:

twangster2
January 3rd, 2012, 12:17 AM
Roland JC120, there is a reason it ia used on tons of albums and live. But you better have a strong back.

Peavey Bandit, killer 112 combo

Wyzsard
January 3rd, 2012, 12:34 AM
Thanks for the replies. I have access to several models mentioned here.

This one is what I'm considering. I can get a somewhat minty one cheap, complete with f/switch
http://www.peavey.com/assets/literature/manuals/80370411.pdf

I play acoustic as well, and this one looks tempting.

caliban335
January 3rd, 2012, 12:35 AM
Vox Pathfinder 15R does it all.

Great tone
Low enough wattage for home/practice
Headphone output
Tremolo and reverb
High enough wattage to gig
$120 USD new

I don't work for Vox.

TheGoodTexan
January 3rd, 2012, 01:33 AM
As mentioned in a different thread, are you specifically wanting a digital modeling amp, or an analog amp?

I've been a HUGE fan of the old Randall RG series amps for years, and I own an RG-80 (80w, 1x12 combo) and it's big brother RG-100? (100w, 4x10 combo). These are from approximately 1980.

These are the amps that Dimebag Darrell used for his heavy crunch tone, but that's not what I use them for. The overdrive sound more like a Warren Haynes or Billy Gibbons tone to me. But they have a glorious and huge clean tone with more headroom than you can imagine. The punch that they have is amazing. And if you've ever played a Voodoo Lab Sparkle Drive pedal, which has the ability to blend clean and overdrive tones... the RG series do this with the two channels. You can blend the two channels, and even engage that via the footswitch.

The coolest thing? I got the RG-80 for $90 (in 2001). And I got the RG-100 for $120 (in 2010).

To be sure, I still use my old Alamo tube amp a lot. But I also use my Randall amps a lot. These things can be found sleeping away in pawn shops across America, and many of them come stock with original Celestion speakers (mine did). I've got an original G12-80 in my RG-80.

If you ever see one, check it out.

guitar dan
January 3rd, 2012, 01:43 AM
Almost anything Peavey or a Yamaha G100 II. Great cleans, just a bit more sterile than tube.

I never thought I'd see someone else taking about the Yamaha. I have a G100 112 that I bought for about $225 years ago. I bought it when I was in music school and I needed an amp to play in the big band that would stay clean...and I had to wheel this thing all over campus. It's built like a tank. It's not my favorite amp, but I've used it on all kind of gigs in a pinch. The cleans do sound good, but not warm like a tube amp. My OD & distortion pedals work with it (they do sound better on a tube amp). You have to be more careful matching solid state with your OD/distoriton pedals. Some of them just don't sound that good paired up.

There are some good players that have gotten good tone from solid state. I think Ray Flacke used solid state Lab Series if I'm not mistaken.

jh45gun
January 3rd, 2012, 02:12 AM
Peavey Bandit you just cannot go wrong with one.

No457 Snowy
January 3rd, 2012, 02:13 AM
I was pleasantly surprised when I played through a Tech21 Trademark 60, that amp did a very respectable job I thought.

Snowy

Flakey
January 3rd, 2012, 02:16 AM
Roland cube 60 is easy to dial in. Vintage type; any Lab Series but the Lab Series L5 is a favorite among the SS amps

Warren Pederson
January 3rd, 2012, 02:16 AM
Peavey and Fender both make some good SS stuff.

Peavey Bandit rules the solid state world (the new ones are real good). I absolutely abhor Fender's solid state amps...until the Mustang Series. The Peavey Bandit can sound great but it can sound awful too. I only use the clean channel/25%/loose speaker setting or the (have to go look what they call it) lowest drive setting. You can still crank that pre setting but the beauty of the Bandit is that the power section will crunch. The clean channel can get creamy wicked. Of course you can crank out the 100% setting and use an extension cab to crank out 100 watts. I use the ext speaker purely because I have it.

jh45gun
January 3rd, 2012, 03:08 AM
Peavey Bandit rules the solid state world (the new ones are real good). I absolutely abhor Fender's solid state amps...until the Mustang Series. The Peavey Bandit can sound great but it can sound awful too. I only use the clean channel/25%/loose speaker setting or the (have to go look what they call it) lowest drive setting. You can still crank that pre setting but the beauty of the Bandit is that the power section will crunch. The clean channel can get creamy wicked. Of course you can crank out the 100% setting and use an extension cab to crank out 100 watts. I use the ext speaker purely because I have it.

Mine is the Teal Stripe the one before the Transtube versions even though it has some of the electronics in it just does not have that adjustable stuff to mimic tube saturation. Still it is a great amp and I do not even use the distortion channel I use the clean channel when I use it with one of my RP Digitech pedals for dirt.

garytelecastor
January 3rd, 2012, 03:16 AM
Fender Mustang or Roland Cube.

I have used a Roland Cube 60 for the last several years and it has always filled the bill.
It has a really clean top end, it is very portable, and I always have players coming up to me after the gig telling me they like my tone.

The Mustang has been getting some positive press though it probably is a little more designed for Rock.

Warren Pederson
January 3rd, 2012, 03:18 AM
Oh ya...forgot about the Roland Cube sries they are great.

TeleTim911
January 3rd, 2012, 03:27 AM
I have two SS amps that I use exclusively...A Vox VT50, and a Peavey Bandit. There is nothing wrong with SS amps.

I've played thousands of gigs with SS amps....the audience couldn't care less.

Piotr
January 3rd, 2012, 05:52 AM
With my Award/Session JD-10 I get a decent sound going into any solid-state amp or PA.

And the ultimate recent TDPRI solid-state thread is here :cool:
Rethinking Solid State (http://www.tdpri.com/forum/amp-central-station/280094-rethinking-solid-state.html)

studio1087
January 3rd, 2012, 08:55 AM
Vox Pathfinder 15R does it all.

Great tone
Low enough wattage for home/practice
Headphone output
Tremolo and reverb
High enough wattage to gig
$120 USD new

I don't work for Vox.

+1

Carvin SX Series for more power.

3 Chord
January 3rd, 2012, 08:59 AM
+1

Carvin SX Series for more power.

+1

benderb9
January 3rd, 2012, 09:05 AM
I just got a little VOX mini3 with the classic grill ect and it is amazing how good it sounds. Great cleans/distortion models and nice built in effects. Also has a mic input and come with the power supply but can run on 6 AA batteries. Tiny to pack n run, or play someplace I normally wouldn't, sounds decent through a mic into a PA as well. $99.99 is hard to beat...the Pathfinder for slightly more is a bargin too, I've run that into a 4x10" and been plenty loud enough and had excellent tone. Guess I gravitate to VOX anymore for the SS stuff, but I've had Silvertones, Kustom, Ampegs, Crate, Marshalls, Fenders and Peavy's too in the past. They're gone the VOX'es remain.

brookdalebill
January 3rd, 2012, 09:08 AM
Cubes, Bandits, Tech 21s, Tube Works (hybrid), Marshall MGs, Lab series,
and most Yamahas leap to mind.
I have been a Cube nut for about 6 years now.

FMA
January 3rd, 2012, 09:12 AM
In my book, it's hard to beat a Tech 21 Trademark 60 for SS tone.
I also use a ZT Lunchbox for smaller gigs, grab-and-go situations and rehearsals. Great sounding amp and has enough power to be useful in just about any situation. Every guitar player should have one.

Michel347
January 3rd, 2012, 09:28 AM
I really like my Cube 40XL, it is easy and simple to use. I can dial great tones from clean, light crunch, old school rock to modern distortion. The delay and reverbs are really nice. On the minus side the modulation effects can be useful but I don't find them great.

Jakedog
January 3rd, 2012, 10:08 AM
LOVE my Roland Cube 60. The new(er) COSM version.

I gig the snot out of it.

Still love my tube amps too, but this little Roland box just cooks.

Also, big love from me for both the Peavey Bandit (I prefer the Red Stripe TT over all others, but the black/silver TT is a GREAT amp as well).

Also big love for the Carvin SX series. The SX 200 is my favorite. A 100 Watt 2X12 with a GREAT clean channel, and surprisingly (for ANY amp, SS or tube) it has a great sounding drive channel as well. And portability? Yeah, it's a 2X12 so it's kinda big, but at only around 30 pounds, VERY easy to move around.

Both the Roland and the Carvin have useable FX. Not great FX, but useable for sure. The Carvin has better 'verb I think. Also, using the Carvin's footswitch, you can set and recall one effect for each channel. Pretty cool feature.

aunchaki
January 3rd, 2012, 10:14 AM
Roland JC120, there is a reason it ia used on tons of albums and live. But you better have a strong back.

Peavey Bandit, killer 112 combo

^ This.

Tony474
January 3rd, 2012, 10:22 AM
No-one seems to have answered the OP's first question, about what features may be required or avoided. Actually, that's tricky because everyone has their own wants and needs and what one user would like, someone else might wish to avoid. However, I can only answer for myself, so here goes:

The obvious first requirement is a good sound (Duh!). It's very difficult to describe in words but I know what I like when I hear it. I've discovered through experience that what sounds great indoors may not work so well in a gig situation, so I've learnt what to listen for in order to assess how the tonality will come out in different situations. A decent range of adjustability in the low, mid and high frequency bands is pretty useful - particularly the important midrange frequencies. I've come to recognise a certain "character" - again, hard to define - that appeals to me.

Unlike some players, I don't have much (or indeed any) use for a high-gain distorted channel in my amp, so I'm happy with a single channel that can go from totally clean to maybe just a little pushed near the very top of the volume control's sweep. All the same, clean headroom is an important factor for me. A good built-in reverb is handy but I don't need any other built-in effects as I have all the ones I need in outboard units. Similarly, I personally have no need of multiple amp simulations - I chose each of my amps to sound like itself; why would I want it to sound like a different one? Besides, whatever I play through I generally wind up sounding exactly like me anyway.

Now all of the above comments could apply to any amp, not just solid state, but some of the SS ones that work particularly well for me are these:

Tech 21 Trademark 60, with speaker upgrade to Celestion G12K-100 (possibly my favourite of all my amps);
Roland Cube 60 (most gigged of my amps);
Roland BC-60 Blues Cube 1x12 (I used to own the 3x10 as well);
Lab Series L3, with speaker upgrade to Celestion G12H-100.

The first three do have some of the features I said I don't need, but better to have something and not need it than the other way around.

I've had some nice Peavey, Yamaha and Sessionette SS amps in the past, while I currently own a few other amps as well as the ones I've listed above. But those are the ones I have no hesitation in recommending to anyone who asks.

jmcfender1
January 3rd, 2012, 10:26 AM
If I had to go back to SS I'd go get another Bandit 112. great little work horse amp. I had one for 20 years before I sold for $75 and it sounded just as good if not better than when it was new.

jmiles
January 3rd, 2012, 03:54 PM
Lab. Had one with a 15. Great for Tele and Pedal steel. Sounded like a tube amp with extra headroom. Miss it! Using a split Twin with a 15 now.

Timbertea
January 3rd, 2012, 04:01 PM
In terms of live performance I was always happiest with the Roland JC-120, JC-77, and JC-50 when I had that. Except for the time I had to go down the stairs in the ice carrying the JC-120 ... Casters don't help with stairs. The Roland Cube series has a couple good amps in it, and those wont endanger you as much in the above scenario.

I've heard good sounding Yamaha solid states.

I had a Peavey Bandit that was a good amp, but then I also had one of those transtube amps that was terrible live (because I DO need a 2nd channel with some gain).

Jimclarke100
January 3rd, 2012, 04:06 PM
Admittedly, I've not played one, but I'd be tempted to look at the Hiwatt G100R.
A year or so back over here this won the best amp under 1000 in one of the UK magazines (The Guitar Magazine IIRR) - beating valve amps into 2nd and 3rd places.
Given that it's gotta be worth a try.

hwy145
January 3rd, 2012, 05:28 PM
Evan je200- great solid state amp. I loved it for loud country cleans. Took pedals well too.

Telesavalis
January 3rd, 2012, 05:49 PM
I'd go back to using my Lab L7.
Good solid build, clean SS signal and loves pedals.

BlueJazzDay
January 3rd, 2012, 05:55 PM
I'll go with the Pathfinder 15R too, but will admit to not trying many of the others mentioned yet. Even though my collection has now grown to include some more expensive and exotic amps, the Pathfinder is like an old friend that never lets me down.

pondcaster
January 3rd, 2012, 06:13 PM
Vox Pathfinder 15R does it all.

Great tone
Low enough wattage for home/practice
Headphone output
Tremolo and reverb
High enough wattage to gig
$120 USD new

I don't work for Vox.

^^ THIS ^^

Bongocaster
January 3rd, 2012, 06:18 PM
I found some usable dirt from my Bandit 75 the other day when I didn't daisy chain it to my AC4 TV 10".

I use to use one of those DOD overdrive pedals to goose some good dirt out of my old Yamaha G100 212 II way back when as well.

Maybe there is something wrong with me:razz::shock::grin:

DuncanAngus
January 3rd, 2012, 06:38 PM
I have an old Yamaha G100-212-II that I really like. Some thoughts on it...

Made in USA, I believe someplace in GA, but I'd have to drag it out to check.

It's LOUD. Did I say loud? Loud isn't always good, but this is loud.

The parametriq EQ is nice to have, but not really required. Has great tone adjustability with the tone knobs alone.

Great for clean Jazz, micing in an acoustic, takes pedals fairly well. Drippy, drippy reverb (or not, depending). Guy next door playes crazy metal music and he LOVES the thing. He can dial it in so that his Pointy Guitar screams.

Heavy. I wouldn't toss it down a flight of stairs, but I think it'd still play after if you decided to.

Wyzsard
January 3rd, 2012, 09:37 PM
No-one seems to have answered the OP's first question, about what features may be required or avoided. Actually, that's tricky because everyone has their own wants and needs and what one user would like, someone else might wish to avoid. However, I can only answer for myself, so here goes:

The obvious first requirement is a good sound (Duh!). It's very difficult to describe in words but I know what I like when I hear it. I've discovered through experience that what sounds great indoors may not work so well in a gig situation, so I've learnt what to listen for in order to assess how the tonality will come out in different situations. A decent range of adjustability in the low, mid and high frequency bands is pretty useful - particularly the important midrange frequencies. I've come to recognise a certain "character" - again, hard to define - that appeals to me.

Unlike some players, I don't have much (or indeed any) use for a high-gain distorted channel in my amp, so I'm happy with a single channel that can go from totally clean to maybe just a little pushed near the very top of the volume control's sweep. All the same, clean headroom is an important factor for me. A good built-in reverb is handy but I don't need any other built-in effects as I have all the ones I need in outboard units. Similarly, I personally have no need of multiple amp simulations - I chose each of my amps to sound like itself; why would I want it to sound like a different one? Besides, whatever I play through I generally wind up sounding exactly like me anyway.

Now all of the above comments could apply to any amp, not just solid state, but some of the SS ones that work particularly well for me are these:

Tech 21 Trademark 60, with speaker upgrade to Celestion G12K-100 (possibly my favourite of all my amps);
Roland Cube 60 (most gigged of my amps);
Roland BC-60 Blues Cube 1x12 (I used to own the 3x10 as well);
Lab Series L3, with speaker upgrade to Celestion G12H-100.

The first three do have some of the features I said I don't need, but better to have something and not need it than the other way around.

I've had some nice Peavey, Yamaha and Sessionette SS amps in the past, while I currently own a few other amps as well as the ones I've listed above. But those are the ones I have no hesitation in recommending to anyone who asks.

thanks :wink:

danieljaypark
January 4th, 2012, 12:04 AM
Anything labeled line 6 is something I would stay far far away from. The only good use I found for them are as furniture and they don't even do that job right cause they are so damn fugly and all flashing and blinking light make my noggin go numb as hell.

777Brad
January 4th, 2012, 12:14 AM
I have a Roland Cube 60 that is very nice. It compares favorably to my tube amps.

cactusrob
January 4th, 2012, 12:14 AM
I usually go tube, except on Sundays at church and then I use a Vox Pathfinder 15R. I come out of the line out into the direct box to the house and the amp is my monitor on stage.
It works great and sounds even better. Simple controls. I don't like the little push-button gain boost at all but the tremolo and reverb are substantial. Nothing cheesy about them at all. It sounds great clean or crunchy. Cheap, too! I paid 99 bucks for mine. :cool:

http://i1037.photobucket.com/albums/a458/cactusrob-4tdpri/101_1262.jpg

Mike Simpson
January 4th, 2012, 12:23 AM
Gibson Lab 5

Brandon mac
January 4th, 2012, 12:33 AM
for me,a solid state has to have a great clean tone and be loud enough to gig with a loud drummer. my pedalboard will go in front for any of my other needs. my solo series peavey bandit 65 fits all this for me,and sounds great as a practice rig. i wouldnt even hesitate to gig with it if needed.

Controller
January 4th, 2012, 01:05 PM
I usually go tube, except on Sundays at church and then I use a Vox Pathfinder 15R. I come out of the line out into the direct box to the house and the amp is my monitor on stage.
It works great and sounds even better. Simple controls. I don't like the little push-button gain boost at all but the tremolo and reverb are substantial. Nothing cheesy about them at all. It sounds great clean or crunchy. Cheap, too! I paid 99 bucks for mine. :cool:

http://i1037.photobucket.com/albums/a458/cactusrob-4tdpri/101_1262.jpg

+1

Bongocaster
January 4th, 2012, 01:50 PM
I have an old Yamaha G100-212-II that I really like. Some thoughts on it...

Made in USA, I believe someplace in GA, but I'd have to drag it out to check.

It's LOUD. Did I say loud? Loud isn't always good, but this is loud.

The parametriq EQ is nice to have, but not really required. Has great tone adjustability with the tone knobs alone.

Great for clean Jazz, micing in an acoustic, takes pedals fairly well. Drippy, drippy reverb (or not, depending). Guy next door playes crazy metal music and he LOVES the thing. He can dial it in so that his Pointy Guitar screams.

Heavy. I wouldn't toss it down a flight of stairs, but I think it'd still play after if you decided to.

The full parametric ruled. I still wonder why you don't see it more. Pick a frequency, pick the width of that frequency, boost it or cut it. Don't want it? Put the cut/boost on zero and it's out of the loop.

Take that and make it foot switchable in or out. That would be cool.

If I found another G100 II at a good price it would sure be hard to resist.

Stevie boy
January 4th, 2012, 04:17 PM
There is only one. Spend the money and be done.
Evans JE-200.

WildcatTele
January 4th, 2012, 05:05 PM
I've had a red knob Fender Deluxe 85 since about 1990. It was my main amp for quite some time until I got a real job and could afford a Twin. Granted it's no BF Deluxe, but the clean channel has a lot of headroom and the gain channel isn't horrible if you (ironically) don't turn it up too loud. It has a couple of cool features; namely the "Limiter" dial that doesn't really "Limit" anything, but does tweak the tone a bit, and the ability to combine the clean and gain channels. Not overly useful, but interesting to play around with.

JohnSS
January 4th, 2012, 05:43 PM
I've found that a lot of guitar players who disdain SS don't take the time to tweak the setting on an SS amp for optimum sound. They plug in and set the knobs the same way that they would on a Marshall and then complain that the amp doesn't sound as good as tubes! I interviewed Steve Howe for www.guitargearheads.com and he swears by his Line 6 Vettas because he's taken the time to program his sounds for optimum matching with some of the guitars form his amazing collection.

I myself own a tube Music Man 210HD as well as SS Peavey Vypyr, a Bandit 65, a couple of small transtubes, a 70's Yamaha G30112, a Cube, an Epiphone EP800R, Behringer, GX110, a Dwarf and a Crate BX-80 bass amp. I use them all, but that's because over the years, I now know how to tweak them to get their maximum sound performance with my guitars. I've never had luck with a Marshall and would readily take a SS Peavey XXL or H&K Warp 7 over a Marshall stack, just because I can more readily get my sounds from them. But that's me.

Tony474
January 4th, 2012, 05:43 PM
I've had a red knob Fender Deluxe 85 since about 1990. It was my main amp for quite some time...

As it happens, in addition to the amps I mentioned earlier, I also have a solid state Fender Deluxe, in my case the slightly later 112 Plus model, and like you I used to use it as my main working amp. Pretty good and unsurprisingly Fenderish clean sounds, and I never used the overdrive channel much anyway. However, once I'd bought the Tech 21 Trademark 60 the Fender was "retired". Good as it is, there's something in it I can't quite define which makes it less than totally satisfying for me to use. Maybe it would benefit from a speaker upgrade. It's still a very nice amp; it's just that I find others better.

Jake D
January 4th, 2012, 05:45 PM
I've got a Line 6 Spider III 75 watt that I get some pretty surprising tones from. It has admittedly way too many features. But if you can find a tone within the 300 presets you like, you can stick with it. Or you can dail your own tones and save them to one of the 16 memory banks. Or you can turn two knobs and change your tone totally (Gain and Reverb), and Bob's your Uncle.

2much
January 4th, 2012, 06:37 PM
I have a Roland BC-60, (Blues Cube 60) which is very flexible and sounds great distorted, clean, and works well with most pedals. It is very durable and as someone once said, you could throw this down the stairs and it would probably be ok.

It has, a clean and lead channel, reverb, footswitch, an effects loop and two sets of eq that really work, and is loud. It can sound Fenderish, or fat like a Marshall, however, it doesnt exactly sound tubish. When you play it wide open it has its own compression that sounds really good. This amp is not to be mistaken as a plain Roland Cube 60. It looks like a Fender Tweed amp covered in beige tolex:

http://www.rolandus.com/products/productdetails.php?ProductId=247

Oh, and it is analog, not digital. They are not made anymore but can be found used.

I would stay away from the digital stuff for now.

Marky D.
January 4th, 2012, 06:55 PM
I really like the Peavey Solo Series Special 130.. my brother picked one up real cheap from a garage sale. I borrowed it and was surprised by the sound. Gave him $100 for it..then sold it. I found that I missed it and bought another for $125 on Craigslist.

What I like is that it's bulletproof, reliable, has a parametric EQ that allows me to dial in a scooped Deluxe Reverb tone (I use the dirty channel with the saturation off). The reverb is passable - sometimes I use a EH Holy Grail with it. With a Fulltone OCD or Boss DS-1 I can go from clean to Kossoff-like roar using the volume control on a Tele. I have a few nice tube amps, but I really like having this one around for practices, outside gigs, or when I need something portable with some headroom for unmiked gigs. It's nice to have enough headroom to do a big 'ol volume swell when ya need to!

I didn't care for the Batman logo on this era of Peavey but I'm learning to like it because the amp sounds so good.

e-merlin
January 4th, 2012, 07:37 PM
I wish Peavey would put out a straight SS amp based on the Vypyr. The Vypyr has the best SS cleans I've ever heard. Of course, the effects package is pretty cool, too, but I'd rather have the two separate.

Tele-phone man
January 4th, 2012, 07:38 PM
for me,a solid state has to have a great clean tone and be loud enough to gig with a loud drummer. my pedalboard will go in front for any of my other needs. my solo series peavey bandit 65 fits all this for me,and sounds great as a practice rig. i wouldnt even hesitate to gig with it if needed.

+1
This is my formula, exactly. I use my tube amps the same way. All I ask for is a great clean tone with adequate headroom. MINIMUM 60W SS (I prefer 100W) or 30W tube (I prefer 50 or 60W). When you don't need to be pushing a tube amp to its limits to get your tone, you can actually turn down when needed (and I OFTEN have to play quietly) and still sound like yourself.

Jazzerstang
January 4th, 2012, 07:40 PM
Vox Pathfinder 15R does it all.

Great tone
Low enough wattage for home/practice
Headphone output
Tremolo and reverb
High enough wattage to gig
$120 USD new

I don't work for Vox.

+1

I had one in college. I wish I still had it, but high enough wattage to gig? I don't agree, unless it is mic'd up. Depends on the room/music style I guess. Maybe it's been so long since I have played one. They really are superior amps.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UWEFNbPzmH8&feature=related

Tele-phone man
January 4th, 2012, 07:43 PM
The full parametric ruled. I still wonder why you don't see it more. Pick a frequency, pick the width of that frequency, boost it or cut it. Don't want it? Put the cut/boost on zero and it's out of the loop.

Take that and make it foot switchable in or out. That would be cool.

If I found another G100 II at a good price it would sure be hard to resist.

The Yamaha G100 series III models had a foot-switchable full parametric. They sounded different than the series II (the power amp had a different design), but they were excellent in their own right. Lead channel sucked, but you had amazing, high-headroom cleans available. I still own and use a G100112III. Superb stock speakers; you don't need to "upgrade" unless they are damaged.

Jazzerstang
January 4th, 2012, 07:54 PM
more vox pathfinder content

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v696eqG9E-w&feature=related

Jazzerstang
January 4th, 2012, 08:05 PM
darn, now I want my old amp back.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tRaFKkv57Eo&feature=related

jomazq
January 4th, 2012, 08:14 PM
Vox Pathfinder 15R does it all.

Great tone
Low enough wattage for home/practice
Headphone output
Tremolo and reverb
High enough wattage to gig
$120 USD new

I don't work for Vox.

+1

i removed the LED's in mine. it is now officially too loud for the apartment

WireLine
January 5th, 2012, 09:13 AM
Remember Pearce amps? They were pretty decent, really. As for power sections, I really like(d) the Mosvalve 962 with a BlueTube II pre - great combo (aside from the sreaming yellow letters)

Tony474
January 5th, 2012, 10:37 AM
Remember Pearce amps? They were pretty decent, really.

I think Dan Pearce was involved in the design of the Lab Series amps made by Robert Moog's company and marketed through Gibson outlets. My old L3 is a great amp and the bigger models (L5, etc.) are very highly spoken of. Pearce amps as such are extremely rare in the UK - I've never seen one but I do remember a favourable review or two.

Zappledan
January 5th, 2012, 10:49 AM
I have an old Polytone MiniBrute IV with a 15" speaker - Keeley compressor and Hermida Zendrive in front. Great sound. I have a hard time beating its tone with my tube amps.

jazztele
January 5th, 2012, 11:07 AM
If?:mrgreen:

I'd use a good solid state amp that was good at delivering what a solid state amp does best. Loud, transparent clean, and in a small package. I'd want a good EQ, I'd avoid a little button labeled "distortion."

Modeling tech has gotten pretty good, but it's often still a SS amp doing an impression of a tube amp. When it's a good impression, that's very cool (like the cubes, which also do good SS cleans), but i prefer my solid state amps to do the stuff my tube amp can't.

marshman
January 6th, 2012, 01:04 AM
I don't know what it's called, but it's a Vox. Mike Armstrong (member here, Tims' brother, guitarist for the Moodswingers) gigs one and it sounds outDAMNEDstanding, make no mistake.

The standard caveats about Mikes' fingers and such apply, but if you told me that I was gonna have to gig SS for the rest of my life, I'd go buy 2 of 'em and be done.

strat_tone
January 6th, 2012, 03:02 AM
-Two Channels
-Full Sized Reverb Pan
-Luscious Vibrato
-200 watts
-pair of vintage eminence 12's
-open back
-55 lbs, factory caster wheels
-takes pedals / pods well
-high/low gain switch (high gain is pure blues, not a metal bone in it's body)

Don't know what else I could ask for. Maybe a Middle knob. Maybe.

Aka my '71 Standel. Took a chance and loving every tone of it. Loud, loud, loud.

Stevie boy
January 7th, 2012, 01:04 PM
There is only one. Evans JE-200.....

chrom-freak
January 7th, 2012, 09:04 PM
i still love to play through my vox da5 every now and then. amazing what comes out there if you crank the clean 1 preset on 0.5 watts. also love the heavier g'n'r stuff you can get out of it.

Kmld89
January 8th, 2012, 02:56 AM
Picked this up recently. Fantastic amp for $150. Rich warm and dynamic cleans. Lush optical trem and deep fenderesque spring reverb. Basically a SS Twin. A great amp and built like a tank. I think the model is a Randall RG-80. The front plate reads "Commander II".http://a7.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash4/390154_10150680799308989_680188988_12281120_116304 3901_n.jpg
Ignore the adorable furball

Wyzsard
January 8th, 2012, 03:18 AM
Picked this up recently. Fantastic amp for $150. Rich warm and dynamic cleans. Lush optical trem and deep fenderesque spring reverb. Basically a SS Twin. A great amp and built like a tank. I think the model is a Randall RG-80. The front plate reads "Commander II".http://a7.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash4/390154_10150680799308989_680188988_12281120_116304 3901_n.jpg
Ignore the adorable furball

I found a Commander IV w/4x10's on craigslist about 2 years ago. I paid less than yours, but mine wasn't nearly as clean as your looks there. Tremolo didn't work. Same deal, Randall's ss Super Reverb.

Nice amp, but after moving it around a few times it did feel like a tank, so I sold it.

Bongocaster
January 8th, 2012, 09:54 AM
There is only one. Evans JE-200.....

Hey Steve. What do you think about those Evans amps? Are they any good? What about the JE-200?:wink:

popthree
January 8th, 2012, 10:56 AM
I have a Randall rg60 that i got on CL I forget what I paid ....I think $40 :-) its clean looking and sounding. I got rid of a hrd and a bj . This amp has a great clean tone...gets loud enough to play with a full band...takes my pedals very well...and is pretty easy to haul around.

Oakville Dave
January 8th, 2012, 11:00 AM
I HAVE gone solid state, and LOVE the Mustang III, a very nice amp that is definitely gig worthy.

GrantR
January 12th, 2012, 05:02 AM
Well I - like others here, are really happy with my Peavey Bandit (new model) and my Cube 40XL. These two SS amps cover the clean to warm sounds that I like. I think they are both really great amps. Both keepers.

However . . . I'm always tempted by 'new mistresses' . . . and am currently looking at / listening to Vox Valvetronix amps (AD120VTX, VT100, VT120+, etc . . . and Zoom G3 processors . . . I'm a gear junkie / slapper . . . always looking for nice clean / warmish tones . . .

I am tempted to try a Mustang IV out again too. I really 'want' to like them . . . :confused: :mrgreen:

entresz
January 16th, 2012, 04:02 AM
If I could only use SS, it would need to be an amp with huge clean headroom, and a fairly warm tone. Something like a Roland JC120 (or even better.... a Roland JC200 head, paired with two 212 cabinets in stereo), or a Acoustic 270 head w/the matching cab..... then use pedals for effects/gain etc.

GrantR
January 16th, 2012, 04:17 AM
Well . . . I succumbed to temptation and bought a Mustang IV. I "borrowed" the amp for a few days first - on trial from my local store.
I found quite a lot of the presets are totally useless to me (as is often the case with manufacturer presets IME), but if you spend some time 'building' an amp tone from scratch, there certainly are some very nice sounds to be had.
For me - so far, I am enjoying the sounds from the Fender twin reverb 65, and a Bassman. I'm sure I will find more sounds I like. With those two amps, setting them up from the start, - they sound exactly like the real amps - to my ears. I think that's pretty good. Lots of bells and whistles available, and a lot more to tweak via computer, to really get into an amp or an effect, and fine tune it to the nth degree.
The two 12" speakers sound pretty good. I'm sure there will be people that will replace them to get even better sounds.
But after trying one previously, and just simply going off the presets, I was not that impressed. I think with any of these types of amps, you have to be able to take the time to experiment, to find the sounds you enjoy.
So far . . . so good !! :-)

TimW
January 16th, 2012, 05:06 AM
I've just been on this merry go round, just sold my Mustang 3 cos I wanted to go back to all analog. Found a Peavey Bandit 65!! "87 model I believe. I love real clean and just on edge sound that Brad Paisley has, I cant afford a bunch of Dr Z's but with the Bandit, a Boss CS3 and Aqua Puss delay, I can get pretty close with just a bit of saturation dialed in on the lead channel. I now have a Wampler Paisley Drive on the way and I reckon I'll be done.
I think amps and tone are really subjective , it all depends on what sound you are trying to get.. I have now found my sound! YMMV
Cheers
Tim

GrantR
January 16th, 2012, 05:14 AM
I've just been on this merry go round, just sold my Mustang 3 cos I wanted to go back to all analog. Found a Peavey Bandit 65!! "87 model I believe. I love real clean and just on edge sound that Brad Paisley has, I cant afford a bunch of Dr Z's but with the Bandit, a Boss CS3 and Aqua Puss delay, I can get pretty close with just a bit of saturation dialed in on the lead channel. I now have a Wampler Paisley Drive on the way and I reckon I'll be done.
I think amps and tone are really subjective , it all depends on what sound you are trying to get.. I have now found my sound! YMMV
Cheers
Tim

I totally agree about amp choice and tone being totally subjective. It comes down to what YOU like. It's great we don't all like the same thing - that would be really boring !! I'm pleased you've found your sound. You can get into enjoying your playing and getting 'your sound'. It's got to be good !!
Cheers.

popthree
January 16th, 2012, 11:55 AM
big difference, IMO, between solid state & modeling

to me 'going solid state' means analog solid state... digital modeling is another matter entirely.

Tony474
January 16th, 2012, 12:28 PM
big difference, IMO, between solid state & modeling

to me 'going solid state' means analog solid state... digital modeling is another matter entirely.

Well, yes and no... For example, the Roland Cubes are actually digital modelling amps, but they're really straightforward to use; you just select the voice you want and go ahead and play just as with any other amp. On the other hand, I can understand any initial apprehension when being confronted with the huge range of options seemingly offered by many digital modellers. All the same, once the user has chosen the preferred settings, the signal is then passed to a regular power stage, which is usually analogue solid state, although some modelling amps have a valve (tube) power amp section.

So, while I know what you mean, I do think it's reasonable to consider some digital modellers alongside all-analogue designs.

jammers5
January 16th, 2012, 01:29 PM
If you were going to use a solid state amp for whatever reason, what specs/features etc. would you require ? What would you avoid ?

Name a specific ss model if you like, but what does it have that does it for you.

I just bought a Fender G-Dec 3 30. Its an AWESOME rehearsal tool and the tones are actually quite nice. I simply download backing tracks of songs I am learning or rehearsing onto an SD card, put the SD card into my amp and play along! It really teaches you to be aware of timing - playing along to songs with the guitar parts in there can make you "lazy" to timing somewhat.

Other features include a 2nd guitar input at the back, great for two guitarist rehearsing together, and makes it a great tool for guitar teachers! Also a pair of line outs to send to a PA, and a jack for the optional footswitch.

All the preset amp mods are editable, including the effects, both on the amp, or with the included Fender Fuse software. I don't have a lot of knowledge on th fuse software yet, but apparently it's packed with features as well.

You can record lead over the included backing tracks (or make your own) but havent played with that yet either.

J5

popthree
January 17th, 2012, 01:01 PM
Well, yes and no... For example, the Roland Cubes are actually digital modelling amps, but they're really straightforward to use; you just select the voice you want and go ahead and play just as with any other amp. On the other hand, I can understand any initial apprehension when being confronted with the huge range of options seemingly offered by many digital modellers. All the same, once the user has chosen the preferred settings, the signal is then passed to a regular power stage, which is usually analogue solid state, although some modelling amps have a valve (tube) power amp section.

So, while I know what you mean, I do think it's reasonable to consider some digital modellers alongside all-analogue designs.

yeah i suppose its all sort of blending together... convergence...

my (non technical as far as amplifier architecture goes) brain wants to categorize as follows

true solid state.. analog solid state amplification such as the old 60s/70s Kustoms... Randalls, Roland JC's...

true tube amps... well we all know what those are...

hybrid amps..valvestate type things.. solid state but with a tube pre-amp or some such...


then modeling amps...which technically, could be any of the above.... no reason you couldn't have a modeling tube amp.. i believe there are a few on the market...

so modeling to me is another factor entirely, not reliant on a particular power section architecture.....

popthree
January 17th, 2012, 01:28 PM
to answer the OP.. what would 'i' require in a solid state amp..

at least 50 watts.. the more the merrier
A sparkling clean channel.. can be a single channel... no overdrive channel required for me
12" speaker minimum
real reverb
reasonable portability... dolly or casters optional

no modeling

TG
January 17th, 2012, 01:51 PM
I have 3 amps right now.

A Fender '57 Deluxe Tweed combo.

A ZT Lunchbox and cab.

A Roland Cube60.

I'm OK gigging any one of them. I can get a sound from both of those SS amps that works, for me, as well as the 5E3 amp.



Incidentally, at different times I've owned a Tech21 Trademark10, a Roland Cube80x and a Fender Mustang3.

Loathed them.

To each his own, or whatever....

Stewart Ward
January 17th, 2012, 02:06 PM
big difference, IMO, between solid state & modeling

to me 'going solid state' means analog solid state... digital modeling is another matter entirely.

Modelling amps are computers. They convert analogue signals into digital code and manipulate them in the digital domain. It is then converted back to analogue and amplified through a solid state (or valve - Line6) power amp. The SS power amp almost always has current feedback to emulate the unique relationship that a speaker has with an output transformer - which creates further flattering harmonics in the sound that CANNOT be created by the amplifier electronics. The latter has to be analogue because it varies with speaker type and the frequency being amplified, so it's impossible for a computer to emulate this in sofware.

Solid State amps are generally thought of as purely analogue devices, like a valve amp is.

Greg.Coal
January 17th, 2012, 09:14 PM
I think amps and tone are really subjective , it all depends on what sound you are trying to get.. I have now found my sound! . .
As others have said, "Congratulations!"

And, it is true: find "the sound" you like and spend more time playing and growing musically and developing more of who you are as a player!

Greg

headache31
January 17th, 2012, 09:40 PM
I have a Behringer V-Tone 110 that a friend gigged with one night and he asked if it was a tube amp! This guy is not a rookie either.

Flaneur
January 17th, 2012, 10:27 PM
I'd want something small, tough, reliable and disposably cheap- say, for 20.

A headphone jack, a speaker out, a couple of channels- and enough watts to fill a small pub, would be handy.

A bunch of distortion settings might be fun.

My Roland Cube 15 does all this. Love the thing. Use it for quiet practice at home and gig it regularly- while my 'good' amps are gathering dust.

TimW
January 17th, 2012, 10:28 PM
As others have said, "Congratulations!"

And, it is true: find "the sound" you like and spend more time playing and growing musically and developing more of who you are as a player!

Greg

Exactly!!

Cheers,
Tim

soulman969
January 17th, 2012, 10:53 PM
I think a Roland JC-120 is the best overall SS made. The clean sound of that amp is just incredible. The chorus and tremolo effects are outstanding. Their worst feature is weight.

I can get around that and get a great JC-120 sound out of a Roland Cube. The amp models are a nice feature as are the effects although the only ones I use are reverb and tremolo. They have an amazingly full sound for such small amps. Mine is only 40w but it can hold it's own in any small club types situation by itself. They are great sounding inexpensive amps.

daveandshelle
January 18th, 2012, 02:51 PM
Peavey

63dot
January 20th, 2012, 02:09 AM
Even though I generally like tube amps and hybrid amps better than solid state amps (for rock music), the Tech 21 solid state amp sounds better than 90% percent of tube amps under 50 watts. It is so clear and yet so warm.

For a larger solid state amp, it's really hard to beat the Roland Jazz Chorus 120. It sounds very glassy and great with single coil pickups without sounding sterile like some solid state amps could get. I am not too fond of rock and roll/hard rock with high output humbuckers and that particular amp though.

If you want that Marshall distorted sound, their tube and transistor amps are fairly similar unlike a Crate amp where their tube and transistor amps could be quite different. My practice amp is a small Crate transistor amp and it's pretty sterile and only has warmth with some distortion. It's clean tone is just a little too clean for my taste. If I wished to have a small transistor amp to replace it, hands down it would be the great Tech 21.

For jazz and clean tones most associated with mellower neck pup, a transistor amp is where it is at and probably the amp that set the tone for electric jazz was the solid state Polytone amp as used by Joe Pass and many others.

chrom-freak
January 20th, 2012, 03:23 AM
Even though I generally like tube amps and hybrid amps better than solid state amps (for rock music), the Tech 21 solid state amp sounds better than 90% percent of tube amps under 50 watts. It is so clear and yet so warm.

For a larger solid state amp, it's really hard to beat the Roland Jazz Chorus 120. It sounds very glassy and great with single coil pickups without sounding sterile like some solid state amps could get. I am not too fond of rock and roll/hard rock with high output humbuckers and that particular amp though.

If you want that Marshall distorted sound, their tube and transistor amps are fairly similar unlike a Crate amp where their tube and transistor amps could be quite different. My practice amp is a small Crate transistor amp and it's pretty sterile and only has warmth with some distortion. It's clean tone is just a little too clean for my taste. If I wished to have a small transistor amp to replace it, hands down it would be the great Tech 21.

For jazz and clean tones most associated with mellower neck pup, a transistor amp is where it is at and probably the amp that set the tone for electric jazz was the solid state Polytone amp as used by Joe Pass and many others.

good point. my first amp was a amp out of a 90€ guitar/amp set and i always thought it was awful. sometime ago i dug it out of my closet and fired it up and plugged in the cheapo guitar that came with it and noticed that it sounds very alive and also has a quite nice breakup when the clean channel is cranked. the dist channel just sounds sharp and flat but that is to expect with a cheapo solid state amp. again it shows that tone is in the fingers of the player.

tele salivas
January 20th, 2012, 06:14 AM
A lack of color and warmth are the usual complaints. I have used old Kustom and Laney amps which have had character and depth. THere is good stuff out there, but the gain characteristics of a decent tube amp are hard to match.

Telecastoff1
January 22nd, 2012, 10:38 AM
I just bought an old Yamaha G100-212 Series II amp yesterday on CraigsList. The amp is totally stock and in near perfect condition. No rips or tears anywhere, and it really does sound just like my old Twin. I never thought I could say that about any SS Amp. Plugged straight into this amp, my Tele does its twangy, chickin pickin stuff beautifully. This is a really nice, well taken care for amp. Definitely a keeper, and to think I only paid $80.00 for it! It sits proudly in my herd of Fenders and Peaveys.

Ben Furman
January 22nd, 2012, 04:53 PM
There is only one. Spend the money and be done.

I completely agree with the sentiment but have come to a different conclusion: the Pritchard Gold Estoc.

Remember Pearce amps? They were pretty decent, really.

These have a very loyal following and are moderately hard to find.

The SS power amp almost always has current feedback to emulate the unique relationship that a speaker has with an output transformer - which creates further flattering harmonics in the sound that CANNOT be created by the amplifier electronics. The latter has to be analogue because it varies with speaker type and the frequency being amplified, so it's impossible for a computer to emulate this in sofware.

Why do you say this response can be emulated in hardware but not modeled in software? Software can reproduce any transfer function you could care to imagine. Besides that, there is always an analog interface with the speakers.

hiero
January 27th, 2012, 04:24 PM
Tech 21, JC120, Polytone or an old Session... that is the clutch to home in on...

dada
January 27th, 2012, 04:35 PM
Almost anything Peavey or a Yamaha G100 II. Great cleans, just a bit more sterile than tube.

Had a Yamaha G100 115. Loved the amp, but I couldn't move it anymore. Heavier than a Twin.

Drunkinminer
January 27th, 2012, 06:39 PM
I'm really digging my GDEC jr Carbon. It's my second jr. First one died and Fender replaced it. In fact I think the Carbon is better then the original I had.

beexter
January 27th, 2012, 07:07 PM
Proud owner of Tech 21 TM60, Roland Cube 60 (the digital one) and a Sessionette 75. All great and have never let me down or cost me a penny more than I paid for them. All bought used and collectively they've cost me less than 350.
Set them all up for clean tones and use pedals for dirt. All of them sound great, are loud enough to gig with un-miced and easily portable.

classicplayer
February 1st, 2012, 06:21 PM
I have been using two modeling amps. The Roland Micro Cube and the Cube 20X. I know......digital; not strictly SS, but witness this following performance using a Cube 20X:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T2BMLWR27OE&list=UUMEaKRafZHSBl6dYylblWRQ&index=9&feature=plcp

I was wondering if I'd bought the wrong amp, until I heard the above. It turns out he uses it live through two powered speakers and is quite pleased with the results for both live and recorded work. So, I'm keeping mine and yes, I have found some great tones with it. As stated in a previous post, you just have to spend plenty of time tweaking and listening. The only drawback with these Cubes, and it's a minor one, is that just minor adjustments in the gain, volume and E.Q section completely changes your tone. Once I got around that issue, I started to really appreciate this new "age" of modeling amps. They should only get better in future models.

Classicplayer

FenderGuy53
February 22nd, 2012, 09:48 AM
Well I - like others here, are really happy with my Peavey Bandit (new model) and my Cube 40XL. These two SS amps cover the clean to warm sounds that I like. I think they are both really great amps. Both keepers.

How would you compare the two?

I'm looking for a smallish s/s amp, w/ built-in effects, that's capable of handling band rehearsals and small gigs, unmic'ed.

Thanks.

Jagg76
February 22nd, 2012, 10:12 AM
My Fender M-80 Stereo Chorus has amazing cleans.

- Jagg

nicer
February 22nd, 2012, 10:49 AM
[QUOTE=Timbertea;3823472]In terms of live performance I was always happiest with the Roland JC-120, JC-77, and JC-50 when I had that. Except for the time I had to go down the stairs in the ice carrying the JC-120 ... Casters don't help with stairs. The Roland Cube series has a couple good amps in it, and those wont endanger you as much in the above scenario.
QUOTE]

Nice to see someone stand up for the JC-77. In many ways a cheaper, lighter JC-120. So clean you won't miss the effects loop. Totally worthless 'distortion' knob, and totally massive aluminum dust caps on the original Japanese speakers. Seek one out.

Marky D.
February 22nd, 2012, 05:43 PM
I think a Roland JC-120 is the best overall SS made.

I saw Lonnie Mack once in Mpls playing his flying V through a JC-120... it sounded fantastic!

Also, in my earlier post about the Special 130:
I didn't care for the Batman logo on this era of Peavey but I'm learning to like it because the amp sounds so good.

The Special 130 didn't have the Batman logo - just the regular old 70s Peavey logo - my goof!

GrantR
February 23rd, 2012, 12:47 AM
How would you compare the two?

I'm looking for a smallish s/s amp, w/ built-in effects, that's capable of handling band rehearsals and small gigs, unmic'ed.

Thanks.

The Cube 40XL is a really great little amp. It is versatile, and sounds great. I would have a Cube over pretty much any other small SS amp. However, in saying that, I haven't tried some of the other popular small amps around, and there will be guys/girls here that champion other brands.
The Mustang II is a great sounding amp too, IMHO - if you want portability, good sound, and versatility. I'm not sure it would handle a small gig without being mic'ed? You can bet someone here is probably doing just that, though.

We know that the Cube 40 (and a Cube 20 ?) is regularly used for small gigs by a certain Englishman on this site, and I know he is very pleased with the capabilities for gigging, of small Cube amps . . . :grin:

Wyzsard
February 23rd, 2012, 03:50 AM
The Bandit has my attention recently.

yf711n04wqg&feature=related

ac15
February 23rd, 2012, 03:55 AM
The Bandit has my attention recently.

yf711n04wqg&feature=related

The Bandit sounds better than the Vox in that clip.

Tony474
February 23rd, 2012, 06:05 AM
We know that the Cube 40 (and a Cube 20 ?) is regularly used for small gigs by a certain Englishman on this site, and I know he is very pleased with the capabilities for gigging, of small Cube amps . . . :grin:

Perhaps it's me you're referring to, Grant. Sure enough, I do occasionally use my Cube 20X for restricted-volume gigs, but my bigger Cube is a 60 - which is up for just about any gig you can throw at it. I own loads of amps but if need be I could happily get by with just the Cubes.

Oh, and just by the bye, for bass use the now-superseded Bass Cube 100 is unbelievably capable for such a compact, portable unit.

Stewart Ward
February 23rd, 2012, 09:39 AM
The Bandit sounds better than the Vox in that clip.

+1 Sounds like it's got P10Rs loaded!

But... recorded sound is influenced by the mic. Mics always add a small amout of sparkle to guitar sounds. This would not be heard live!

All mics alter the sound, they are just speakers in reverse, with a cone (diaphram) which adds mechanically generated harmonics NOT in the original sound. This is why recording engineers have so many mics in their arsenal. As creative tools!

GrantR
February 23rd, 2012, 11:12 AM
Perhaps it's me you're referring to, Grant. Sure enough, I do occasionally use my Cube 20X for restricted-volume gigs, but my bigger Cube is a 60 - which is up for just about any gig you can throw at it. I own loads of amps but if need be I could happily get by with just the Cubes.

Oh, and just by the bye, for bass use the now-superseded Bass Cube 100 is unbelievably capable for such a compact, portable unit.

Sorry Tony, I forgot you use a 60 watt Cube, not a 40. But none the less, Cubes of reasonably modest outputs, are quite capable of handling gigs, unmic'ed. What is amazing is the sound level they can produce, from a small box, and with excellent tone. To look at one, without hearing it, you could be forgiven for considering them to be 'toys'.
I really enjoy my 40XL, and putting a G3 in front of it, gives it even more scope.

schenkadere
February 23rd, 2012, 11:21 AM
I think the Tech 21 TM60 is the best SS I've heard. The modern Roland Cubes are nice, of course...and the old Roland Blues Cubes(BC-30/60)are quite nice too...not much mention of these here.

Tony474
February 23rd, 2012, 11:29 AM
I really enjoy my 40XL, and putting a G3 in front of it, gives it even more scope.

Yup, I use a G3 as well when I'm not using my pedalboard. Nice bit of kit.

I think the Tech 21 TM60 is the best SS I've heard. The modern Roland Cubes are nice, of course...and the old Roland Blues Cubes(BC-30/60)are quite nice too...not much mention of these here.

Call me greedy, but I too use a TM60 - possibly my favourite as well - in addition to my COSM Cubes and my BC-60 Blues Cube. All great amps and each has its own particular area of excellence.

jjh37854
February 23rd, 2012, 11:32 AM
nashville 212

Carvalho Diablo
February 23rd, 2012, 02:48 PM
Practiced with the band last night, just me and our other guitarist and our bass player working out a couple of new songs and arrangements.

I took my Logan tele and my Retro Channel head which I played through the rehearsal facility's Marshall 1960A 4x12; our other guitarist took a Vox Tonelab to drive the house little Laney combo with an 8 inch speaker...and it sounded great. I mean really great.

I have been playing valve amps for the last 10 years, and my day to day amp is still an all valve Rat modded Blackheart Little Giant, but those solid state tones last night were killer.

After practice, I slung my guitar on my back and carried my amp (which weighs little more than a couple of bags of sugar) one handed round to the pub.

Try doing that with an all valve beast !

slystatus
May 15th, 2012, 01:16 PM
If I could only use SS, it would need to be an amp with huge clean headroom, and a fairly warm tone. Something like a Roland JC120 (or even better.... a Roland JC200 head, paired with two 212 cabinets in stereo), or a Acoustic 270 head w/the matching cab..... then use pedals for effects/gain etc.


As an Acoustic 270 owner I can amen this! Haven't played or heard the aforementioned Roland. Suffice to say I love my baby so far. I was using her mostly as a bass head but am playing more guitar and am currently building a 2x12 cab for that purpose.
Anyone happen to know of any threads on here with more Acoustic info? I've been searching for days now with only small results.

schenkadere
May 15th, 2012, 02:13 PM
My first choice would be the Tech 21 Trademark 60, but I'm very happy with my red stripe USA Peavey Transtube.

I really dig SS amps...I actually prefer them.

jtees4
May 15th, 2012, 03:01 PM
SS must have minimum 60 watts for me, usually prefer 100+.
Old early to mid '80's Peaveys were solid as a rock, bulletproof and heavy as hell. Great clean channels with great reverb....just add a pedal or two and be done with it. Solo series comes to mind, many models ranging from 120-160 watts....all dirt cheap used these days. As far as modern, I'd get a Cube80xl if I was buying now, might also consider a Mustang.

banjohabit
May 15th, 2012, 03:49 PM
As an Acoustic 270 owner I can amen this! Haven't played or heard the aforementioned Roland. Suffice to say I love my baby so far. I was using her mostly as a bass head but am playing more guitar and am currently building a 2x12 cab for that purpose.
Anyone happen to know of any threads on here with more Acoustic info? I've been searching for days now with only small results.

i fairly recently purchased an Acoustic fg 35r, 12 in.,35 watt amp. it pretty much does what the old Acoustics did well, squeaky clean, consistent tone from very quiet to loud. mine takes pedals extremely well, very much a "blank canvas" to tone-paint with your effects board. exactly what i wanted.

all that said, a lot about this amp left me unenthusiastic, particularly the overall quality (or lack thereof) of the cabinet, speaker, and (not surprised) on-board effects. however, i must say (my impressions aside) this amp now lives in a trailer (in it's shipping box) and is definitely not pampered by those (i am just one) who handle it. so far, the cab seems sturdy as can be.

the speaker was changed for an eminence swamp thang and that has made all the difference. as the new speaker breaks in i am finally getting the sound i've been spending money for nearly two yrs. to get.

so, though all the controls on this amp feel and function most excellently, it is NOT a purchase-and-plug-in amp. i did the perhaps the easiest mod you can do for a combo amp, and was rewarded with a keeper.

of course, i already have a keeper: vox pathfinder 15R. love it ! i only got the Acoustic to up the ante volume-wise, which it did, but only after i installed the swamp thang: the vox could nearly hang with it with the stock 12'' speaker !

Stratburst
May 15th, 2012, 05:08 PM
I'm different from most posters here in that I prefer solid state for practicing, small gigs and house jams, and I'll use tubes for full-band rehearsal and bigger gigs. So my priorities are great tone and a headphone out jack; I could care less about built-in FX.

That said, my two favourites are the Tech 21 Trademark 30 and the Roland Microcube. The Tech 21 has great sounds if you know how to dial it in, an effects loop, a headphone out and an XLR out for recording at home (very handy). I also prefer its tone to the Microcube, which sounds too plastic-y for my ears. If I didn't already have a couple of great tube amps, I'd likely buy the Trademark 60 for gigging.

Neither one holds a candle to my Mesa-Boogie TA-30 or Winfield Cyclone, though. :cool:

Wyzsard
May 15th, 2012, 08:16 PM
I'm different from most posters here in that I prefer solid state for practicing, small gigs and house jams, and I'll use tubes for full-band rehearsal and bigger gigs. So my priorities are great tone and a headphone out jack; I could care less about built-in FX.

That said, my two favourites are the Tech 21 Trademark 30 and the Roland Microcube. The Tech 21 has great sounds if you know how to dial it in, an effects loop, a headphone out and an XLR out for recording at home (very handy). I also prefer its tone to the Microcube, which sounds too plastic-y for my ears. If I didn't already have a couple of great tube amps, I'd likely buy the Trademark 60 for gigging.

Neither one holds a candle to my Mesa-Boogie TA-30 or Winfield Cyclone, though. :cool:

Old thread of mine that has been resurrected today. That said, I'd like to thank everyone who replied and offered thoughts on various models. Good stuff. :cool:

Jagg76
May 17th, 2012, 03:40 PM
I miss my old Fender M80 Stereo Chorus - (R.I.P 1995-2012)

-Jagg

Chautauqua
May 17th, 2012, 08:35 PM
Find an old Heath Kit T16... I used one for quite awhile and it was an AMAZING SS amp... I still have an older Fender Frontman 212 and despite what you may read on the internet, its clean tone is REALLY good. If you're looking for the "high-gain" thing it'll do that too. Would I trade my C50-212 for either one... no, but I got GREAT tone out of both of those amps and with Fenders looking like they do, I fooled quite a few people into thinking it was a "nice tube amp" on several occasions.

Dave_O
May 18th, 2012, 12:06 AM
Not averse to a good SS amp. All I require is a good sound, with light weight as a bonus.

I got a couple of Peavey Rage amps (15watts) that are great-sounding little amps. Especially the one with the 10" Fender OEM speaker I got shoehorned into the baffle. Super-lightweight and cost peanuts, so I'll happily stick my Cort Strat copy and lead in a gigbag on my back, strap the Rage to the luggage rack on my Honda Shadow and ride off to a jam or rehearsal somewhere.

I've also got a EH 44 Magnum backup amp (http://www.tdpri.com/forum/amp-central-station/317655-impromptu-gig-review-ehs-magnum-44-a.html) that fits in my lead bag. Did a whole gig with it a few months back when I had a dicky valve socket in my AC30.

63dot
May 18th, 2012, 12:17 AM
Tech 21 is great but pricey for a small SS amp.

Roland Cube series is a trusted entity and almost legendary like previous Roland Jazz Chorus 120.

looney77
May 18th, 2012, 12:58 AM
63dot, is that Pepper Keenan in your avatar?

HOBBSTER01
May 18th, 2012, 01:01 AM
Peavey Bandit you just cannot go wrong with one.
+1

soulman969
May 18th, 2012, 02:22 AM
The Roland Cubes have what I'm looking from. Very light, well built, good effects and the amp models provide reasonably good useable facsimile's of the classic amp tones.

63dot
May 18th, 2012, 05:49 AM
63dot, is that Pepper Keenan in your avatar?

Yeah, mostly though because it's the same guitar as mine. I have heard some of his stuff and similar but my tastes are more old school punk and hard rock.

AndrewG
May 18th, 2012, 07:39 AM
Well . . . I succumbed to temptation and bought a Mustang IV. I "borrowed" the amp for a few days first - on trial from my local store.
I found quite a lot of the presets are totally useless to me (as is often the case with manufacturer presets IME), but if you spend some time 'building' an amp tone from scratch, there certainly are some very nice sounds to be had.
For me - so far, I am enjoying the sounds from the Fender twin reverb 65, and a Bassman. I'm sure I will find more sounds I like. With those two amps, setting them up from the start, - they sound exactly like the real amps - to my ears. I think that's pretty good. Lots of bells and whistles available, and a lot more to tweak via computer, to really get into an amp or an effect, and fine tune it to the nth degree.
The two 12" speakers sound pretty good. I'm sure there will be people that will replace them to get even better sounds.
But after trying one previously, and just simply going off the presets, I was not that impressed. I think with any of these types of amps, you have to be able to take the time to experiment, to find the sounds you enjoy.
So far . . . so good !! :-)

Yes, many of the presets on my Mustang III have been tailored to the tastes of the hard rock chaps, also I found a lot of the cleaner presets had too much treble programmed in. A couple of minutes pushing buttons and tweaking sag and bias settings (clever these Fender chaps!), and I got some very satisfying tones. I'd still love either a proper DRRI or Supersonic though. Sigh...

WireLine
May 18th, 2012, 07:46 AM
As shown time and time again, solid state can be done - right. The thing about the current state of it though, seems the insistence of manufacturers to make SS amps a lower cost 'all in one' product, a practice I wish they would not do for the simple reason of repair ability. If one element goes down (more and more likely with the cost cutting methods in manufacturing, RoHS, and such), then the entire amp is rendered worthless, and it seems more times than not cheaper to throw it away and buy a new one than to fix the old one.

Maybe its too old school, but when looking for any amp, I would rather have great sound and not have to pay for a lot of things I don't use - let me pick my own effects, thank you. Spend the manufacturing money in building reliable products, not flimsy ones that are computer based things with a speaker attached.

Some of the very best (and most expensive) high end recording equipment is solid state - Neve, API, etc...so the technology to reproduce exquisite sound is there - putting all the superfluous stuff at a price point is where it all starts to go downhill.

Just a pre-coffee ramble.

jefrs
May 18th, 2012, 08:02 AM
What am I looking for? - clean, gain, more gain and too much gain. Plus a full set of good tone controls.

What have I got/had?
Peavey Transtube Express-112 (80W Bandit) - gone, I miss it but it did not do quiet.
Peavey MicroBass - 20W bass practice amp, completely bullet proof, gets used as a headphone and workshop amp.
Roland Cube20X - cute little modelling amp
Vox AD30VT - giggable modelling amp, a step up from the Pathfinder 15r but too many controls, practically useless combined low-level headphone/line-out socket.

The modelling amps do add more versatility but for some reason I still prefer discrete components, transistors rather than integrated circuits, old school solid-state. Somewhere I have a 2N3055/2N2955 (up to 300W) discrete amp in bits that I intend to resurrect as a bass amp if and when I get a tuit. I doubt I shall configure it at maximum power (more like 100W p-p) but do expect to get a lot more real watts out of it than a typical Class D (bs watts) rated at three times its power.

Tony Ferrari
May 18th, 2012, 09:02 AM
I'm currently playing an un-modded Vox Pathfinder 15R in both of my bands at practice and it sounds great.
However, I am currently obsessed with getting a MicroPro 200 (http://www.quilterlabs.com/products/micropro-200.htm?gclid=CJa11ZmNg7ACFYuc7Qod_04Xjw) from Quilter

jefrs
May 20th, 2012, 06:57 PM
As shown time and time again, solid state can be done - right. The thing about the current state of it though, seems the insistence of manufacturers to make SS amps a lower cost 'all in one' product, a practice I wish they would not do for the simple reason of repair ability. If one element goes down (more and more likely with the cost cutting methods in manufacturing, RoHS, and such), then the entire amp is rendered worthless, and it seems more times than not cheaper to throw it away and buy a new one than to fix the old one.

Maybe its too old school, but when looking for any amp, I would rather have great sound and not have to pay for a lot of things I don't use - let me pick my own effects, thank you. Spend the manufacturing money in building reliable products, not flimsy ones that are computer based things with a speaker attached.

Some of the very best (and most expensive) high end recording equipment is solid state - Neve, API, etc...so the technology to reproduce exquisite sound is there - putting all the superfluous stuff at a price point is where it all starts to go downhill.

Just a pre-coffee ramble.

It is true that most of the little solid state amps are cheap and cheerful practice amps with too-small cost-saving low-quality speakers.

But it is not true that they cannot be repaired. What you do need to do is find an electronics engineer willing to do the job. Normally simple enough job to do, the components are cheap too. But most EEs are busy holding down well paid professional jobs in IT and the like. But these guys ain't cheap even if they are hobby repairists - and then the amp is BER (Beyond Economic Repair).

Oakville Dave
May 20th, 2012, 07:19 PM
I've been SS for years -they cut through the mix of a nine piece band much better than tube amps for some reason - and bought 2 Mustang IIIs last year. They do everything you could possibly want, including a great 12 string simulator! The III is the perfect combination of versatility, tone, output, and portability for only $300!!!

Jump on one before the price increases!

GrantR
May 20th, 2012, 08:51 PM
I've been SS for years -they cut through the mix of a nine piece band much better than tube amps for some reason - and bought 2 Mustang IIIs last year. They do everything you could possibly want, including a great 12 string simulator! The III is the perfect combination of versatility, tone, output, and portability for only $300!!!

Jump on one before the price increases!

+ 1

Love my Mustang IV (and my Vox VT120+, and Cube 40XL)

SS amps are really great. I have no tube amps anymore, and no regrets. :grin:

JohnSS
May 20th, 2012, 10:38 PM
What am I looking for? - clean, gain, more gain and too much gain. Plus a full set of good tone controls.

What have I got/had?
Peavey Transtube Express-112 (80W Bandit) - gone, I miss it but it did not do quiet.
Peavey MicroBass - 20W bass practice amp, completely bullet proof, gets used as a headphone and workshop amp.
Roland Cube20X - cute little modelling amp
Vox AD30VT - giggable modelling amp, a step up from the Pathfinder 15r but too many controls, practically useless combined low-level headphone/line-out socket.

The modelling amps do add more versatility but for some reason I still prefer discrete components, transistors rather than integrated circuits, old school solid-state. Somewhere I have a 2N3055/2N2955 (up to 300W) discrete amp in bits that I intend to resurrect as a bass amp if and when I get a tuit. I doubt I shall configure it at maximum power (more like 100W p-p) but do expect to get a lot more real watts out of it than a typical Class D (bs watts) rated at three times its power.


If you are looking for a SS amp with super clean but loud capacity with plenty of headroom but with tons of gain on tap if needed, I would advise checking out a Hughes and Kettner Warp 7. They still crop up used and there is also a combo version.

GrantR
May 21st, 2012, 01:35 AM
Another good, simple, SS amp that springs to mind for excellent cleans, and a lot of headroom, is the good old Fender Frontman 212. Cheap and reliable, and with a really nice clean sound, IMHO. Put a pedal(s) in front, and it sorts out the crunch / distortion side of things, better than the Drive channel does . . .
Some people change the speakers out, and further improve the sound . . .

Good luck with your choice. :grin:

lareplus
May 21st, 2012, 04:30 AM
vox pathfinder 15r. . .compact and light weight, great sound. . .eternal speaker out, line out and headphone capable. looks real good and very low cost. you can't beat that for a a home practice amp and you can also plug into a 4x12 etc and play with the band.

Tony474
May 21st, 2012, 06:35 AM
vox pathfinder 15r . . . eternal speaker out . . .

Does this mean it sustains for ever? (I see what you did there... :wink: :grin:)

Inuitdream
May 21st, 2012, 07:02 AM
I used to have this really great sounding solid state amp by Acoustic. It was a combo with a brown tolex 1x12.

Awesome sounding grit and od. Cleans were blah. But the OD channel was great!

howlin
May 21st, 2012, 07:05 AM
There are some good players that have gotten good tone from solid state. I think Ray Flacke used solid state Lab Series if I'm not mistaken.

BB King used a Lab Series (http://www.uberproaudio.com/who-plays-what/232-bb-kings-guitar-gear-rig-and-equipment) amp at one time.

Albert King used an Acoustic (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acoustic_Control_Corporation) amp as well as many others.

metulmykul
May 21st, 2012, 05:29 PM
I swear by solid state, old analogue stuff. Anything from the late 70s - early 80s, before they got digital.

I had a Lab Series L5 but could not gel with it. I think speaker matching is essential with these amps. Mine had a couple of big Eminence in it and it just wasn't right, way too dark.

I've used SS Yamahas for a few years now. My G100 2x12 is a keeper as are the couple of G100 heads that i have. I also use a Roland Studio Bass 100 (i run into 2 amps) This thing is the bomb, way better than my Yamaha B115.

I've just picked up a Randall RG 90 4x10 which is pretty sweet but not quite loud enough. I'm thinking it 45w a side, buy they look bloody good.

Bottom line for me is the Yamahas and Rolands are loud as you need, have acres of clean headroom and will take pedals all day. That's all i need in an amp.

GrantR
May 21st, 2012, 09:07 PM
Does this mean it sustains for ever? (I see what you did there... :wink: :grin:)

Yeah, I was wondering about that . . . ?, and if it is eternal, . . . what happens to the infernal speaker . . . ? does it just burn out after a particularly heavy solo . . .
I guess these are just questions, that can't really be answered . . . :twisted::lol:

As you were . . .

Coffeemutt
May 21st, 2012, 10:00 PM
I had a SS red-knob Fender JAM 25w back around 1989. Great cleans and had a spring reverb :smile:

I quit playing for a few years and got back into it with a MIM Tele my wife bought me. I borrowed my brother-in-law's solid-state Yorkville 50w bass combo, and it sounded awesome with a Danelectro OD in front of it. Should've bought that amp from him...

Lostinthe50s
May 21st, 2012, 11:13 PM
But it is not true that they cannot be repaired. What you do need to do is find an electronics engineer willing to do the job. Normally simple enough job to do, the components are cheap too. (Beyond Economic Repair).

Or a really good Technologist! I've made a fair chunk buying dead Vox modellers (VT etc.) for $20-$50 and fixing them. The surface mount stuff is nothing for someone who has the skills. And they almost always blow the input op-amps, unless it's something on the analog board - and that's dead simple.

I'm constantly amazed at all the service people who spit out "uneconomical to repair" when the reality is that they just haven't invested the time to keep up with the technology. Learning surface mount skills is not a far reach for someone with decent soldering skills.

My average parts cost is under $1 and my time (now that I've invested some time) is under a half hour. Troubleshooting is simply plug in headphone. If there's sound the problem is on the analog board. No sound, just swap the op-amps.

WireLine
May 21st, 2012, 11:35 PM
That's good stuff, if that's where you want to invest time. I'm not a technologist, though. I'm a musician, producer, and recording engineer, therefore rely on folks like you who DO invest the time and effort (and pay for it accordingly) to keep up with such things.

I never knew of, nor had any techs I use (all tube heads or pure digital guys) of the simple methods you described! Sounds pretty simple (and prosperous) when you put it that way. Gotta admit, most of us would probably be sunk without folks who keep up with such things!

Jeff_K
May 21st, 2012, 11:53 PM
+1

I just scored a red stripe Bandit 112 of CL for $100. The thing is amazing. Unbelievably loud and great tone. Solid as a rock and the clean channel takes pedals really well. Can't play above 1 (ONE!) in the house. My only regret is that I waited so long to get one. Getting rid of everything else.

Chautauqua
May 22nd, 2012, 02:05 AM
As shown time and time again, solid state can be done - right. The thing about the current state of it though, seems the insistence of manufacturers to make SS amps a lower cost 'all in one' product, a practice I wish they would not do for the simple reason of repair ability. If one element goes down (more and more likely with the cost cutting methods in manufacturing, RoHS, and such), then the entire amp is rendered worthless, and it seems more times than not cheaper to throw it away and buy a new one than to fix the old one.

Maybe its too old school, but when looking for any amp, I would rather have great sound and not have to pay for a lot of things I don't use - let me pick my own effects, thank you. Spend the manufacturing money in building reliable products, not flimsy ones that are computer based things with a speaker attached.

Some of the very best (and most expensive) high end recording equipment is solid state - Neve, API, etc...so the technology to reproduce exquisite sound is there - putting all the superfluous stuff at a price point is where it all starts to go downhill.

Just a pre-coffee ramble. good quality "ramble" mate... some really good, seldom touched on, points aye. I'd also add that, to me, MODERN SS amps are also so EFFECT HEAVY that its hard to find a GOOD BASIC SS amp... part of the reason I LOVED that Heath Kit T16 was it was real basic and actually was very VERY similar sounding to a good basic tube amp. I still miss how little it weighed and how great it sounded. Yes ... SOLID STATE CAN SOUND MORE THEN GOOD!!! It just might be harder to find what you're looking for because of the "aim" of the amps is different from tube amps... also, with all the "SS SUCKS" sentiment being thrown around there is even less resource for folks searching for a good simple SS amp... too many people will just say "Skip it, get a tube amp..." which is NOT answering the question for those asking for a good SS amp... sorry if that was too gauge a "pre-sleep" ramble aye : )

Don't be afraid, SS CAN SOUND GREAT... (says a guy who abandoned SS earlier in his life... but I can still be honest about it...)

Cheers

Dave

sacrificetravis
May 22nd, 2012, 10:50 AM
Try to find a 70s Gibson g series... verb and trem. Mosfet preamp

banjohabit
May 22nd, 2012, 12:30 PM
As shown time and time again, solid state can be done - right. The thing about the current state of it though, seems the insistence of manufacturers to make SS amps a lower cost 'all in one' product, a practice I wish they would not do for the simple reason of repair ability. If one element goes down (more and more likely with the cost cutting methods in manufacturing, RoHS, and such), then the entire amp is rendered worthless, and it seems more times than not cheaper to throw it away and buy a new one than to fix the old one.

Maybe its too old school, but when looking for any amp, I would rather have great sound and not have to pay for a lot of things I don't use - let me pick my own effects, thank you. Spend the manufacturing money in building reliable products, not flimsy ones that are computer based things with a speaker attached.

Some of the very best (and most expensive) high end recording equipment is solid state - Neve, API, etc...so the technology to reproduce exquisite sound is there - putting all the superfluous stuff at a price point is where it all starts to go downhill.

Just a pre-coffee ramble.

+ 1 i had no solos in the set for church sunday morning so the only effect i applied to my sound was a bit of reverb. just very clean tele thru a very clean SS amp with a high-response speaker (eminence swamp thang).

i checked out the videos of the set last night and it was outstanding ! every move i made, strings plucked individually or strummed all together, each note was distinct. unfortunately, perhaps, the huge boner i made was right up front as well, but that wasn't the rig's fault.

i'm highly unlikely to change that set-up unless i play a solo, which (for me, in most cases) sound best with a bit of OD. but effects have become so prevelant in the music now that just plain clean electric guitar sound is in itself what an "effect" used to be: something unusual sounding to catch the ear of the listener.

nrand
August 22nd, 2012, 05:50 PM
Sorry for the late bump but am just getting back into gig mode and revisiting my JC120 - the second one I have owned.
Has anyone else daisychained these into a valve amp?
JC120 > LaneyVC30 212 > Twin EV12L cab

NastyMojo
August 22nd, 2012, 07:16 PM
Danelectro Dirty Thirty and Nifty Fifty is by far the closest Tube sounding SS amps I've ever played through. I'd chose it over Roland Jc120...

sacrificetravis
August 22nd, 2012, 07:28 PM
70s gibson g50, G70, G80. verb and trem very beautiful sounding amp... wish i still had my G50

MintBerryCrunch
August 22nd, 2012, 08:46 PM
I would use a Roland JC in a second.
I actually have a solid state bass amp that I used in bi-amp for a few hours and for almost everything it sounded good.... so my second choice is a Fender Bassman 100 (1x12 combo).
I had a Line 6 POD XT or something a few years back, all black floorunit that was built well and sounded good...

...but I love my tubes.

Bass amps with limiters could deal with clipping by not going nasty... so maybe a nice SS Bass Amp is the way to go.

Dave_O
August 22nd, 2012, 09:43 PM
Not averse to a good SS amp. All I require is a good sound, with light weight as a bonus.

I got a couple of Peavey Rage amps (15watts) that are great-sounding little amps. Especially the one with the 10" Fender OEM speaker I got shoehorned into the baffle. Super-lightweight and cost peanuts, so I'll happily stick my Cort Strat copy and lead in a gigbag on my back, strap the Rage to the luggage rack on my Honda Shadow and ride off to a jam or rehearsal somewhere.

I've also got a EH 44 Magnum backup amp (http://www.tdpri.com/forum/amp-central-station/317655-impromptu-gig-review-ehs-magnum-44-a.html) that fits in my lead bag. Did a whole gig with it a few months back when I had a dicky valve socket in my AC30.

I picked up a Peavey Solo Series Bandit (85watts? 1 x 12" Scorpion speaker) no-goer recently for very little $$$. Spent quite a few more $$$ getting it fixed- Voltage selector had been switched down from 250v to 220v, which may or may not have contributed to the fried output trans, and trans driver on the other side. Put it back together, and it was humming like a wasp on steroids. Pull it down again to find one of the filter caps in the output stage also had a big ding in it (previous owner had lent it to his son, who'd lent it to his mate... you know where this is going:roll:).
While it was on the bench it got a going-over, anything that had drifted too far out-of-spec was replaced, and some of the more (possibly) fragile board connections were reinforced with a little Silastic blob, like a hemorrhoid pillow:grin:
$40AUD worth of parts, 3 hours labour@$88AUD per hr... ouch.

Anyway, gigged it last Friday night. If I were to rate it on a scale from 1-10, I'd give it a 7.5. I used the f/s from my Ibanez to operate the channel switch and reverb. I really liked the reverb, and I'm not really a reverb-ey type of guy. It had good cleans (but not as sweet as the cleans from my Vox or even the Ibanez TSA15). The dirt channel on this one was OK- but not as good to my ears as the dirt channel on my little Peaveys. It may need further tweaking, as the dirt channel on the Bandit has it's own EQ. I actually only use the "PRE-POST" channel on the Rages, but with the gain right down. All in all, a pretty useful amp, but I will probably flip it for a (small) profit...

ludashoeless
August 22nd, 2012, 10:49 PM
Mustang V

bigmuff113
August 22nd, 2012, 10:54 PM
Roland Jazz Chorus and the Retro Channel stuff

Gary Mitchell
August 27th, 2012, 12:51 AM
BANDIT 65

Coop47
August 27th, 2012, 07:13 AM
Cyber-Deluxe. Gotta go all in though and invest the time to figure it out. I haven't, but every once in a which I stumble across an amazing tone in there. In the hands of someone who knows what their doing, it's a pretty great tool.

ProToneThinline
August 27th, 2012, 08:03 AM
70s gibson g50, G70, G80. verb and trem very beautiful sounding amp... wish i still had my G50

The "G" series were/are seriously good sounding amps. I used to have a G20 that was my Deluxe Reverb killer. Wish I still had it.

Everybody raves about the Lab Series amps. The "G" series used the same design, minus a few features like the compressor and sweepable mid. Other than that, they are basically the same. You can find them on the used market at bargain prices. One day I will own either another G20 or a G50.

As far a new SS amps, I really like my Roland Cube 80XL. Not tons of tones, but what's there is really, really good. I'd rather have 10 good tones instead of 400 bad tones.....

naveed211
August 27th, 2012, 08:57 PM
I'd buy another Fender Stage 100. Very nice clean, takes pedals well, and it's loud enough for any gigging situation.