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How much does string gauge matter?

Leep Dog
August 8th, 2011, 01:23 PM
So I got my CV 50's Tele back from the shop after a set-up. I had been playing 9's but I had him put on some 10's. As I was playing this weekend, my tones sounded better than they did before. I can't tell if my ears are playing tricks on me or what, but I really liked what I heard. I started thinking can going from 9's to 10's really make that much different in tone?

TaylorPlayer
August 8th, 2011, 01:26 PM
Everyone is different on this topic but I have found my personal preference on my Tele and Sheraton II is 12's with a wound G. Intonation seems very easy to accomplish and the tone just seems fatter than when I have tried anything less than 12's. To me, the wound G is the most important of the strings as I have never liked the tone from an unwound G string.

tele salivas
August 8th, 2011, 02:54 PM
It makes a difference in how you play, how you pick, bend, strum, etc. The tonal difference between .8 and .13 will be significant if all other things are equal. Plus, if you use flatwounds compared to roundwounds, your going to hear some differences immediatley. Having your guitar set up proper will make the kind of significant change you are experiencing, as well.
Will anybody else notice? Not really.

Steve365
August 8th, 2011, 03:09 PM
There's been so many posts about this, there should be a separate forum just on it.

tlimbert65
August 8th, 2011, 03:10 PM
It makes a difference in how you play, how you pick, bend, strum, etc.

That's the right answer. Different string gauges make a difference in how you play, and THAT can make a difference in how you sound. I'm not saying that there aren't detectable tonal differences between lighter and heavier strings, just that it's a tiny difference that listeners aren't going to notice. The real difference comes from the impact on your bending, picking attack, etc. Buy the strings that feel best to you, and you'll sound your best.

wannapickone
August 8th, 2011, 03:21 PM
I've been using .010-.048 for a good while now and have been enjoying them. They feel "comfortable" to me as far as fretting, bending, etc. and I am getting the tone that I like also. However, I have learned about .095-.044 in the last few days and I have orderd 3 sets of them to try.........one never knows.


"KEEEEEEEEEP ON A PICKIN" WPO

Alex W
August 8th, 2011, 03:22 PM
I see it as a trade-off between ease of playing and sweetness of tone as the strings get thicker. For rhythm guitar and for playing that doesn't rely on a lot of whole-step bends, heavier strings with a wound G string are great. For lead playing, especially with lots of bends on the G and B strings, lighter gauges work best for me. I've noticed that lighter gauge strings tend to need retuning more often.

telex76
August 8th, 2011, 05:25 PM
It makes a difference in how you play, how you pick, bend, strum, etc. The tonal difference between .8 and .13 will be significant if all other things are equal. Plus, if you use flatwounds compared to roundwounds, your going to hear some differences immediatley. Having your guitar set up proper will make the kind of significant change you are experiencing, as well.
Will anybody else notice? Not really.

+1. With the right touch 8's can give a very full sound. With the wrong touch they can sound like a childs toy.

Old Cane
August 8th, 2011, 05:27 PM
It matters as much as it matters.

jefrs
August 8th, 2011, 05:51 PM
String gauge affects the sound. Properly set up you should have no problem playing 8s or 13s
Choose string gauge for the sound you want.

VintageToneGuy
August 8th, 2011, 06:01 PM
Plus, if you use flatwounds compared to roundwounds, your going to hear some differences immediatley.

What would be the noticeable tonal difference between flat and round wound strings? I've never played flat wound and am intrigued.:wink:

Colt W. Knight
August 8th, 2011, 06:02 PM
15$ experiment,

buy a set of 9s, 10s, and 11s.

Try em all out. Really takes the mystery right out of it.

Personally, I think bigger strings sound better. Notice I didn't say smaller strings sound bad.

Televised
August 8th, 2011, 06:18 PM
Increase in string size gives me slight increase in improved tone and slight decrease in playability....very subjective here...but I do notice a slight difference.
Like the nice Bright Damarrio's EXL 120, 9-42
Really like David Gilmore GHS Blue Boomer hybrids, (10,12,16-Steel - 28,38,48-Nickel)
Nice playability and tone

keeffan
August 8th, 2011, 07:27 PM
Ask Billy Gibbons.....:)

Rufus
August 8th, 2011, 10:53 PM
Ask Billy Gibbons.....:)

The point is moot...How do you know that you wouldn't like his tone better if he played 12's?

But then again, his guitar tones are so heavily processed that it probably wouldn't make a difference.

Joe-Bob
August 8th, 2011, 11:10 PM
The bigger string guage does make a diference in the sound.

Whether you like it better or not is entirely up to you.

The bigger strings also feel different -- again, it's a personal preference.

The .010 string is more than 10% bigger than the .009. This extra mass will produce a bigger reaction in the pickup's magnetic field and produce a larger output than the previous string set. Again, this may be what you like, or perhaps not.

The most important thing is how you feel about it. We play guitar with our hands, so the different feel of the new guage is very important to you...or should be. Do you like it more? Does it seem to help you play? Do you like the sound better? Are you having fun?

It's your guitar. You are the only one who has to like it. :cool:

Stdon
August 9th, 2011, 12:18 AM
For me, going from D'Addario 9's to Curt Mangon 10 standard made an appreciable positive difference. Tones are richer and cleaner, stays in tune better, bends and vibratos more precise. For me I liked the change.

nigeldaddy
August 9th, 2011, 12:46 AM
i don't claim to have "the" answer, but regarding heavy strings i think peoples' ears may be getting tricked. your ears generally perceive louder as "better" (think BBE sonic maximizer). and when you slam a chord on those big old heavy strings, they're louder. food for thought.

ITSGOTQUACK
August 9th, 2011, 02:31 AM
I have 6 different string gauges on my guitars, they all seem to sound fine to me.

TwangBilly
August 9th, 2011, 03:02 AM
It makes all the difference in the world. In your tone, your technique, everything. I can hear someone playing and usually guess about what gauge strings they're playing. Maybe only a musician would notice it from the audience, but everyone can hear your overall tone and like it or whether it blends well or not. I like my 10.5's and 11's on my Tele. You just have to find what works for you with your feel and the tone you want.

keeffan
August 9th, 2011, 06:56 AM
I still am in the camp that its in the touch. It doesnt matter if your playing an Esquire through a Valve Jr....if you are playing an electric plugged in and amplified...it's processed.
Now acoustics, whole 'nother ball of wax...

Green Lantern
August 9th, 2011, 08:27 AM
I think there is certainly a detectable tonal difference. I like the sound of 10s a lot, which just have a bigger and fuller sound to me, but I find 9s generally more comfortable and I feel it's easier for me to play blazingly fast with 9s and low action, so I have my guitars set up with 9s and 10s. The best of both worlds for me. For what it's worth, I use 10s on my Telecaster. I'm one of those types of guys who likes diversity and having varying options available to me. I could never have, like, seven Telecasters and not much of anything else, for example : p

sonny wolf
August 9th, 2011, 08:34 AM
I string all my guitars with 11 to 49 gauge...I learned how to play like that so it is very natural for me.Sometimes when I get a new guitar I'll still keep the stock strings (usually 9s or 10s)on for a few days before adjusting to the higher gauge.While I can still play with a lighter gauge,the difference is very obvious to me.It's like comparing regular coke to diet coke....regular is thick and full tasting while diet is thin and bland!!!in my Coke drinking days,I always drank Coca cola classic...nothing else would do.

christhee68
August 9th, 2011, 08:44 AM
I've just switched from Medium (13) to Lights(12) on my acoustic. It's not quite as loud as before, but it plays a lot easier.

I'm expecting my first Tele this week, and I plan on putting 11's on it. The SquireTele I had been borrowing from a friend had 10's, and I had a tendency to squeeze it out of tune.

I figure the 11s will be lighter than the acoustic but should provide a little resistance to my ham hands.

tele salivas
August 9th, 2011, 08:51 AM
What would be the noticeable tonal difference between flat and round wound strings? I've never played flat wound and am intrigued.:wink:

I use the .10 gauge D'addario Chromes(wound third). The tension and mass feel like an .11 or .12 guage roundwound. They have an almost "dead" sound, compared to the rounds. That does not mean the sound is dead, just that the excessive brright qualities you notice from a new set of roundwound strings is not present. There is more of a percussive sound and feel. When I bend low strings, more of the deep tones come through, very pleasing. Heavy rythm sounds great. In my mind, it just sounds more like an "early 50's" guitar sound, overall. Roundwounds sound more "60's". Apparantly, Luther Perkins fo Johnny Cash and The Tennessee Two fame, used flats, which I can hear in that great percussive sound. The Higher strings have a complexity that is avaialble depending on how you attack. I know a few Jazz cats around town who use Flats for their warm, rich flavor. I play honky tonk style guitar mostly, and I like how I can really dig into the highs and never get shrill. If you play with a lot of clean, or semi clean tones, you will really appreciate the difference right away.
I use a CV50's Telecaster and my chambered Les Paul set up with Flats. My other tele has .8-.38 roundwounds. :razz:

Balou
August 9th, 2011, 10:42 AM
Haven't you heard ? size doesn't matter !

flag72
August 9th, 2011, 12:38 PM
Haven't you heard ? size doesn't matter !:shock:

Telenator
August 9th, 2011, 01:05 PM
The bigger string guage does make a diference in the sound.

Whether you like it better or not is entirely up to you.

The bigger strings also feel different -- again, it's a personal preference.

The .010 string is more than 10% bigger than the .009. This extra mass will produce a bigger reaction in the pickup's magnetic field and produce a larger output than the previous string set. Again, this may be what you like, or perhaps not.

The most important thing is how you feel about it. We play guitar with our hands, so the different feel of the new guage is very important to you...or should be. Do you like it more? Does it seem to help you play? Do you like the sound better? Are you having fun?

It's your guitar. You are the only one who has to like it. :cool:

Good answer. I too feel that string gauge makes a difference in sound but I'm not sold on the idea that heavier strings sound better. The just sound different.

68thinline
August 9th, 2011, 02:24 PM
It depends on the instrument and the player. I have a tele with 9's, a tele with 10's and a strat with 11's. They all play different and it's not just the string gauge.

chabby
August 9th, 2011, 02:52 PM
it made a world of difference on my CV50.

Switvhed from 9's tp 10's and it was major difference tone-wise for the better.
Now, I used pretty much 10's standard set with a.13 high E string.
I really love the tone I get with the beefy High E on the set of 10's.
When I first did it I thought it would chew my fingers up but I haven't noticed any problem at all and I bend pretty heavily. I went and set up my guitar very well for this stringology and it really stays in tune nicely considering.

The answer is a definitive "yes" string guage matters big time. Anytime you have more metal there for the pickup to react to, there's a change in signal. That said there's also pickup height and set up issues that come into play as well, so it's a multi-faceted equation. Then there your own individual style and attack too.

I play with my fingers and no pick with a pretty heavy right hand and alot of clawing etc.
I don't even use a thumb pick, so for me the heavier guages give me more bang for the buck, more beef, more texture....just more. Then add into it the Tele is a twangy machine anyway, and it balances it better to me. I esquired my CV but use the stock Bridge pickup.

chabby
August 9th, 2011, 02:58 PM
Increase in string size gives me slight increase in improved tone and slight decrease in playability....very subjective here...but I do notice a slight difference.
Like the nice Bright Damarrio's EXL 120, 9-42
Really like David Gilmore GHS Blue Boomer hybrids, (10,12,16-Steel - 28,38,48-Nickel)
Nice playability and tone

I am currently playing the GHS Glimours set as well with the exception of the high E string and agree, it's a great set of 10's.

jefrs
August 9th, 2011, 03:26 PM
What would be the noticeable tonal difference between flat and round wound strings? I've never played flat wound and am intrigued.:wink:

Most flatwounds are like playing the mooring hawsers of a battleship, stiff, dull thud, hard work, boring..

And then there's Thomastik-Infeld Swing Jazz which are beautiful and play like one gauge lighter than they say on the packet.
If you're after a 50s sound - jazz, Rockabilly or RnR then these do it. Start with the 11s. Do note wound 3rd - will need saddle moved from round-wound.

jefrs
August 9th, 2011, 03:34 PM
A heavier string has a bigger attack, which gives the impression that it dies away quicker. Depends how you play them, if you attack hard you appear to get a short high output note, if you play softly there's no lack of sustain.

For the same reason, light string have a lighter attack, which gives them the impression that they sustain well, whereas their note does not really last as long as the heavy set, but there is less dynamic range, which is useful too. Again depends how you play them.

You choose strings for what you want them to do. It would be very boring if they all did the same thing.

Dwills94
August 9th, 2011, 03:39 PM
Tone for the most part is in the fingers but anytime you put more metal over those magnetic pickups you're going to ge more out of them IMHO. When i first started i played EB super slinky's (.09's) but a few years back i slowly switched to d'addario 10's and then on to 11's. I broke less strings (i have a very agressive pick attack which doesnt help) and expirienced greatly improved tone.

stantheman
August 9th, 2011, 04:51 PM
I cannot and will not go below 11's.
I play pickless and I take my hat off to Albert Collins, I don't know he played with Lights.
They're way outta my comfort zone as I always feel I'll get string cuts with them cheese cutters.

jefrs
August 9th, 2011, 05:29 PM
I pretty much always finger pick too, mainly 10s but also 11s and 12s and bass.

Imo if you are getting string cuts you are doing something wrong technique-wise. I'm certainly not that soft on them but I don't break strings either. 10s do sound different to 11s, so if you want the sound of Brand X 10s, that's what you use, not 11s because you're frightened of cheese wire.

rangercaster
August 9th, 2011, 05:54 PM
it's a matter of personal preference ... most of my playing time is on acoustic guitars ... so i prefer heavier strings and a higher action on my electrics ... to me, it produces better tone ... others may have different results ... that's why they sell different sizes of strings, as well as different alloys and windings ...

Scantron08
August 9th, 2011, 06:16 PM
Most flatwounds are like playing the mooring hawsers of a battleship, stiff, dull thud, hard work, boring..

And then there's Thomastik-Infeld Swing Jazz which are beautiful and play like one gauge lighter than they say on the packet.
If you're after a 50s sound - jazz, Rockabilly or RnR then these do it. Start with the 11s. Do note wound 3rd - will need saddle moved from round-wound.

Yeah, with flats, you'll need to move your saddle(s) back, that's for sure - or your entire bridge assembly, if this on a guitar that has such an option (N/A to a Tele, obviously). The flats are very smooth feeling to your fingertips, which some hate / some love, and are akin to playing gut - flatwounds on a bass for example feel like gut strings. They're supposed to be more of that true authentic 60's sound. I tried them out on my Rick 360 for a few months and liked them, but had to get used to not being able to bend the wound G up a full step. Many don't necessarily need this bend, but I was missing it for a few certain songs my band regularly does. I went back to compressed roundwounds last night on that guitar. The flats were stiffer, thicker, the rounds are more rubbery.

dsutton24
August 9th, 2011, 06:17 PM
What would be the noticeable tonal difference between flat and round wound strings?

Flat wound strings aren't as bright as round wound strings. They have more of a 'woom' sound than 'bing'.

I've got a Strat that had a tone that would make your teeth sweat. Eric Clapton would have listened to it and said, "Geeze, tone it down a bit!" It has had flat wound .011s on it for years now. It's got a sort of old bluesy sound to it; you get a lot less finger screech, and they are easier on the fingers (and fretboard). I love the sound of flat wounds, but they're not as versatile as standard round wound strings.

If you're a bass player and have never played flats, well, I promise you you're really missing something. Put flats on a J bass and you've got a first-rate funk machine.

Mark Davis
August 9th, 2011, 06:29 PM
Here is what I think.

When you strike a string it changes the magnetic field of the pickup and thats what peoduces the sounds.

You would think a heaver string might vibrate more or at least have more mass

jefrs
August 9th, 2011, 07:46 PM
Flat wound strings aren't as bright as round wound strings. They have more of a 'woom' sound than 'bing'.


That's because you're not using Thomastik Swing Jazz :mrgreen:

btw can easily bend Swing's wound 3rd up a tone.

Whether they're bright or not depends a lot on the guitar. The jazzbox w 12s is bright and the semi w 11s is "brown", but that's these guitars irrespective of the strings, you can put rounds on and they do the same.

Flats, or indeed another gauge, sometimes another maker, does change the sound but to say flats cannot be bright is wrong. I find it difficult to describe the difference, but go listen to all those bright 50s recordings made on heavy flatties, they were once the normal string set. The more flexible round wound gained popularity later, and plain 3rd sets didn't become generally available until late 60s (but you could get a 16W 3rd)

These is another type of flatwound, the tapewound, imo they are quite horrible.

jefrs
August 9th, 2011, 08:06 PM
Here is what I think.

When you strike a string it changes the magnetic field of the pickup and thats what peoduces the sounds.

You would think a heaver string might vibrate more or at least have more mass

When you pluck the string, its vertical movement interferes with the magnetic field at the pole making it weaker and stronger at the frequency of the note. So a current is then induced in the coil at this frequency, this is the signal sent to the amplifier.

A heavier string does not vibrate more, that would change the frequency of the note, but it can vibrate further for longer, greater mean string excursion. Like putting a heavy weight on a pendulum, the frequency will be the same but it will keep going for longer. Momentum is Mv. The greater the mass M, the more momentum, and v is velocity. which is proportional to a function of the frequency and excursion (and can be treated as a constant since it will be similar for any string at a given frequency). Also some strings are stiffer than others.

Strangely the mass of the string itself does not seem to induce more current, otherwise the bass E would be 20 times louder than the treble E. (relative string mass given by πr ratio)

zatoichi
August 9th, 2011, 08:09 PM
I find my guitar is vastly more *playable* w/ .12s, and I like the tone much better than w/the .010s & .009s I had on there before. The whole experience is FAR more satisfying to me.

I'm sure said playing experience would be completely different for someone else w/ my tele, but I don't care whether it's my imagination or not: I like it meaty, and I don't give a rat's breakfast for "twang". I'm happy, and that's what I'm after, ultimately.

thefees
August 10th, 2011, 09:47 PM
i don't claim to have "the" answer, but regarding heavy strings i think peoples' ears may be getting tricked. your ears generally perceive louder as "better" (think BBE sonic maximizer). and when you slam a chord on those big old heavy strings, they're louder. food for thought.

+1

thefees
August 10th, 2011, 09:52 PM
String gauge is a personal choice just like music styles, style of playing, rhythm or lead, acoustic or electric, solid or hollow, many many factors. So with all of that in mind, I play with 8's. They are the easiest to play, and not to say I'm a beginner but rather to say I can do a triple flip very accurately, and elegantly with these, and with the heavier guage strings I might stumble over a double or even a single.
As another poster mentioned it is according to your playing style too. I often take the pic and angle it slightly, using the side corner instead of the long point and it lends a whole other tone to the instrument, very deep and tubular.
This is a matter of opinion and what works best for you. I think Clapton uses 11's or 12's and Stevie Ray Vaughan is reported to have used 13's and tuned down a half a step.

boris bubbanov
August 11th, 2011, 02:36 PM
It depends on the instrument and the player. I have a tele with 9's, a tele with 10's and a strat with 11's. They all play different and it's not just the string gauge.

I like this answer, because I feel that certain guitars "crave" a setup that lends itself to one string guage, while another guitar "craves" something else.

You can try to "impose your will" on the guitar and fiddle with shims, or changing the relief, etc. but some guitars will always feel lifeless with 9s on them while others are tight and all bound up with 11s on them. The issue is mostly in the neck and you can remedy the issue in some instances by putting neck A on guitar B and vice versa. Sometimes.

I think a part of this is in the way the neck is constructed and how big a role the truss rod is playing in the necks current state. Some necks are "within specs" only while the rod is all but loose and free to rattle around in there. You want a situation where the string tension balances out the rod while the rod is actually doing work and sometimes changing string guage makes all the difference in this regard.

This is why I like a big fat maple neck with a relatively undersized truss rod. The oversized truss rods "win the cold war" over some skimpy weak necks and have little further work to do, and where there's no tension, the neck sounds like bleah.

Cymro14
August 11th, 2011, 02:47 PM
When you pluck the string, its vertical movement interferes with the magnetic field at the pole making it weaker and stronger at the frequency of the note. So a current is then induced in the coil at this frequency, this is the signal sent to the amplifier.

A heavier string does not vibrate more, that would change the frequency of the note, but it can vibrate further for longer, greater mean string excursion. Like putting a heavy weight on a pendulum, the frequency will be the same but it will keep going for longer. Momentum is Mv. The greater the mass M, the more momentum, and v is velocity. which is proportional to a function of the frequency and excursion (and can be treated as a constant since it will be similar for any string at a given frequency). Also some strings are stiffer than others.

Strangely the mass of the string itself does not seem to induce more current, otherwise the bass E would be 20 times louder than the treble E. (relative string mass given by πr ratio)

Very interesting jefrs. I have no background in science but the explanantion given here awakens some memories of o level physics!! Does this go some way as to explaining why the tone or character of heavier strings is different to lighter ones? By the way if the string is thicker wouldn't it produce less frequencies. I'm thinking of the difference in vibration/frequency between high and low E? Thanks.

morroben
August 11th, 2011, 02:55 PM
So I got my CV 50's Tele back from the shop after a set-up.

This probably has as much to do with the perceived difference as string gauge does. Gauge does matter a little, but I choose string gauge based on playability, not tone. My amp has knobs I can turn to change tone.

jefrs
August 12th, 2011, 08:15 PM
Very interesting jefrs. I have no background in science but the explanantion given here awakens some memories of o level physics!! Does this go some way as to explaining why the tone or character of heavier strings is different to lighter ones? By the way if the string is thicker wouldn't it produce less frequencies. I'm thinking of the difference in vibration/frequency between high and low E? Thanks.

Tension, what we use to tune the string. Or did you mean harmonic overtones.

A string vibrates at fundamental. 1/2, 1/3, 1/4, 1/5, etc. Some of these overtones are damped by the guitar construction but imo the string construction and alloys play a big part too. That is why I said above to choose a string set for the desired sound. Properly set up, playing any gauge should not be a problem. One should not choose a string gauge to make the guitar playable (I know, sometimes you have to). You assess what the guitar wants to sound like and then fit a string set to enhance or improve.

tele0053
August 13th, 2011, 12:13 AM
10's or 11's are IMHO are a must on teles with the single coil style pickups...
Teles with lighter strings (lighter than 10's that is) just don't cut it.
teles really need a little girth on the strings to make the tone blossum, teles are twangy as a rule but the really thin ones are just too clinky...

Yeah yeah I know James Burton plays with 8's...but then again... it's James Burton he'd make it work w/6's.
Alas... we, as mere mortals have to stay within different boundries....

Cymro14
August 13th, 2011, 08:37 AM
As a matter interest what is the lowest and highest gauge you can get ?

tele salivas
August 13th, 2011, 08:49 AM
10's or 11's are IMHO are a must on teles with the single coil style pickups...
Teles with lighter strings (lighter than 10's that is) just don't cut it.
teles really need a little girth on the strings to make the tone blossum, teles are twangy as a rule but the really thin ones are just too clinky......

Of course this is what works for you, your opinion as noted. Some people aren't going for sustain, or tone blossoms. We each have our own crieteria, and that will change as we evolve or devolve as players. We might as well be discussing why red is better than blue. The great thing is that strings are not that expensive and a pretty easy way to experiment with the guitar's feel and sound. Some guitars do like heavier or lighter gauges, but that is really due to how the thing is set up, or not. Some players simply can't play really heavy strings, and some cant playreally light strings..the 'safest' bet for the OP would be to go with .10-.46. A nice middle of the road gauge that works with every telecaster, IMO.:lol:

paulvcarter
August 13th, 2011, 09:12 AM
It depends on the guitar

Tele - 10's (Ernie ball regular)
EC Strat - 10's
Les Paul / 9's
AtelierZ Strat - 9's
Red Special Super - custom set 8-9's mix

I am very impressed with the Ernie ball 46--10 on my new Clapton Strat, they feel like 9's.

Guitarzan631
August 13th, 2011, 08:37 PM
Your ears are not playing tricks on you, Leep Dog. You've breathed new life into your Tele. There are many good answers in this regards to this topic. As a electronics/guitar tech, my suggestion to all musicians is that if you're used to 9's, go to Standard 10's. (NOT hybrid/slinky sets) They're just slightly harder to bend, so you won't have such an awkward and distracting time feeling and adjusting your playing style. But you will absolutely gain a bit more warmth in the tone, as well as sustain. Part of this is due to the additional mass vibrating through the magnetic field of the pickups, inducing a stronger signal. Above that, they will be easier to set and hold the intonation.

As far as setup, you should only have to adjust your truss rod a minimal amount to compensate for the additional tension, and then also reset the intonation; basic things you'd have to do no matter which higher gauge you decide to go with. Also, the diameter of 10 gauge sets are still narrow enough that you won't have worry about nut slot width issues; something a lot of guitarists don't take into consideration with even thicker gauges. Once those routine procedures are completed, you should notice an immediate difference in how defined your chords ring out, especially further up the neck. Oddly enough, and as an added bonus, 10's seem to be quite a bit less susceptible to breakage. :)