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cold winter: good or bad for ticks?

eddiewagner
February 9th, 2010, 09:32 AM
hi outdoor-experts round here. we are having a pretty cold winter here in germany. i wonder if that will reduce the ticks or help them in some sort of weird way to survive. we had a bunch of snow, that melted away and it got cold agin so everything is nicely frozen. eddie

JimmyJam
February 9th, 2010, 09:38 AM
I think a hard freeze kills some bugs, but not all of them.

Jahmbie
February 9th, 2010, 09:45 AM
I think a hard freeze kills some bugs, but not all of them.
Not ticks. They become dormant in cold weather, but can emerge on warmer days or mid-winter thaws and attach themselves to animals or clothing. Any infested clothing should be put in a hot dryer for about 15 minutes to kill the ticks.

PapaBeef
February 9th, 2010, 09:52 AM
I hope it kills some of the stinkin' fleas we've been infested with over here.
This past summer has been the worst ever. And I still find one every so often even now.
We've been treating the dog & cat regularly & spraying the heck outta the whole house & yard. And they just keep coming back.

Stubee
February 9th, 2010, 12:02 PM
I think a hard freeze kills some bugs, but not all of them.I spend a few weeks a year in NW Ontario. Gets to -40F and below there most winters & doesn't seem to faze the ticks in the slightest come spring. Wish it would...

hollowman
February 9th, 2010, 12:10 PM
What, you don't like blood sucking parasites?

gatego
February 9th, 2010, 12:21 PM
My pet vet :mrgreen: told me to be aware of ticks beginnung of March in southern Germany. it seems that they can resisty even a little lower temperatures....

Brad Pittiful
February 9th, 2010, 12:22 PM
What, you don't like blood sucking parasites?

oh now now...you know we arent supposed to talk about politicians here ;)

jhundt
February 9th, 2010, 12:39 PM
Any infested clothing should be put in a hot dryer for about 15 minutes to kill the ticks.

should you do the dogs too? maybe it's best to run them through the washer too...

eddiewagner
February 9th, 2010, 01:11 PM
should you do the dogs too? maybe it's best to run them through the washer too...
hi jon, can you believe that the rhythm cat wants more dogs? now she is teasing me with a st. bernard all the time. it might get crowded in the washingmashine.
I spend a few weeks a year in NW Ontario. Gets to -40F and below there most winters & doesn't seem to faze the ticks in the slightest come spring. Wish it would...
i think this is the answer. not really what i would like to hear. so we have to spend some money on tick-repellent again.

woodman
February 9th, 2010, 01:13 PM
We're on track for the coldest winter ever here, with temps averaging 10 degrees below normal all year. Saw a newspaper story that said it will decrease the number of insect pests this summer, and i hope it's true the mosquitoes have been hell in recent years.

jhundt
February 9th, 2010, 03:38 PM
do ticks avoid high altitude?

I remember visiting friends in South Lake Tahoe; we brought our golden retriever, and tried to assure our hosts that the dog had no fleas. They told us that fleas can't live in high altitudes, and that there were NO fleas in the Tahoe Basin. And, if our dog did have fleas when he came up the hill, they would all be gone when he went back down.

BTW Eddie - in South Lake Tahoe bears are everywhere. In fact they area pest, like rats or mice. Our friends kept their garbage containers locked in a shed so the bears wouldn't tear everything apart. They didn't worry too much about the bears, but they warned us to make a lot of noise if we walked outside at night so the bears could hear us coming and they could run and hide.

woodman
February 9th, 2010, 03:48 PM
It's true about the fleas ... when we lived on the Front Range of the Rockies at 7,000 feet, our cats had nary a flea. Doubt if that holds true for ticks, though (think Rocky Mountain spotted fever!).

Tdot
February 9th, 2010, 04:05 PM
do ticks avoid high altitude?

They live at 6,000+ feet. Never seen a flea around here.

chet
February 9th, 2010, 04:07 PM
What, you don't like blood sucking parasites?

Yeah. You tell me you don't love bloodsucking parasites that can also transmit Lymes disease?

WOW!


:lol:

chet
February 9th, 2010, 04:09 PM
do ticks avoid high altitude?

I remember visiting friends in South Lake Tahoe; we brought our golden retriever, and tried to assure our hosts that the dog had no fleas. They told us that fleas can't live in high altitudes, and that there were NO fleas in the Tahoe Basin. And, if our dog did have fleas when he came up the hill, they would all be gone when he went back down.

BTW Eddie - in South Lake Tahoe bears are everywhere. In fact they area pest, like rats or mice. Our friends kept their garbage containers locked in a shed so the bears wouldn't tear everything apart. They didn't worry too much about the bears, but they warned us to make a lot of noise if we walked outside at night so the bears could hear us coming and they could run and hide.

PapaBeef: There ya go- take your dog and cat up to the mountains for a few days. :lol:

Bones
February 9th, 2010, 05:05 PM
It has been below freezing here for a good part of the winter, last Sunday, I took the dogs to the beach it was 15 degrees "F". On Monday I found ticks on my boy. So I'm not sure what's going on, but I did not expect it.

hollowman
February 9th, 2010, 05:16 PM
We're on track for the coldest winter ever here, with temps averaging 10 degrees below normal all year. Saw a newspaper story that said it will decrease the number of insect pests this summer, and i hope it's true the mosquitoes have been hell in recent years.

you would think that would be true, but have you ever been to Minnesota in the summer? Man those skeeters are thick! Must have nothing to do with the cold, unfortunately

boris bubbanov
February 9th, 2010, 07:57 PM
Rather have that intense cold to kill back most of the varmints in the lawn.

It just reshuffles the deck. It can actually make mosquitos worse, since it kills back their insect competition worse than it does them.

As the ticks can seek the safety of warm animals, it gave them a fighting chance to stay in the game as it were, to develop some resistance when they are holed up on a branch alongside the trail. Or in brush. Uncanny how they can spring into action after being just dormant for months. Fleas have to revert back to egg form.

PapaBeef
February 10th, 2010, 12:00 AM
PapaBeef: There ya go- take your dog and cat up to the mountains for a few days. :lol:

I wish I could take my whole house.
Otherwise them b@$tards would still be waitin' there for us when we got back.:lol:

Nick JD
February 10th, 2010, 01:36 AM
I suppose I had beter put in the obligitory Aussie horror story for y'all.

Over here we have a tick called the Paralysis Tick. Here she is!

http://ipswichdoggrooming.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/07/paralysis-tick.jpg

You guys itchy yet? [Shudder]

They'll kill a dog in 48 hours and you only know when you dog starts wobbling about. If it's dragging its back legs it's usually toast.

Not many people would be misdiagnosed now and die from one - but a lot of people (mainly kids) have in the past.

Nasty little feckers.

From an ecological POV in relation to the OP's post - ticks have predators. It's a much more complex system than simply being dependant on climate fluctuations. And an example the ticks in northern Sydney a few years ago were in force because the drought had knocked back a parasitic (oh the irony) wasp that preyed on ticks.

You might find that the cold is just killing the ticks only predator...

PapaBeef
February 10th, 2010, 01:52 AM
Where I grew up, I thought was the tick capital of the world.
You look out the window & you'll be picking the little suckers offa yourself for an hour.
I walked to school. And when I got there I'd start picking ticks out of my hair & stuff. And I'd start a daily school wide heebie jeebies epidemic.
But that was strictly based on quantity.
Looks like you had the quality goods over there.:


"I suppose I had beter put in the obligitory Aussie horror story for y'all.

Over here we have a tick called the Paralysis Tick. Here she is!



You guys itchy yet? [Shudder]

They'll kill a dog in 48 hours and you only know when you dog starts wobbling about. If it's dragging its back legs it's usually toast.

Not many people would be misdiagnosed now and die from one - but a lot of people (mainly kids) have in the past.

Nasty little feckers."

Unseen
February 10th, 2010, 04:14 AM
hi outdoor-experts round here. we are having a pretty cold winter here in germany. i wonder if that will reduce the ticks or help them in some sort of weird way to survive. we had a bunch of snow, that melted away and it got cold agin so everything is nicely frozen. eddie

Should the ticks be nervous then? (Germans may not get that joke.)

eddiewagner
February 10th, 2010, 05:58 AM
^^^^^^^^
as expected, i did not get it. can you explain sir?
ahhhhhh, a nervous tick...... slowly.... i get it......